The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 4

Allen, Thomas

1827

Addenda et Corrigienda.
P.
490
. A dinner was given at the Albion Tavern, on the
10th
of
November
,
1828
, on occasion of the completion of the
fifth
and last arch of London-bridge.
P.
501
. The works of the Thames Tunnel were suspended by an order of the directors on the
10th
of
August
,
1828
.
P.
29
. St. Faith is in the ward of Farringdon Without.
P.
54
. In a court in
St. Martin's-le-grand
, opposite the
Post Office
, is a small burying ground consecrated in lieu of the destroyed
one
on the site of
St. Leonard's church
.
P.
57
. On the west wall of the church-yard of St. John Zachary is the following inscription:
BEFORE THE GREAT FIRE, ANNO
1666
,
HERE STOOD THE PARISH CHURCH OF
ST. JOHN ZACHARY.
P.
59
. On the north side of St. Anne's-lane, adjoining St. Anne's church, is the school-house of the St. Anne's Society. It is a neat building of brick from the designs of J. Soane, esq. F.S. A. erected in
1826
. St. Anne's Society was instituted in the year
1709
, and had originally only a day-school for educating and clothing
30
boys and
30
girls, not chosen exclusively from any parish, nor even confined to the metropolis, but admissable from every county; each governor in rotation having the right of presenting any necessitous child. About
thirty
years ago, a most important addition was made to the original institution, by opening an asylum at Peckham for
20
boys: which number has since been increased to
46
;
10
of whom are admitted by merit from the day-school in town. This has been found to act as an effectual stimulus to exertion, as well as an encouragement to good conduct; and the rest are elected by ballot amongst the subscribers at large. Besides this very great acquisition, which the society has gained since its foundation, it now boards with the master and mistress of the town school
eight
of the girls in that establishment,
five
of whom are elected on the foundation, by merit, from the day-school, and the rest by ballot, in the same manner as the boys. The whole
46
boys, and the
8
girls, making together
54
children, are educated on the Madras system, and are boarded, clothed, and entirely provided for, at the expense of the institution, till they have respectively attained that age when they become fit for service or apprenticeships. They are thus shielded from the contaminating effects of depraved and
dissolute habits too prevalent among the poor, and which, it is to be lamented, form a serious but unavoidable evil attendant on common day-schools. The society is conducted by
three
-house-stewards, and a committee of
twenty
, the whole of whom are chosen annually by the governors at large, at a general meeting. This committee subdivides itself into committees of
five
members, who, in monthly rotation, visit the schools, and report their state and progress to the general committee at their monthly meetings.
59
. The picture of
six
lord mayors was the last of Hudson's works, and is engraved by Faben, under the name of the alderman's club.
87
. On taking down
Aldgate
in
1760
, the materials were sold for
177
l.
10
s.
104
. The stone coffin is now in the museum attached to the corporation library in
Guildhall
.
162
. For New London Tavern
read
City of London tavern.
166
. The
first
stone of Bishopsgate new church was laid by the late bishop of London (Dr. Howley) on the
24th
June
,
1828
. The edifice will be a plain structure, in the style generally known as carpenter's Gothic. The architect is Mr. Meredith.
173
. Some remains of the ancient edifice may be seen up the adjacent gateway; they consist of strong walls, with a pointed doorway.
The following is a translation of the inscription written by sir C. Wren :--
Thou who beholdest this lofty column, seest also the spot once so unfortunate and injurious to the city. Here in
2nd
September
,
1666
, at
one
o'clock in the morning, the flame
first
broke out in an obscure dwelling-house, which, impelled by the wind, in a short time grew so powerful, as not only to destroy nearly all the city within the walls, but the walls themselves, and part of the Temple. and what was included between the bank of the river and the farthest walls, was consumed by the raging element. In
three
days
160
churches,
4,000
streets, and more than
14,000
dwelling-houses, were consumed, a large body of citizens deprived of fortune, and even compelled to exist in the open air; all their possessions collected from the whole world being reduced to ashes, so that of that city, which was the finest and most wealthy on which the sun ever shone, nothing scarcely remains but its name, its honour, and a vast pile of ruins.
Charles II. by the grace of God, king of Great
Britain
, France, and Ireland, in the
18th
year of his reign, aided by the councellors of his realm; when the whole city was nearly destroyed, restored it on a more extensive scale than before, and not as formerly of wood and clay, but partly of brick and partly of marble, and so adorned and improved it, that it rose from its ruins, more beautiful and resplendent; besides the buildings and suburbs of the city being increased to an immense extent; in everlasting remembrance of this, on the spot where the flame of so great desolation
first
burnt forth, have erected this monument. Let the present and future generations learn, lest a similar calamity befal them, to offer suitable prayers to God; and let them gratefully acknowledge the kindness of the king and the nobles of the land, by whose liberality the city has received additional security, as well as embellishment and improvement:--
To whom, proud London, what a debt thou owest
For temples vast, and stately edifices
Rising in splendour!
249
. The hall has been repaired in a very elegant and appropriate style, and was
first
opened in
Nov.
9
,
1828
.
278
. The lead of the dome of
St. Paul's cathedral
was repaired in August and
September
,
1828
.
354
-
355
. Divide volume here.
391
. Over the fire place is a fine portrait of sir Robert Clayton, which formerly adorned the court room of the London workhouse.
399
. A new and elegant entrance to Grocer's-hall has been formed in
Princes-street
from the designs of J. Gwilt, esq. F. S. A.
400
. Pennant says,
I have heard that Bucklerbury was, in the reign of king William, noted for the great resort of ladies of fashion, to purchase tea, fans, and other Indian goods. King William, in some of his letters, appears to be angry with his queen for visiting these shops: which, it should seem, by the following lines of Prior, were sometimes perverted to places of intrigue; for, speaking of Hans Carveld's wife, says the poet,
The
first
of all the town was told,
When newest Indian things were sold;
So in a morning, without boddice,
Slipt sometimes out to Mrs. Thody's,
To cheapen tea, or beg a skreen:
What else could so much virtue mean?
400
. In
Lawrence-lane
was a public house of much antiquity, and which is still in great business as a coach-office and inn; it is called the Blossoms Inn, so named, says Pennant, from the rich border of flowers which adorned the original sign, that of St. Lawrence. These were the effects of his martyrdom;
for
(says the legend)
flowers sprung up on the spot of his cruel martyrdom.
400
. In
Queen-street
, on the south side of
Cheapside
, stood Ringed-hall, the house of the earls of Cornwall, given by them in Edward the
Third
's time, to the abbot of Beaulieu, near Oxford. Henry VIII. gave it to Morgan Philip, alias Wolfe.
402
. The church of St. Margaret
Lothbury
is undergoing a thorough repair (
December
,
1828
.)
494
. On the destruction of Cripplegate in
1760
, the materials sold for
91
l.
592
. The poet Garth has the following lines on this edifice:
Where stands a dome majestic to the sight,
And sumptuous arches bear its oval height;
A golden globe, plac'd high with artful skill,
Seems to the distant sight a gilded pill.
On
one
side of the court is a statue of Charles II. and on the opposite, that of sir John Cutler.
In the great room,
says Pennant,
are several portraits of gentlemen of the faculty. Among them sir Theodore Mayerne, a native of Geneva, physician to James and Charles I. The great Sydenham, to whom thousands owe
their
lives, by his daring attempt (too long neglected) of the cool regimen in the small pox. Harvey, who
first
discovered the circulation of the blood. And the learned and pious sir Thomas Brown, who said that the discovery of that great man's, was preferable to the discovery of the New World.
Sir Edmund King, a favourite of Charles II. When that monarch was
first
struck with apoplexy, he had the courage to relieve his majesty by instant bleeding; putting the rigour of the law to defiance in case of failure of success. A
thousand
pounds
was ordered as a reward, but never paid. A very good portrait of the anatomist Vesalius, on board, by John Calkar, a painter from the duchy of Cleves, who died in
1546
. Dr. Goodal, the stentor of Garth's dispensary. Doctor Millington. The portrait of Dr. Freind, the historian of physic, and the most able in his profession, and the most elegant writer of his time, must not be omitted. The fine busts of Harvey, Sydenham, and Mead, the physician of our own days, merit attention. The library was furnished with books by sir Theodore Mayerne. And it received a considerable addition from the marquis of Dorchester.
595
. On taking down Ludgate in
1760
, the materials sold for
148
l.
597
. For John Nichol, read John Nichols.
625
. St. Dunstan's church is situated on the
north
side of
Fleet-street
. St. Dunstan's church is now closed in consequence of the unsound state of the building, and the parishioners have determined on applying to parliament for leave to rebuild the same on a new site.
679
. At the west end of Bangor-court is a small piece of ground consecrated on the
27th
Nov.
1828
, as a burial ground, in lieu of that destroyed, to make way for the new Fleet-market.
685
. St. Dionis Backchurch, is situated on the north side of
Fenchurch-street
.
752
. For vestry
read
rectory.
767
. Cutler's-hall is situated on the south side of
Cloak-lane
, instead of
great St. Thomas Apostle
.
758
. The German
Catholic chapel
is situated on the
south
side of
Great St. Thomas Apostle
, instead of the north side of
Great Trinity-lane
.
215
. Henry VII.'s alms houses were destroyed many years ago.
228
. The front of the banquetting house is now undergoing a thorough repair.
303
. On the north side of Burlington-gardens is Uxbridge house, the town residence of the marquis of Anglesea. It occupies the site of an ancient mansion, known as Queensbury-house, in which the poet Gay for many years enjoyed the distinguished patronage of the duke and duchess of Queensbury, and which, indeed, was the rendezvous of the most enlightened personages of the time. The present mansion is a handsome building of the Composite order with a rustic basement. It has
nine
columns supporting an entablature, and finished with a ballustrade. The building was designed by Mr. Vardy, who was assisted in the disposition of the south and principal front by the late Mr. Joseph Benomi.
323
. The paintings mentioned in the new church in
the Strand
, were removed or destroyed in the last repair; and the decalogue, creed, and paternoster have been crowded into
three
small pannels, beneath the chancel windows.
345
. In Ship-yard, Temple-bar, is an old house said to have been the residence of the celebrated Elias Ashmole.
Engraved in
Wilkinson's Londinium Redivivum.
387
. For
thirteen
read
fourteen
.
401
. In the library of the Inner Temple is preserved in a frame and glass a memorial, which, being but little known, is worth recording in this place :--
1661
, No.
3
.
At this parliament his highness the duke of Yorke, the duke of Buckingham. the earle of Dorset, and secretary Morris, who were formerly especially admitted of this house, are at this parliament confirmed.
His highness the duke of York is at this parliament called to the
bar
, and also called to the bench.
403
. For
or
a cross gu. read
on
a cross gu.
406
. For azure
sixten millbrinds
read
sixteen
millrinds.
408
. After
a lion rampant
add
purpure.
413
. For
on Sa.
read
and Sa.
413
. On the south side of
Holborn
, near St. Andrew's church, is Thavies-inn. This court took its name from John Thavie, or Tavye, who founded a school of law here in the reign of Edward III. It at present consists of several good houses chiefly occupied by persons connected with the law, but is not accounted
one
of the inns of court.
On the south side of
Fleet-street
is Serjeant's-inn, a handsome square court filled with handsome houses. This place has been long abandoned as an inn of court, but at the east side is a handsome stone building, formerly occupied as the hall of the society, and now as the office of the Amicable Society for life insurances.
478
. In the Borough-road is the extensive school and premises of the British and Foreign School Society.
512
.
Stoney-street
, which runs down to the water-side nearly opposite Dowgate, was probably a part of the great
Watling-street
; and it is generally supposed that somewhere in this neighbourhood was a Roman
trajectus
, or ferry, from the Roman province Cantium to Londinium.
520
Deadman's-place is traditionally said to have taken its name from the number of dead interred there in the great plague.
520
. The memory of our great poet's pilgrimage is perpetuated by an inscription over the gateway:
This is the inn where sir Jeffry Chaucer, and
nine
and
twenty
other pilgrims lodged, in their journey to Canterbury in
1883
.
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 Title Page
 Dedication
CHAPTER I: Site, local divisions, and government of the City of Westminster; history of the Abbey; Coronation Ceremonies; and lists of the Abbots and Deans
CHAPTER II: Westminster Abbey, and Description of the Tombs and Monuments
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of St. Margaret's Parish
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of St. John's Parish, Westminster
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, Westminster
CHAPTER VI: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. James, Westminster
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Anne, Westminster
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Mary-le-strand
CHAPTER X: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. Clement Danes
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of the parish of st. George, Hanover Square
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of the Precinct of the Savoy
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of the Inns of Court
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of the Precincts of the Charter-house and Ely Place, and the Liberty of the Rolls
 CHAPTER XV: Historical Notices of the Borough of Southwark
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Olave, Southwark
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of the parish of St. John, Southwark
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Thomas, Southwark
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. George's, Southwark
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of St. Saviour's Parish
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of the parist of Christ-church in the County of Surrey
 CHAPTER XXII: A List of the Principal Books, &c that have been published in Illustration of the Antiquities, History, Topography, and other subjects treated of in this Work
 Addenda et Corrigienda
 Postscript