London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

AN M.P.'S CORRESPONDENCE.

 

I will assume that I am fairly free for this day, at least. I have no measure associated particularly with my name and have only my ordinary correspondence. If my constituency is an important one, I have some fifty or a hundred letters to answer daily. If my division is obscure, I shall still have about a dozen, and each of these epistles must be read and studied and carefully answered. If I had any claims to the title of a I must have a private secretary to assist me. But in this event I must use discretion. My other self must only reply to comparative outsiders. If I instruct him to answer the wrong people, I may get myself into trouble. Constituents are usually and the reputation for the lack of courtesy is frequently the precursor of a sad dearth of votes. Then I must consider the advisability of using in lieu of my own. If my correspondent is in any sense a personal friend, it is better to reply from my private address. If he who writes is only a casual acquaintance or one of the public, I should let my note be headed with in embossed characters; the latter superscription conveys the impression that the writer is, so to speak, tied chronically by the leg to .

I find that my take,

43

at the very least, a couple of hours, and now I have to fix in my social engagements.

I assume that as a speaker in the House I have been a failure, and am, therefore, not much in request at public meetings. Under such circumstances, I shall be free to attend committees, and I may be sure that my availability (if I may be permitted to use the word) will not be ignored by those in authority.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY