London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

THE LION ARTISTIC.

 

If a man is an artist, and he wishes to become a I fancy that his best course is to go in for I frankly admit that I have never learned drawing, still recent compositions on the hoardings and elsewhere have induced me to believe that I might readily secure fame if I were to adopt Out Whistler and out Snooks Snooks. Years ago was said to get his effect by slopping a canvas with a paint mop. Nowadays, impressionists of the new school seem to sprinkle whitewash on preparations of Indian ink. After sprinkling they appear to look at their handiwork with a view to selecting the title. If there are three little spots in the centre of the

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paper, then the sketch can be called if only a blotch appears in the right-hand corner, it may mean or or In fact, the title doesn't matter in the least-one is as good and as appropriate as another. The last few lines may be accepted as a proof that I have and consequently am an incapable critic. Such an expression of opinion (if largely circulated) would be most valuable. If I could but establish my right to the title of I should become a lion and get asked out everywhere. As an artist I feel sure I should command instantaneous success. A monthly periodical called recently attracted considerable attention. It was full of weird drawings, that encouraged me to hope that some day I shall be in the first rank of living artists. I dropped some ink on a piece of paper a day or so ago, and the shape the pigment took was not unsuggestive of a spider or a "daddy long legs." Rightly understood, I have not a doubt that my composition accurately depicts or

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY