The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 4

Allen, Thomas

1827

Drury House.

 

It was built by sir William Drury, an able commander in the Irish wars, in the reign of Elizabeth. During the time of the fatal discontents of the queen's favourite, the earl of Essex, it was the place his imprudent advisers resolved on such counsels as terminated in the destruction of him and his adherents. In the next century it was possessed by the heroic lord Craven, afterwards earl Craven,. who rebuilt it. It was lately a large brick pile, concealed by other buildings, and was a public-house, bearing the sign of the queen of Bohemia's head, the earl's admired mistress, whose battles he fought, animated by love and duty. When he could aspire at her hand, he is supposed to have succeeded; and it is said that they were privately married, and that he built for her the fine seat at Hampstead Marshal, in the county of Berks, afterwards destroyed by fire. The services rendered by the earl to London, his native city in particular, was exemplary. He was so indefatigable in preventing the ravages of the frequent fires of those days, that it was said his very horse smelt it out. He and Monk, duke of Albemarle, heroically staid in town during the dreadful pestilence, and at the hazard of their lives preserved order in the midst of the terrors of the times.

 
 
Footnotes:

[] In Craven Buildings was a very good portrait of this hero, in armour, with a truncheon in his hand, and mounted on his white horse; on each side an earl's and a baron's coronet, and letters W. C. It was painted in fresco, but has been long destroyed. There is a good engraving of it in Smith's Antiquities of London.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
CHAPTER I: Site, local divisions, and government of the City of Westminster; history of the Abbey; Coronation Ceremonies; and lists of the Abbots and Deans
CHAPTER II: Westminster Abbey, and Description of the Tombs and Monuments
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of St. Margaret's Parish
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of St. John's Parish, Westminster
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, Westminster
CHAPTER VI: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. James, Westminster
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Anne, Westminster
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Mary-le-strand
CHAPTER X: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. Clement Danes
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of the parish of st. George, Hanover Square
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of the Precinct of the Savoy
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of the Inns of Court
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of the Precincts of the Charter-house and Ely Place, and the Liberty of the Rolls
 CHAPTER XV: Historical Notices of the Borough of Southwark
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Olave, Southwark
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of the parish of St. John, Southwark
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Thomas, Southwark
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. George's, Southwark
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of St. Saviour's Parish
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of the parist of Christ-church in the County of Surrey
 CHAPTER XXII: A List of the Principal Books, &c that have been published in Illustration of the Antiquities, History, Topography, and other subjects treated of in this Work
 Addenda et Corrigienda
 Postscript