The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas

1827

The Boar's Head.

 

A few years ago the tavern was pulled down and houses built upon its site, but the original sign still exists in the front of of the houses.

The church of St. Martin Orgar's, which was burnt down in the fire of London, A. D. , was situated on the east side of , , a rectory of very ancient foundation, for by the register of Ralph Diceto, dean of in the year , we find it in the gift of the canons of . The name Orgar, added to it, was taken from Ordgarus the founder, who gave that and St. Botolph's, , to the said canons of .

There was a parsonage house, which was burnt down, and after it was rebuilt, let out at the ground rent of per ann. for years, to be paid to the rector and his successors.

The site of this church, after the fire, was made a burial place for the parishioners. However, part of the nave and tower being found repairable, a body of French protestants, in communion with the church of England, obtained a lease of the tower and ruinous nave from the minister and church-wardens, and got it confirmed by parliament: in pursuance of which, the purchasers re-erected the church for their own use.

Sir William Cromer, lord mayor of London in , gave by his last will, dated , his house in Sweeting's alley, and his houses and gardens in , for the repairs and ornaments of this church, and for the use of the poor.

The French church which was built upon its site after the great fire, must have been of smaller dimensions than the original, as a wide space remained between the front of it and the porch of the old church now existing. It was a plain edifice of brick, with arched windows, nearly square; the engraving below was taken from a sketch made a few days prior to its destruction, and will avoid the necessity of further.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
CHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
CHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
CHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
CHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
CHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
CHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
CHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
CHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
CHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
CHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward