The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 4

Allen, Thomas

1827

Procession to the Abbey.

 

The gun was then fired, and the procession moved upon the blue cloth spread on the platform from the throne in

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hall to the great steps in the abbey church; the following anthem,

O lord, grant the king a long life,

&c. being sung in parts, in succession, with his majesty's band playing, the sounding of trumpets, and the beating of drums, until the arrival in the abbey.
The King's Herb-woman with her six Maids, strewing the way with herbs.
Messenger of the College of Arms, in a scarlet cloak, with the arms of the College
embroidered on the left shoulder.
The Dean's Beadle of Westminster, with his staff
The High Constable of Westminster, with his staff, in a scarlet cloak.
Two Household Fifes with banners of velvet fringed with gold, and five House-
hold Drummers in royal livery, drum-covers of crimson velvet,
laced and fringed with gold.
The Drum-Major, in a rich livery, and a crimson scarf fringed with gold.
Eight Trumpets in rich liveries; banners of crimson damask embroidered and
fringed with gold, to the silver trumpets.
Kettle-Drums, drum-covers of crimson damask, embroidered and fringed
with gold.
Eight trumpets in liveries, as before.
Serjeant Trumpeter, with his mace.
The Knight Marshal, attended by his Officers.
The Six Clerks in Chancery.
The King's Chaplains having dignities.
The Sheriffs of London.
The Aldermen and Recorder of London.
Masters in Chancery.
The King's Serjeants at Law.
The King's Ancient Serjeant.
The King's Solicitor General.The King's Attorney General.
Gentlemen of the Privy Chamber.
Serjeant of the Vestry of the Chapel Royal.Serjeant Porter.
Children of the Choir of Westminster, in surplices.
Children of the Chapel Royal, in surplices, with scarlet mantles over them.
Choir of Westminster, in surplices.
Gentlemen of the Chapel Royal, in scarlet mantles.
Sub-Dean of the Chapel Royal, in a scarlet gown.
Prebendaries of Westminster, in surplices and rich copes.
The Dean of Westminster, in a surplice and rich cope.
Pursuivants of Scotland and Ireland, in their tabards.
His Majesty's Band.
Officer attendant on the Knights Commanders of the Bath, in their mantles,
chains, and badges.
Knights Grand Crosses of the Bath (not Peers) in the full habit of their order,
caps in their hands.
A Pursuivant of Arms, in his tabard.
Barons of the Exchequer and Justices of both benches.
The Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer.The Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.
The Vice Chancellor.The Master of the Rolls.
The Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench.
The Clerks of the Council in Ordinary.
Privy Councillors, not Peers.
Register of the Order of the Garter.
Knights of the Garter (not Peers), in the full habit and collar
of the order, caps in their hands.
His Majesty's Vice Chamberlain.
Comptroller of His Majesty's Household.Treasurer of His Majesty's Household, bearing the crimson bag with the medals.
A Pursuivant of Arms, in his tabard.
 
Heralds of Scotland and Ireland, in their tabards and collars of SS.
The Standard of Hanover, borne by the Earl of Mayo.
Barons, in their robes of estate, their coronets in their hands.
A Herald, in his tabard and collar of SS.
The Standard of Ireland, borne by Lord Beresford.The Standard of Scotland, borne by the Earl of Lauderdale.
The Bishops of England and Ireland, in their rochets, with
their caps in their hands.
Two Heralds, in their tabards and collars of SS.
Viscounts, in their robes of estate, their coronets in their hands.
Two Heralds, in their tabards and collars of SS.
The Standard of England, borne by Lord Hill.
Earls, in their robes of estate, their coronets in their hand.
Two Heralds, in their tabards and collars of 88.
The Union Standard, borne by Earl Harcourt.
Marquesses, in their robes of estate, their coronets in their hands.
The Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty's Household, in his robes of estate,
his coronet in his hand, attended by an officer of the Jewel-Office in a
scarlet mantle, with a crown embroidered on his left shoulder,
bearing a cushion, on which are placed the ruby ring and the
sword to be girt about the King.
The Lord Steward of His Majesty's Household, in his robes
of estate, his coronet in his hand.
The Royal Standard, borne by the Earl of Harrington.
King of Arms of the Order of St.Michael and St. George, in his tabard, crown in his hand.Gloucester King of Arms, in his tabard, crown in his hand.Hanover King of Arms, in his tabard, crown in his hand.
Dukes, in their robes of estate, their coronets in their hands.
Ulster King of Arms, in his tabard, crown in his hand.Clarenceux King of Arms, in his tabard, crown in his hand.Norroy King of Arms, in his tabard, crown in his lend.
The Lord Privy Seal, in his robes of estate, coronet in his hand.The Lord President of the Council, in his robes of estate, coronet in his hand.
Archbishops of Ireland.
The Archbishop of York, in his rochet; cap in his hand.
The Lord High Chancellor, in his robes of estate, with his coronet in his
hand, bearing his purse, and attended by his Pursebearer.
The Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, in his rochet, cap in his hand.
Two Serjeants at Arms.
St. Edward's Staff, borne by the Marquess of Salisbury.The Gold Spurs, borne by the Lord Calthorpe.The Sceptre with the Cross, borne by the Marquess Wellesley.
The third Sword, borne by the Earl of Galloway.Curtana, borne by the Duke of Newcastle.The second Sword, borne by the Duke of Northumberland.
Two Sarjeants at Arms.
Usher of the Green Rod. Usher of the White Rod.
The Lord Mayor of London, in his gown, collar, and jewel, bearing the city mace.The Lord Lyon of Scotland, in his tabard, carrying his crown and sceptre.Garter Principal King of Arms, in his tabard, bearing his crown and sceptre.Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, bearing his rod.
 
The Deputy lord Great Chamberlain of England, in his robes of estate, his coronet and his white staff in his hand.
His Royal Highness the Prince Leopold, in the full habit of the Order of the Garter, carrying in his right band his baton as Field Marshal, and, in his left, his cap and feathers; his train borne by a Page.
His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, in his robes of estate, carrying, in his right hand, his baton as Field Marshal, and in his left his coronet; his train borne by a Page.
His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, in his robes of estate, carrying, in his right hand, his baton as Field Marshal, and his coronet in his left; and his train borne by a Page.
His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, in his robes of estate, with his coronet in his hand, and his train borne by a Page.
His Royal Highness the Duke of Clarence, in his robes of estate, with his coronet in his hand, and his train borne by a Page.
His Royal Highness the Duke of York, in his robes of estate, carrying, in his right hand, his baton as Field Marshal, and his coronet in his left, and his train borne by a Page.
The High Constable of Ireland, in his robes, coronet in his hand, with his staff.The High Constable of Scotland, in his robes, coronet in his hand, with his staff.
Two Serjeants at Arms.
A Gentleman carrying the Stff of the Lord High Steward.The Deputy Earl Marshal with his staff.The Sword of State, borne by the Duke of Dorset.The Lord High Constable of England, in his robes, his coronet in his hand, with his staff; attended by a Page carrying his baton of Field Marshal.A Gentleman carrying the Coronet of the Lord High Steward.
Two Serjeants at Arms.
 The Sceptre with the Dove, carried by the Duke of Rutland.St. Edward's Crown, carried by the Lord High Steward in his robes.The Orb, carried by the Duke of Devonshire.
 The Patina, borne by the Bishop of Gloucester.The Bible, borne by the Bishop of Ely.The Chalice, borne by the Bishop of Chester.
Twenty Gentleman Pensioners, with the Standard Bearer.Supporter: Lord Bishop of Oxford, for the Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells.The KingSupporter: Lord Bishop of Lincoln, for the Lord Bishop of Durham.Twenty Gentleman Pensioners with the Lieutenant.
  In the Royal Robes, wearing a cap of estate, adorned with jewels, under a canopy of cloth of gold. borne by Sixteen Barons of the Cinque Ports. His Majesty's Train borne by Eight Eldest Sons of Peers, assisted by the Master of the Robes, and followed by the Groom of the Robes.
  
 Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard, in his robes of estate; coronet in his hand.Gold Stick of the Life Guards in Waiting, in his robes; coronet in his hand.Captain of the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, in his robes of estate; coronet in his hand.
Lords of the Bedchamber.
The Keeper of His Majesty's Privy Purse.
Grooms of the King's Bedchamber.
Equerries and Pages of Honour.
Aides-de-Camp.
Gentlemen Ushers.
Physicians, Surgeons, Apothecaries.
 Ensign of the Yeomen of the Guard.Lieutenant of the Yeomen of the Guard.
His Majesty's Pages in full State Liveries.
His Majesty's Footmen in full State Liveries.
Exons of the Yeomen of the Guard. Yeomen of the Guard. Exons of the Yeomen of the Guard.
Gentleman Harbinger of the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners.
Clerk of the Cheque to the Yeomen of the Guard.Clerk of the Cheque to the Gentlemen Pensioners.
Yeomen of the Guard, to close the Procession.

On the arrival of the procession at the abbey, the herb-woman and her maids, and the serjeant porter, remained at the entrance within the great west door.

The king entered the west door of the abbey church at o'clock, and was received with the under-mentioned anthem, which was sung by the choir of , who, with the dean and prebendaries, quitted the procession a little before, and went to the left side of the middle aisle, and remained there till his majesty arrived, and then followed in the procession next to the regalia.

On his majesty's entering the abbey, the choirs commenced singing the anthem,

I was glad when they said unto me, we will go into the house of the Lord, &c.

Psalm cxxii verses 1, 5, 6. 7.

During which his majesty passed through the body of the church, and through the choir up the stairs to the theatre. He then passed his throne and made his humble adoration, and afterwards knelt at the faldstool set for him before his chair; at the same time his majesty used some short private prayer; he then sat down (not on his throne, but in his chair before and below his throne) and reposed himself.

When the king was thus placed, the archbishop of Canterbury turned to the east part of the theatre; then, together with the lord chancellor, lord great chamberlain, lord high constable, and earl marshal (Garter king at arms preceding them), went to the other sides of the theatre, in the order, south, west, and north, and at each side addressed the people in a loud voice; the king at the same time standing up by his chair, turned and showed himself to the people at each of the sides of the theatre, while the archbishop spoke as follows :--

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SIRS,

I here present unto you King George the Fourth, the undoubted king of this realm; wherefore all you that come this day to do your homage, are ye willing to do the same?

This was answered by the loud and repeated acclamations of the persons present, expressive of their willingness and joy, at the same time they cried out,

God save King George the

Fourth

!

Then the trumpets sounded.

The archbishop in the meantime went to the altar and put on his cope, and placed himself at the north side of the altar; as did also the bishops who took part in the office.

The officers of the wardrobe, &c. here spread carpets and cushions on the floor and steps of the altar.

And here, the Bible, paten, and cup, were brought and placed upon the altar. The king, then, supported by the bishops of Durham and Bath, and attended by the dean of , the lords carrying the regalia before him, went down to the altar, and knelt upon the steps of it, and made his oblation, uncovered.

Here the pall, or altar-cloth of gold, was delivered by the master of the great wardrobe to the lord great chamberlain, and by him, kneeling, it was presented to his majesty. The treasurer of the household then delivered a wedge of gold of a pound weight to the lord great chamberlain, which he, kneeling, delivered to his majesty. The king then (uncovered) delivered them to the archbishop.

The archbishop received them after another (standing) from his majesty, and laid the pall reverently upon the altar. The gold was received into the basin, and, with like reverence, was placed upon the altar.

Then the archbishop said the following prayer, the king still kneeling:--

O God, who dwellest in the high and holy place, &c.

When the king had thus offered his oblation, he went to his chair set for him on the south side of the altar, and knelt at his faldstool, and the Litany commenced, which was read by bishops, vested in copes, and kneeling at a faldstool above the steps of the theatre, on the middle of the east side; the choir read the responses.

In the meantime the lords who carried the regalia, except those who bore the swords, approached the altar, and each presented what he carried to the archbishop, who delivered them to the dean of , who placed them on the altar. They then retired to the places and seats appointed for them.

The bishops, and the people with them, then said the Lord's Prayer.

The Communion service was read; the people, kneeling, made the responses to the commandments, which were delivered by the archbishop.

30

 

Then the archbishop, standing as before, said a collect for the king.

The following epistle was then read by of the bishops;--

Submit yourselves to man for the Lord's sake; whether it be to the king as supreme, or unto governors, &c.

I Pet. ii. 13.

The Gospel was then read by another bishop, the king and the people standing.

Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel how they might entangle him in his talk. And they sent out unto him, &c.

St. Matth. xxii. 15.

Then the archbishop read the Nicene Creed; the king and the people standing as before.

I believe in

one

God the Father, &c.

At the end of the creed, the archbishop of York preached the sermon in the pulpit placed against the pillar at the north-east corner of the theatre. The king listened to the same sitting in his chair on the south side of the altar, over against the pulpit.

His grace commenced the sermon at a quarter past , and ended it about a quarter to .

The king was uncovered during the offering and service that followed; when the sermon commenced he put on his cap of crimson velvet turned up with ermine, and remained covered to the end of it.

On his majesty's right hand stood the bishop of Durham, and beyond him, on the same side, the lords that carried the swords. On his majesty's left hand stood the bishop of Bath and Wells, and the lord great chamberlain.

On the north side of the altar sat the archbishop of Canterbury in a purple velvet chair; the bishops were placed on forms along the north side of the wall, betwixt the king and the pulpit. Near the archbishop stood Garter, king at arms. On the south side, east of the king's chair, nearer to the altar, stood the dean of , the rest of the bishops who took part in the church service, and the prebendaries of .

When the sermon was concluded, the archbishop went to the king, and standing before him, administered the coronation oath, asking the king-

Sir; is your Majesty willing to take the oath? The king answered:--I am willing.

The archbishop then ministered these questions: and the king having a copy of the printed form and order of the coronation service in his hands, answered each question severally, as follows:

Arch. Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the respective laws and customs of the same?

King. I solemnly promise so to do.

Arch. Will you to your power cause law and justice, in mercy, to be executed in all your judgments?

King. I will.

Arch. Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant Reformed Religion established bylaw? And will you maintain and preserve inviolably the settlement of the United Church of England and Ireland, and the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government thereof, as by law established within England and Ireland, and the territories thereunto belonging? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of England and Ireland, and to the United Church committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges, as by law do, or shall appertain to them, or any of them?

King. All this I promise to do.

Then the king, arising out of his chair, and assisted by the lord great chamberlain, the sword of state being carried before him, went to the altar, and there being uncovered, made his solemn oath in the sight of all the people, to observe the premises; laying his right hand upon the Holy Gospel in the great Bible, which was before carried in the procession, and was now brought from the altar by the archbishop, and tendered to him as he knelt upon the steps, saying these words:

The things which I have here before promised, I will perform and keep.

So help me God.

Then the king kissed the hook and signed the oath.

The king having thus taken his oath, returned again to the chair; and kneeling at his faldstool, the archbishop begun the hymn , and the choir sang it out.

This being ended, the archbishop said this prayer:--

O Lord Holy Father, who by anointing with oil didst of old make and consecrate kings, priests, and prophets, to teach and govern thy people Israel: bless and sanctify thy chosen servant George, who by our office and ministry is now to be anointed with this oil, and consecrated King of this realm: strengthen him O Lord, with the Holy Ghost the Comforter; Confirm and establish him with thy free and princely spirit, the spirit of wisdom and government, the spirit of counsel and ghostly strength, the spirit of knowledge and true godliness, and fill him, O Lord, with the spirit of thy holy fear, now and for ever. Amen.

This prayer being ended, the choir sang:

Zadok the priest, and Nathan the prophet, anointed Solomon King; and all the people rejoiced, and said, God save the King Long live the King! May the King live for ever! Amen. Hallelujah!

In the meantime the king, rising from his devotions, went before the altar, supported and attended as before.

The king sat down in his chair, placed in the midst of the area over against the altar, with the faldstool before it, wherein he was anointed. knights of the garter held over him a rich pall of silk, or cloth of gold; the dean of took the ampula and spoon from off the altar, poured some of the holy oil into the spoon, and with it the archbishop anointed the king, in the form of a cross:

32

 

. On the crown of the head, saying,

Be thy head anointed with holy oil, as kings, priests, and prophets were anointed.

. On the breast, saying,

Be thy breast anointed with holy oil.

. On the palms of both the hands, saying,

Be thy hands anointed with holy oil:

And as Solomon was anointed king by Zadok the priest, and Nathan the prophet, so be you anointed, blessed, and consecrated King over this people, whom the Lord your God hath given you to rule and govern, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Then the dean of laid the ampula and spoon upon the altar, and the king kneeling down at the faldstool, and the archbishop standing on the north side of the altar, pronounced the benediction:--

Our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who by his Father was anointed, &c.

This prayer being ended, the king arose, and sat down again in his chair, and the dean of wiped and dried all the places anointed, with fine linen, or fine bombast wool, delivered to him by the lord great chamberlain; the dean then received from the officers of the wardrobe, the super-tunica of cloth of gold, and a girdle of the same for the sword, with which the dean arrayed his majesty.

Then the spurs were brought from the altar by the dean of , and delivered to a nobleman thereto appointed by the king, who, kneeling down, presents them to his majesty, who forthwith sent them back to the altar.

Then the lord who carried the sword of state, returned the said sword to the officers of the jewel house, which was thereupon deposited in the traverse in king Edward's chapel; he received thence, in lieu thereof, another sword, in a scabbard of purple velvet, provided for the king to be girt withal, which he delivered to the archbishop; and the archbishop, laying it on the altar, said the following prayer:

Hear our prayers, O Lord, we beseech thee, and so direct and support thy servant King George, who is now to be girt with this sword, that he may not bear it in vain; but may use it as the minister of God, for the terror and punishment of evil doers, and for the protection and encouragement of those that do well, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Then the archbishop took the sword from off the altar, and (the bishops assisting, and going along with him) delivered it into the king's right hand, and he holding it, the archbishop said:

Receive this kingly sword, brought now from the altar of God, and delivered to you by the hands of us the bishops and servants of God, though unworthy.

The king stood up, the sword was girt about him by the lord great chamberlain, and then, the king sitting down, the archbishop said:

33

Remember him of whom the royal Psalmist did prophesy, saying, &c.

Then the king, rising up, ungirded his sword, and, going to the altar, offered it there in the scabbard, and then returned and sat down in his chair: and the chief peer offered the price of it, namely, a , and having thus redeemed it, received it from off the altar by the dean of , and drew it out of the scabbard, and carried it naked before his majesty during the rest of the solemnity.

Then the king arising, the dean of took the armill from the master of the great wardrobe, and put it about his majesty's neck, and tied it to the bowings of his arms, above and below the elbows, with silk strings; the archbishop standing before the king, and saying:

Receive this armill as a token of the divine mercy embracing you on every ride.

Next the robe royal, or purple robe of state, of cloth of tissue, lined or furred with ermines, was by the master of the great wardrobe delivered to the dean of , and by him put upon the king, standing; the crimson robe which he wore before being taken off by the lord great chamberlain: the king having received it, sat down, and then the orb with the cross was brought from the altar by the dean of , and delivered into the king's hand by the archbishop, pronouncing this blessing and exhortation :

Receive this imperial robe and orb, &c.

Then the master of the jewel-house delivered the king's ring to the archbishop, in which a table jewel was enchased; the archbishop put it on the finger of his majesty's right hand, and said :--

Receive this ring, the ensign of kingly dignity, and of defence of the Catholic faith, &c.

The king delivered his orb to the dean of , to be by him laid upon the altar; and then the dean of brought the sceptre and rod to the archbishop; and the lord of the manor of Worksop (who claimed to hold an estate by the service of presenting to the king a right hand glove on the day of his coronation, and supporting the king's right arm whilst he holds the sceptre with the cross) delivered to the king a pair of rich gloves, and on any occasion happening afterwards, supported his majesty's right arm, or held his sceptre by him.

The gloves being put on, the archbishop delivered the sceptre, with the cross, into the king's right hand, saying,

Receive the royal sceptre, the ensign of kingly power and justice.

And then he delivered the rod, with the dove, into the king's left hand, and said,

Receive the rod of equity and mercy and God, from whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed, &c.

 
 
Footnotes:

[] His text was, He that ruleth over men must be just, &c. 2 Samuel, chap. 23, verse 3 and 4.

[] His majesty, on Thursday, the 27th of April, 1820, in the presence of the two Houses of Parliament, made and signed the declaration against popery.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
CHAPTER I: Site, local divisions, and government of the City of Westminster; history of the Abbey; Coronation Ceremonies; and lists of the Abbots and Deans
CHAPTER II: Westminster Abbey, and Description of the Tombs and Monuments
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of St. Margaret's Parish
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of St. John's Parish, Westminster
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, Westminster
CHAPTER VI: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. James, Westminster
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Anne, Westminster
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Mary-le-strand
CHAPTER X: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. Clement Danes
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of the parish of st. George, Hanover Square
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of the Precinct of the Savoy
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of the Inns of Court
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of the Precincts of the Charter-house and Ely Place, and the Liberty of the Rolls
 CHAPTER XV: Historical Notices of the Borough of Southwark
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Olave, Southwark
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of the parish of St. John, Southwark
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Thomas, Southwark
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. George's, Southwark
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of St. Saviour's Parish
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of the parist of Christ-church in the County of Surrey
 CHAPTER XXII: A List of the Principal Books, &c that have been published in Illustration of the Antiquities, History, Topography, and other subjects treated of in this Work
 Addenda et Corrigienda
 Postscript