London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

REALISING PICTURES.

 

It is a little dangerous to talk of ladies' dresses. Powder always looks well, and it may be conceded that the female representatives of the human race usually appear more charming than their lords if not masters. Still there may be drawbacks to the costumes chosen by our woman kind. If Esmeralda accepts the accompaniment of a goat (either real or stuffed) the disadvantage is obvious; and Marguerite, if she insists upon bringing with her the spinning

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wheel, will also be (as much as any lady can be) a nuisance. Then it is rather embarrassing when a female friend counts upon a well-known picture. If she wears a white wig and carries a flower you may safely suggest -now, by the way, slightly out of date-and a ruff and black velvet are strongly presumptive of a desire to reproduce But when you have hazarded these fairly safe assumptions there is considerable danger in guessing anything else.

a lady asked me (in questionable grammar) not very long ago.

I pondered, and noticed that she was wearing flowing flaxen hair, a brown gown, , and diamonds. I remembered that she had a boy at Eton, and deferentially suggested

she exclaimed.

Then I looked at her once more, and yet again. She had no ruff, so she would not be and her flowing wavy tresses negatived the presumption that she was the Lost Duchess, so I

she replied.

And then I admitted that had I seen the broom I should have had a better chance. And so I should.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY