London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

CLUBS FOLLOW THE FLAG.

 

It may be accepted, I think, that Englishmen are naturally Some little while since I was looking through a small book which purported to give all the clubs in the world. It really contained a

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vast amount of information, but the sum total of the news was this-that Englishmen had their clubs all the world over. It seems the right thing to do. Say that Brown, Jones, and Robinson visit a hitherto undiscovered island. After taking possession of it in the name of the Sovereign they begin to develop it. The operation entails the presence of Smith, Snooks, Jones, and McTab. There comes hundreds more, and after their arrival, thousands. Churches and chapels spring up side by side with shops and factories. Villas begin to appear on the outskirts of what was once a desert, but is now a rising town. Then the following conversation is held.

says Brown,

continues Brown, putting a second question. And then the first in Undiscoverdia is founded. Brown (of the Garrick), Jones (of the Athenaeum), and Robinson (of the Conservative and the St. James's) are the

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first committeemen. Candidates rush in. Some are pilled, and the pilling creates a sensation. In a year or two the club becomes a most flourishing institution. It has a fine house, a good cellar, an imposing hall-porter. In fact, it is a colonial version of

But what does the Frenchman, if he finds himself away from civilisation-that is to say, out of reach of ? He meets his equals at the . He plays dominoes with much skill, and sips absinthe. says Jules. There is a pause. Alphonse is not particularly interested, and Gustave yawns. continues Jules. replies Alphonse. returns Gustave. And so the matter is allowed to drop. It is said that I think we might add as a rider that

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY