The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas

1827

Stock Exchange.

A neat plain building, fronted with stone to the height o the attic story, which is of brick. It was erected in the year , by Mr. James Peacock, architect; and is very conveniently arranged, and handsomely fitted up. The expense was defrayed by a subscription among the principal stock-brokers, of transferable shares. No person is allowed to transact business here but those who are ballotted for annually by a committee, and on being chosen, subscribe guineas each. Under the clock at the south end of the spacious room where the subscribers assemble, is a tablet for the purpose of exhibiting the names of such defaulters as have not been able, or willing, to settle their losses on agreements made for the purchase or transfer of stock, and who are not again suffered to become members. On the east side is a recess, with an elevated desk, for the use of

the commissioners for the redemption of the national debt

, who make their purchases times a week, namely, on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, precisely at the hour of . Since the creation of foreign stocks an additional building has been erected for the accommodation of the speculators on these funds. No other business is transacted here, than what solely relates to the purchase and sale of stock in the public funds, Exchequer bills, India bonds, and the like securities. The hours are from till : this building has entrances, besides the principal in .

 
 
Footnotes:

[] A singular custom is connected with the stock exchange. The number of Jew brokers admitted by the city, is limited to twelve, and these only on condition of purchasing the privilege by a liberal gratuity to the lord mayor for the time being. During the mayoralty of Wilkes, one of the Jew brokers was taken seriously ill, and his lordship is said to have calculated pretty openly on the advantage he would derive from filling up the expected vacancy. The son of the broker meeting the lord mayor reproached him with wishing his father's death. My dear fellow, said Wilkes, with that sarcastic humour which was peculiar to him, you are completely in error, for I would rather all the Jew brokers were dead than your father.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
CHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
CHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
CHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
CHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
CHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
CHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
CHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
CHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
CHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
CHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward