The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 4

Allen, Thomas

1827

Trinity Chapel

 

Trinity Chapel founded by James II. though not, as Mr. Malcolm observes, in the usual manner.

It is well known,

he continues,

that James wished to restore the Roman Catholic religion, which he himself professed; but the general opposition to the measure he met with seems to have had but little weight; and he even endeavoured to force his unwilling subjects by summer encampments of troops on Hounslow-heath, whence he vainly imagined they might be influenced to inflict summary vengeance on the obstinate and heretical Londoners. Part of his policy lay in attempting the conversion of the army; to accomplish which he caused the erection of the original Trinity chapel, constructed of wood, and placed on wheels, that his priests might remove it from

one

situation to another in the camp. The sequel of this bigoted folly need not be repeated.

363

 

The king fled from London and his kingdom; but the chapel on the contrary moved towards the former, and fixed its permanent residence in the then fields, and north end of , where it remained in till , when it perished for wait of proper repairs.

Dr. Tenison, vicar of in the fields, rebuilt it, (after the determination of a suit in Chancery, and a refusal on the part of the commissioners for building new churches to make it the site of of the number,) as a chapel of ease for his numerous parishioners, and for the benefit of the poor.

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Mr. Nightingale observes, If this were all that James did, surely it is too much in Mr. Malcolm, thus roundly to charge him with bigoted folly, merely for building a chapel for the conversion of his soldiers, for what he conceived to be a dangerous error to the true religion.

[] the marker for this footnote does match in text

This object is in collection Subject Temporal Permanent URL
ID:
g158bt43n
To Cite:
DCA Citation Guide    EndNote
Usage:
Detailed Rights
View all images in this book
 Title Page
 Dedication
CHAPTER I: Site, local divisions, and government of the City of Westminster; history of the Abbey; Coronation Ceremonies; and lists of the Abbots and Deans
CHAPTER II: Westminster Abbey, and Description of the Tombs and Monuments
CHAPTER III: History and Topography of St. Margaret's Parish
CHAPTER IV: History and Topography of St. John's Parish, Westminster
CHAPTER V: History and Topography of the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, Westminster
CHAPTER VI: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. James, Westminster
CHAPTER VII: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Anne, Westminster
CHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden
CHAPTER IX: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Mary-le-strand
CHAPTER X: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. Clement Danes
CHAPTER XI: History and Topography of the parish of st. George, Hanover Square
CHAPTER XII: History and Topography of the Precinct of the Savoy
CHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of the Inns of Court
CHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of the Precincts of the Charter-house and Ely Place, and the Liberty of the Rolls
 CHAPTER XV: Historical Notices of the Borough of Southwark
CHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of the Parish of St. Olave, Southwark
CHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of the parish of St. John, Southwark
CHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of the parish of St. Thomas, Southwark
CHAPTER XIX: History and Topogrpahy of the parish of St. George's, Southwark
CHAPTER XX: History and Topography of St. Saviour's Parish
CHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of the parist of Christ-church in the County of Surrey
 CHAPTER XXII: A List of the Principal Books, &c that have been published in Illustration of the Antiquities, History, Topography, and other subjects treated of in this Work
 Addenda et Corrigienda
 Postscript