The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas

1827

Baker's Hall.

A plain brick edifice, the site of which was formerly occupied by the dwelling-house of John Chicheley, chamberlain of London, and nephew to the archbishop of Canterbury, of that name. He, according to Stow, had children, by of whom, Elizabeth, these premises were carried in marriage to sir Thomas Kyrioll; but by what means they came into the possession of the baker's company does not appear. The entrance to this building is under

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a colonnade of Ionic pillars. The hall is ornamented with a screen of the composite order, in which are arches, with carvings of fruit and flowers above; and at the north end of the room are large paintings, the centre displaying

the arms of the company;

that to the right

Justice, with her attributes,

and that on the left,

St. Clement,

the patron of the company, all in bad state of preservation. The court room is spacious and handsome; and is decorated with Corinthian pilasters at each end. Over the door of entrance are the royal arms, and over the master's chair those of the company. Above the mantel-piece is a -quarter length portrait of sir John William Anderson, bart. lord mayor in .

At the end of a court on the south side of , was, until , a magnificent mansion of the latter part of the reign of Henry the .

This house,

says Mr. Smith,

was let out, in tenements, to persons of different callings, the greater part being occupied by Mr. Smith, a carpenter, who held to himself the use of the whole yard, in the north part of which a saw-pit had been sunk.

The exterior of this building was entirely covered with grotesque carvings; the basement supported pannels, in which were shields of arms, all carved in oak. The interior was in a similar style to sir Paul Pindar's house in . Some persons conceived this to have been the residence of Whittington, but Mr. Smith was assured by the late Dr. Owen, vicar of this parish, that it was formerly the residence of sir William Sharington who lived in parish, in the latter part of the reign of Henry the .

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Ancient Topography of London, p. 44

[] Vide ante, p. 165.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
CHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
CHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
CHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
CHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
CHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
CHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
CHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
CHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
CHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
CHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward