The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas

1827

Temple Bar.

 

On the spot where this gate stands were, anciently, posts, rails, and a chain, as in other places where the city liberties

677

terminated. Afterwards, a house of timber was erected across the street, with a narrow gateway, and an entry through the south side of it. But, since the fire of London, the present structure was erected, and is the only remaining gate at the extremity of the city liberties.

This gate is a very noble , and has posterns, on each side, for the convenience of foot passengers. It is built entirely of Portland-stone, of rustic work below, and of the Corinthian order. The great arch is elliptical and very flat. Over the gateway, on the east side, in niches, are stone statues of queen Elizabeth and king James I. with the city arms over the key-stone, and on the west side are the statues of king Charles I. and king Charles II. in Roman habits, with the royal arms on the key-stone. The architect was sir Christopher Wren; the sculptor John Bushnell.

On the top of this gate were exhibited the heads of the unfortunate men who embarked in the rebellion of .

The ground in the neighbourhood of St. Dunstan's church appears to have been anciently of a marshy nature, or else within the course of the tide; for, in digging at the end of , and further eastward, in , in the year , a stone pavement was discovered at the depth of feet from the surface, which was supported by a number of piles, driven very close to each other.

A little to the east of St. Dunstan's church, and near the south end of , is Crane-court, in which is a neat plain building, called

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
CHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
CHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
CHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
CHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
CHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
CHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
CHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
CHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
CHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
CHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward