The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas

1827

This ward takes its name from the ancient water-gate, called Dourgate, which was made in the original wall that ran along the north side of the Thames, for the security of the city of London, against all attempts to invade it by water. It was originally of the gates, or the south gate of this city, where anciently was the trajectus, or ferry of the , whose direction was towards the north-west, as was discovered in digging the foundation of Bow-church, in , and of the great Roman military ways; and Stow, by naming it Downgate, from the great descent from St. John Baptist's church on , to the river Thames, is mistaken: because, considering the discovery of a tesselated Roman pavement in this neighbourhood, it will appear, that there was little or no descent at that place when this gate was at erected; therefore, it could not receive its name from that: wherefore, Leland is probably correct in conceiving that it was anciently formed by the Britons, under the Roman government, and called Dour-gate, that is, the water-gate; which, according to the reasons there assigned, answers exactly to this place; and if so, this was the only original water-gate.

This ward is divided into precincts, named the , , , &c. It is bounded on the east by Candlewick and Bridge wards, on the north by ward, on the west by Vintry ward, and, on the south, by the river Thames.

It is under the government of an alderman, and returns

509

inhabitants to the court of common council. Before the great fire in , there were churches in this ward, Allhallows the great, and Allhallows the less; the former was only rebuilt.

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Vide ante, vol. i. p.6.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
CHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
CHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
CHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
CHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
CHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
CHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
CHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
CHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
CHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
CHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward