London at the End of the Century:A Book of Gossip

a Beckett, Arthur William

1900

THE LATE LORD TENNYSON AS A VOLUNTEER ARTILLERYMAN.

 

I fancy that if we distinguish amongst the Volunteers we shall find that the gunners are more earnest than their less gifted comrades. I possibly have a slight bias in favour of the gunners, as many years ago I had the honour to command a regiment of Volunteer artillery. It was in the early days of the movement, when batteries, battalions and brigades were small but not particularly compact. My corps consisted of a couple of batteries, with a permission from the War Office to raise a third battery. The regiment had been founded by a gentleman who was connected with literature, and when I took over the command I had amongst my men no less a person than the late Lord . The Poet Laureate never appeared on parade, but he showed his good will to the corps by writing some stirring lines, that were set to music, in praise of the guns. These

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verses were never publicly acknowledged, and were signed but, for all that, they were known to have emanated from the pen that had given to the world I was sorry that I was never able to receive the salute of Gunner , for I am sure he would have looked remarkably well in our uniform. Leaving the H.A.C. out of the question, we were the only regiment of Horse Artillery. As a matter of fact, I do not think we ever appeared in full rig. Although harness was served out to us by the War Office, and we had the right to wear plumes or in our busbies, we never horsed our guns. When I had the honour of taking over the command we were acting as infantry, or perhaps I may say garrison artillery. One of my batteries rejoiced in the possession of a and that was the extent of our ordnance. However, for all that and all that, was on the strength of the regiment, and although he was not exactly we were very proud of him.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE
CHAPTER I: LONDON AT THE END OF THE CENTURY
CHAPTER II: STRANGERS IN LONDON
CHAPTER III: RELIGION IN LONDON
CHAPTER IV: A PEEP INTO STAGELAND
CHAPTER V: PARLIAMENT UP TO DATE
CHAPTER VI: A NIGHT IN THE HOUSE
CHAPTER VII: THE PREMIER CLUB OF ENGLAND
CHAPTER VIII: LONDONERS HOLDING HOLIDAY
CHAPTER IX: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUB
CHAPTER X: IN RATHER MIXED CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XI: IN AUXILIARY CLUBLAND
CHAPTER XII: A PANTOMIME AT DRURY LANE
CHAPTER XIII: LONDON EXHIBITIONS
CHAPTER XIV: COACHING THE UNIVERSITY CREW
CHAPTER XV: THE SEQUEL TO THE DERBY
CHAPTER XVI: THE LONDON GONDOLA
CHAPTER XVII: LONDON ON STRIKE
CHAPTER XVIII: LONDON FIRES
CHAPTER XIX: PALL MALL AND PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINS
CHAPTER XX: CONCERNING THE LONDON VOLUNTEERS
CHAPTER XXI: SERVING WITH THE LONDON MILITIA
CHAPTER XXII: LONDON GUNNERS AT SHOEBURYNESS
CHAPTER XXIII: BECOMING A SOCIETY LION
CHAPTER XXIV: ENTERTAINING THE WORKING MAN
CHAPTER XXV: CHOOSING A FANCY DRESS
CHAPTER XXVI: PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING
CHAPTER XXVII: ART IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXVIII: SPENDING BANK HOLIDAY IN LONDON
CHAPTER XXIX: A BANK HOLIDAY WITHOUT 'ARRY
CHAPTER XXX: LONDON OUT OF TOWN
CHAPTER XXXI: LONDONERS AND THEIR SUMMER HOLIDAYS
CHAPTER XXXII: LONDONERS AND THE CHANNEL
CHAPTER XXXIII: LONDON UNDER DOCTOR'S ORDERS
CHAPTER XXXIV: TWO CITIES IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS
CHAPTER XXXV: THE LONDONER'S SEARCH FOR HEALTH
CHAPTER XXXVI: THE PARISIAN PART OF THE LONDON DISTRICT
CHAPTER XXXVII: A NOVELTY IN LONDON RECREATIONS
CHAPTER XXXVIII: LONDON SCHOOLBOYS AT THE END OF THE CENTURY