London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE.

 

BECAUSE someone called the House of Commons, in a moment of inspiration, the idea has gone abroad that the life of the representative of the people is one of luxurious ease. The fact that a seat in Parliament never (or scarcely ever) goes a-begging, has no doubt done much to confirm the impression. There is a magic in the letters that is particularly attractive to a vast number of men. To a barrister in good practice with an ambition to change the wig of the advocate for the tonsured coiffure of the judge, the position is necessary. As no Lord Mayor of London can occupy the Mansion House without having served the office of Sheriff, so a Q.C. must have worked for his party before he can hope for the chief seat on the Bench. Of course, he may not have succeeded in passing the bar protected by the Serjeant-at-Arms, but at any

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rate, he must have made the attempt. In such a case as this he will find promotion in India or the Colonies, if there be no available appointment in the Mother Country. Then, of course, a Member of Parliament has special claims to the attention of the company promoter. A board of directors can never be considered perfect unless one or two of its members can carry the glamour of the House into the homes of the readers of prospectuses. But, after all, those who materially benefit from their position in St. Stephen's are comparatively few. The vast majority of the chosen of the electors enter the House for It may be well to show the seamy side of the picture, and prove (as an Irish member might observe) that even those of the colleagues of Sir Wilfrid Lawson who do not share that hon. baronet's objection to stimulants, are presumably unable to obtain ; in short, the of rumour may be translated into the of fact.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY