London Labour and the London Poor, volume 2

Mayhew, Henry

1851

Of the Working Nightmen and the Mode of Work.

NIGHTWORK, by the provisions of the Police Act, is not to be commenced before at night, nor continued beyond in the morning, winter and summer alike. This regulation is known among the nightmen as the "legal hours," and tends, in a measure, to account for the heterogeneous class of labourers who still seek nightwork; for strong men think little of devoting a part of the night, as well as the working hours of the day, to toil. A rubbish-carter, a very powerfully-built man, told me he was partial to nightwork, and always looked out for it, even when in daily employ, as "it was sometimes like found money." The scavengers, sweeps, dustmen, and labourers known as ground-workers, are anxious to obtain night-work when out of regular employment; and, years and more since, it was often an available and remunerative resource.

Night-work is, then, essentially, and perhaps necessarily, extra-work, rather than a distinct calling followed by a separate class of workers. The generality of nightmen are scavengers, or dustmen, or chimney-sweepers, or rubbishcarters, or pipe-layers, or ground-workers, or coal-porters, carmen or stablemen, or men working for the market-gardeners round London—all either in or out of employment. Perhaps there is not at the present time in the whole metropolis a working nightman who is a working nightman.

It is almost the same with the masternight- men. They are generally masterchimney- sweepers, scavengers, rubbish-carters, and builders. Some of the contractors for the public street scavengery, and the house-dust-bin emptying, are (or have been) among the largest employers of nightmen, but only in their individual trading capacity, for they have no contracts with the parishes concerning the emptying of cesspools; indeed the parish or district corporations have nothing to do with the matter. I have already shown, that among the bestpatronised master-nightmen are now the Commissioners of the Court of Sewers.

For how long a period the master and working chimney-sweepers and scavengers have been the master and labouring nightmen I am unable to discover, but it may be reasonable to assume that this connexion, as a matter of trade, existed in the metropolis at the commencement of the eighteenth century.

The police of Paris, as I have shown, have full control over cesspool cleansing, but the police of London are instructed merely to prevent night-work being carried on at a later or earlier

451

period than "the legal hours;" still a few minutes either way are not regarded, and the legal hours, I am told, are almost always adhered to.

Nightwork is carried on—and has been so carried on, within the memory of the oldest men in the trade, who had never heard their predecessors speak of any other system—after this method:—A gang of men (exclusive of those who have the care of the horses, and who drive the night-carts to and from the scenes of the men's labours at the cesspools) are set to work. The labour of the gang is divided, though not with any individual or especial strictness, as follows:—

. The , who goes into the cesspool and fills the tub.

. The , who raises the tub when filled.

. The (of whom there are ), who carry away the tub when raised, and empty it into the cart.

The mode of work may be thus briefly described:—Within a foot, or even less sometimes, though often as much as feet, below the surface of the ground (when the cesspool is away from the house) is what is called the "main hole." This is the opening of the cesspool, and is covered with flag stones, removable, wholly or partially, by means of the pickaxe. If the cesspool be immediately under the privy, the flooring, &c., is displaced. Should the soil be near enough to the surface, the tub is dipped into it, drawn out, the filth scraped from its exterior with a shovel, or swept off with a besom, or washed off by water flung against it with sufficient force. This done, the tubmen insert the pole through the handles of the tub, and bear it on their shoulders to the cart. The mode of carriage and the form of the tub have been already shown in an illustration, which I was assured by a nightman who had seen it in a shopwindow (for he could not read), was "as nat'ral as life, tub and all."

Thus far, the ropeman and the holeman generally aid in filling the tub, but as the soil becomes lower, the vessel is let down and drawn up full by the ropeman. When the soil becomes lower still, a ladder is usually planted inside the cesspool; the "holeman," who is generally the strongest person in the gang, descends, shovels the tub full, having stirred up the refuse to loosen it, and the contents, being drawn up by the ropeman, are carried away as before described.

The labour is sometimes severe. The tub when filled, though it is never quite filled, weighs rarely less than stone, and sometimes more; "but that, you see, sir," a nightman said to me, "depends on the nature of the sile."

Beer, and bread and cheese, are given to the nightmen, and frequently gin, while at their work; but as the bestowal of the spirit is voluntary, some householders from motives of economy, or from being real or pretended members or admirers of the total-abstinence principles, refuse to give any strong liquor, and in that case—if such a determination to withhold the drink be known beforehand—the employers sometimes supply the men with a glass or ; and the men, when "nothing better can be done," club their own money, and send to some night-house, often at a distance, to purchase a small quantity on their own account. master-nightman said, he thought his men worked best, indeed he was sure of it, "with a drop to keep them up;" another thought it did them neither good nor harm, "in a moderate way of taking it." Both these informants were themselves temperate men, rarely tasting spirits. It is commonly enough said, that if the nightmen have no "allowance," they will work neither as quickly nor as carefully as if accorded the customary gin "perquisite." man, certainly a very strong active person, whose services where quickness in the work was indispensable might be valuable (and he had work as a rubbish-carter also), told me that he for would not work for any man at nightwork if there was not a fair allowance of drink, "to keep up his strength," and he knew others of the same mind. On my asking him what he considered a "fair" allowance, he told me that at least a bottle of gin among the gang of was "looked for, and mostly had, over a gentleman's cesspool. And little enough, too," the man said, "among of us; what it holds if it's public-house gin is uncertain: for you must know, sir, that some bottles has great 'kicks' at their bottoms. But I should say that there's been a bottle of gin drunk at the clearing of every , ay, and more than every , out of cesspools emptied in London; and now that I come to think on it, I should say that's been the case with out of every ."

Some master-nightmen, and more especially the sweeper-nightmen, work at the cesspools themselves, although many of them are men "well to do in the world." master I met with, who had the reputation of being "warm," spoke of his own manual labour in shovelling filth in the same self-complacent tone that we may imagine might be used by a grocer, worth his "plum," who quietly intimates that he will serve a washerwoman with her half ounce of tea, and weigh it for her himself, as politely as he would serve a duchess; for wasn't above his business: neither was the nightman.

On occasion I went to see a gang of nightmen at work. Large horn lanterns (for the night was dark, though at intervals the stars shone brilliantly) were placed at the edges of the cesspool. poles also were temporarily fixed in the ground, to which lanterns were hung, but this is not always the case. The work went rapidly on, with little noise and no confusion.

The scene was peculiar enough. The artificial light, shining into the dark filthy-looking cavern or cesspool, threw the adjacent houses into a deep shade. All around was perfectly still, and there was not an incident to interrupt the labour, except that at time the window of a neighbouring house was thrown up, a night-

452

capped head was protruded, and then down was banged the sash with an impatient curse. It appeared as if a gentleman's slumbers had been disturbed, though the nightmen laughed and declared it was a lady's voice! The smell, although the air was frosty, was for some little time, perhaps minutes, literally sickening; after that period the chief sensation experienced was a slight headache; the unpleasantness of the odour still continuing, though without any sickening effect. The nightmen, however, pronounced the stench "nothing at all;" and even declared it was refreshing!

The cesspool in this case was so situated that the cart or rather waggon could be placed about yards from its edge; sometimes, however, the soil has to be carried through a garden and through the house, to the excessive annoyance of the inmates. The nightmen whom I saw evidently enjoyed a bottle of gin, which had been provided for them by the master of the house, as well as some bread and cheese, and pots of beer. When the waggon was full, horses were brought from a stable on the premises (an arrangement which can only be occasionally carried out) and yoked to the vehicle, which was at once driven away; a smaller cart and horse being used to carry off the residue.

table SHOWING THE NUMBER OF MASTER-SWEEPS, DUST, AND OTHER CONTRACTORS, AND MASTER-BRICKLAYERS, THROUGHOUT THE METRO- POLIS, ENGAGED IN NIGHT-WORK, AS WELL AS THE NUMBER OF CESS- POOLS EMPTIED, AND QUANTITY OF SOIL COLLECTED YEARLY. ALSO THE PRICE PAID TO EACH OPERATIVE PER LOAD, OR PER NIGHT, AND THE TOTAL AMOUNT ANNUALLY PAID TO THE MASTER-NIGHTMEN.
 SWEEPS EMPLOYED AS NIGHTMEN. Number of Cesspools emptied during the year. Quantity of Night-soil collected annually. Number of operative Nightmen employed to empty each Cesspool. Total number of times the working Nightmen are employed during the year. Sum paid to each operative Nightman engaged in removing soil from Cesspools. Total Amount paid to the operative Nightmen during the year. Total Amount paid to Master- Nightmen during the year for emptying Cesspools, at 10s. per load. 
       Loads.     Pence. £ s. d. £ 
 KENSING- TON. Hurd .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Francis ............ 12 72 4 48 6 1 16 0 36 
 Russell ........... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Hough ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 CHELSEA. Burns ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Clements .......... 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Groves ............ 18 108 3 54 6 2 14 0 54 
 Clayton ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Sheppard .......... 14 84 4 56 6 2 2 0 32 
 Nie .............. 16 96 3 48 6 2 8 0 48 
 Haddox ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Albrook ............ 30 180 4 120 7 5 5 0 90 
 WESTMINSTER. Peacock ............ 60 360 4 240 7 10 10 0 180 
 Reiley ............ 40 240 4 160 7 6 13 4 120 
 White .............. 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Ramsbottom ........ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Ness .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Porter ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 4 30 
 Edwards .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Andrews .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Foreman .......... 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 4 30 
 ST. MARTIN'S. Wakefield .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Whateley .......... 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Templeton ........ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Pearce ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 MARYLEBONE. Effery ............ 12 72 3 36 6d. £ 1 16 0 £ 36 
 Brigham .......... 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Ballard ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Pottle ............ 25 150 4 100 7 3 15 0 75 
 Shadwick .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Wilson ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Lewis ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Cuss .............. 30 180 4 120 7 4 10 0 90 
 Wood .............. 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 PADDINGTON. Prichard .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Randall .......... 25 150 3 75 6 3 15 0 75 
 Brown ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Lamb ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Bolton ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Davis .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Rickwood .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 4 
 Elkins ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 HAMP STEAD. Kippin ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Bowden ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 ISLING- TON. Hughes ............ 25 150 3 75 6 3 15 0 75 
 Boven ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Chilcott ............ 25 150 3 75 6 3 15 0 75 
 Baker ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Burrows .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 ST. PANCRAS. Justo .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Neill .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Robinson .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Marriage .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Rose .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Hall .............. 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Jenkins ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Steel .............. 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 Lake .............. 60 360 4 240 7 10 10 0 180 
 Hewlett ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Snell .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 McDonald .......... 30 180 4 120 7 5 5 0 90 
 HACKNEY. Mason ............ 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Clark .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Starkey ............ 25 150 4 100 6 3 15 0 75 
 Attewell .......... 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Brown ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 ST. GILES AND ST. GEORGE'S, BLOOMSBURY. Store .............. 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Richards .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Norris ............ 12 72 3 36 6 3 16 0 36 
 Eldridge .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Davis ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Francis ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Tiney ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Johnson .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Tinsey ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Randall ............ 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 Day .............. 60 360 4 240 7 10 10 0 180 
 STRAND. Catlin ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Richards .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Hutchins .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Barker ............ 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 HOLBORN. Duck .............. 30 180 4 120 7 5 5 0 90 
 Eagle ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Froome ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Smith ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 CLERK EN- WELL. Davis .............. 30 180 3 90 6 4 10 0 90 
 Brown ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Day .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Hawkins .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Grant ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 ST. LUKE'S. Brown ............ 20 120 4 80 7d. £ 3 0 0 £ 60 
 Mawley ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 0 0 60 
 Stevens ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Badger ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Lewis .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 EAST LONDON. Crozier ............ 30 180 4 120 7 5 5 0 90 
 James ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Dawson ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Newell ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Lumley ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Harvey ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 WEST LONDON. Rayment .......... 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Clarke ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 0 0 60 
 Watson ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Desater ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 LONDON, CITY. Tyler and Tyso .... 30 180 4 120 7 5 5 0 90 
 Burgess ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Wilson ............ 20 120 4 80 7 3 10 0 60 
 Potter ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Wright ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 SHOREDITCH. Wells .............. 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Whittle ............ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Collins ............ 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Crew .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Atwood ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Conroy ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Pusey ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 BETHNAL GREEN. Pedrick ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Crosby ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Mull .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Darby ............ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Hall .............. 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 WHITE- CHAPEL. Collins ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Brazier ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Harrison .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Harris ............ 16 96 3 48 6 2 8 0 48 
 Mantz ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 ST. GEORGE-IN-THE- EAST. Whitehead ........ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Rawton ............ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Wrotham .......... 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Harewood .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Rawthorn .......... 25 150 4 100 6 3 15 0 75 
 Darling ............ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Jones .............. 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Johnson .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 BERMONDSEY. Simpson .......... 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Wilkinson .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Goring ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 36 
 Lively ............ 8 48 3 24 6 2 4 0 30 
 Stone .............. 9 54 3 27 6 1 7 0 24 
 Ward .............. 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 24 
 WALWORTH AND NEWINGTON. Kingsbury .......... 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 27 
 Goodge ............ 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 18 
 Wells .............. 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 18 
 Wilks .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 12 
 James ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 45 
 Morgan ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 36 
 Croney ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 30 
 Holmes ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 STEPNEY. Newell ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Fleming .......... 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Tuff .............. 20 120 3 60 6 3 0 0 60 
 Hillingsworth ...... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Smith ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Field .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 POPLAR. Weaver ............ 18 108 3 54 6d. £ 2 14 0 £ 54 
 Strawson .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Culloder .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Ward .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 ST. OLAVE'S, ST. SAVIOUR'S, AND ST. GEORGE'S, SOUTHWARK. Vines .............. 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Humfry ............ 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Young ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 James ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Penn .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Holliday .......... 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Muggeridge ........ 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Alcorn ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Fisher ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Goode ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Smith .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Roberts ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Pilkington .......... 9 54 3 27 6 1 7 0 27 
 Lindsey ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Daycock ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Moulton .......... 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 LAMBETH. Roberts ............ 25 150 4 100 7 4 7 6 75 
 Holland ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Ballard ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Brown ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Mills .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Giles .............. 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Spooner ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Green ............ 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 Barnham .......... 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 Price .............. 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 CHRISTCHURCH, LAMBETH. Plummer .......... 18 108 3 54 6 2 14 0 54 
 Steers ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Clare .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Garlick ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Hudson ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Jones .............. 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 WANDSWORTH & BATTERSEA. Foreman .......... 15 90 3 45 6 2 5 0 45 
 Smith .............. 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
 Giles .............. 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Davis ............ 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Flushman .......... 4 24 3 12 6 0 12 0 12 
 ROTHER- HITHE. Shelley .......... 6 36 3 18 6 0 18 0 18 
 Richardson ........ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Norris ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 Smith ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Dyer ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 GREENWICH & DEPTFORD. Manning .......... 30 180 4 120 6 4 10 0 90 
 Vines ............ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Roseworthy ........ 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Tyler ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Munshin .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 WOOLWICH. Pearce ............ 30 180 4 120 6 4 10 0 90 
 Fiddeman ........ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Sims ............ 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Smithers .......... 12 72 3 36 6 1 16 0 36 
 Rooke ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 James ............ 8 48 3 24 6 1 4 0 24 
 LEWIS- HAM. Ridgeway .......... 20 120 4 80 6 3 0 0 60 
 Binney ............ 10 60 3 30 6 1 10 0 30 
   Total for Sweepnightmen .... 2992 14960 3 & 4 10,062 6 & 7d. 455 15 0 £ 7480 

456

DUST AND OTHER CONTRACTORS ENGAGED AS NIGHTMEN.
     Loads.     Pence. £ s. d. £ s. 
 Darke .................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Cooper ................ 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Dodd .................. 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Starkey ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Williams................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Boyer .................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Gore .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Limpus ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Emmerson.............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Duggins ................ 360 2160 4 1440 8 72 0 0 1134 0 
 Bugbee ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Gould .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Reddin ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Newman ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Tame .................. 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Sinnot.................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Tomkins................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Cordroy ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Samuels ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Robinson .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Bird .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Clarke.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Brown.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Bonner ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Guess .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Jeffries ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Ryan .................. 60 360 4 240 8 12 0 0 189 0 
 Hewitt.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Leimming .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Ellis .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Monk .................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Phillips ................ 250 1000 4 1000 8 33 6 8 525 0 
 Porter .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Dubbins ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Taylor.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Nicholls ................ 250 1000 4 1000 8 33 6 8 525 0 
 Freeman................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Pattison ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Rawlins ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Watkins ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Liddiard................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Farmer ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Francis ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Chadwick .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Perkins ................ 80 480 4 320 8 16 0 0 252 0 
 Culverwell .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Rutty .................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Crook .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 M'Carthy .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Bateman................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Boothe ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Wood .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Calvert ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Tilley .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Abbott ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Potter .................. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Church ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Humphries ............ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Jackson ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Batterbury .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Smith .................. 50 300 4 200 8d. £ 10 0 0 £ 157 10 
 Perkins ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Rose .................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Croot .................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Speller ................ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Piper .................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 North ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Crooker ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Tingey ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Jones .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Whitten ................ 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Webbon ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Ryder .................. 100 600 4 400 8 30 0 0 315 0 
 Wright ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Duckett ................ 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Elworthy................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Slee.................... 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Adams.................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Gutteris ................ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Martainbody ............ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Nicholson .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Mears .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Parsons ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Kenning ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Hooke.................. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Michell ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Walton ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Evans .................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 6 157 10 
 Walker ................ 90 540 4 360 8 18 0 0 283 10 
 Hobman................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Stevens ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Jeffry .................. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Hiscock ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Allen .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Connall ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Waller.................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Mullard ................ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Miller .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Barnes ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Sharpe ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Graham ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Wellard ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Hollis ................. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Fletcher ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Hearne ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Stapleton .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Martin ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Prett and Sewell ........ 300 1800 4 1200 8 60 0 0 945 0 
 Jenkins ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Westley ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Bird.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Gale .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Porter.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Wells .................. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Hall .................. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Kitchener .............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Wickham .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Walker ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Bindy .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Styles .................. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Kirtland ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Kingston .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Eldred ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Rumball ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Mildwater .............. 60 360 4 240 8 12 0 0 189 0 
 Lovell .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Clarkson.............. 150 900 4 600 8d. £ 30 0 0 £ 472 10 
 Rhodes .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Pine ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Monk ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Gabriel .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Packer................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Crawley .............. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Easton................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Marsland ............ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 East.................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Turtle................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Fuller ................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Taylor................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Ginnow .............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Peakes .............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Fleckell .............. 50 300 4 200 8 60 0 0 157 10 
 Cook ................ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Stewart .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Cooper .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Bentley .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Harford .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Litten................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Mills ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Voy .................. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Cortman .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Forster .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Davison .............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Williams........... 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Draper................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Claxton .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Robertson ............ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Cornwall.............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Price ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Milligan .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 West ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Wilson .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Lawn ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Oakes ................ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Joliffe ................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Liley ............... 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 313 0 
 Treagle .............. 120 720 4 480 8 24 0 0 378 0 
 Coleman .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Brooker .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Dignam .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Hillier................ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Simmonds ............ 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Penrose .............. 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Jordan................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Macey ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Williams.............. 150 900 4 600 8 30 0 0 472 10 
 Palmer .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 650 0 
 Anderson ............ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 George .............. 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Hasleton.............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Willis ................ 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Farringdon............ 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Doyle ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Lamb ................ 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Bolton................ 200 1200 4 800 8 40 0 0 630 0 
 Lovelock.............. 250 1500 4 1000 8 50 0 0 787 10 
 Ashfield .............. 50 300 4 200 8 10 0 0 157 10 
 Braithwaite .......... 100 600 4 400 8 20 0 0 315 0 
 Total for Dust and other Contractors engaged as Nightmen .......... 27,820 139,100 4 101,240 8d. £ 5596 13 4 £ 73,027 10 

459

MASTER-BRICKLAYERS ENGAGED AS NIGHTMEN.
     Loads.     Average 2 Cesspools a Night. £ s. d. £ s. 
 Albon ................ 100 600 4 400 5s. ea. 12 10 0 315 0 
 Danver .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Buck ................ 90 540 4 360 " 11 5 0 283 10 
 Aldred................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Bowler .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Deacon .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Barrett .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Elmes................ 90 540 4 360 " 11 5 0 283 10 
 Gray .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Emmerton ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Coleman .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Belchier .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 0 
 Wade ................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Turner .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Sutton................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Cutmore.............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Plowman.............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Brockwell ............ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Bellamy .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Janes ................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Higgs ................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Avery ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Bailey ................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Pitman .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Hosier................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Chambers ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Turner .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Sutton................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Phenix .............. 80 480 4 320 " 10 0 0 252 0 
 Elsden .............. 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Fuller ............... 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Heath ................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Beach ................ 80 480 4 320 " 10 0 0 252 0 
 Jones ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Gilbert .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Green ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 King ................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Parker................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Kelsey................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Palmer .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Sinclair .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Peck ................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Young................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Winter .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Wolfe ................ 90 540 4 360 " 11 5 0 283 10 
 Taber ................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Kellow .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Mercer .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Oswell................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Mallett ............. 90 540 4 360 " 11 5 0 283 10 
 Handley .............. 180 1080 4 720 " 22 10 0 567 0 
 Bull ................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Atkinson.............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Dennis .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Fordham.............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Wigmore.............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Ricketts .............. 300 1800 4 1200 5s. ea. £ 37 10 0 £ 945 0 
 Linnegar.............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Price ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 James ............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Wills ................ 180 1080 4 720 " 22 10 0 567 0 
 Templar .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Tolley ................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Smallman ............ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Macey ................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Livermore ............ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Oakham .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Rudd ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Kerridge ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Perrin ............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Thomas .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Moore ................ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Reeves .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Pearson .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Stollery .............. 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Connew .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Floyd ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Girling .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Gilbert .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 742 10 
 Carter ................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Clayden .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Bibbing .............. 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Dunn ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Howell .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Fursey................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Archer .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Hart ................ 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Cole ................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Essex ................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Hinton .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Wiseman ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Tepner .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Unwin .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Treharne.............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Havenny ............ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Williams ............ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Plant ................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Linfield .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Morris .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Jenkins .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Buck ................ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Hadnutt .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Cuming .............. 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Douglas .............. 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Hogden .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 M'Currey ............ 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Warne................ 50 300 4 200 " 6 5 0 157 10 
 Whitechurch .......... 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Stevenson ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Izard ................ 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Jones ................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Rutley................ 100 600 4 400 " 12 10 0 315 0 
 Prichard ............ 200 1200 4 800 " 25 0 0 630 0 
 Watts ................ 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Woodcock ............ 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Osborn .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Morland .............. 250 1500 4 1000 " 31 5 0 787 10 
 Brown .............. 300 1800 4 1200 " 37 10 0 945 0 
 Hughes .............. 150 900 4 600 " 18 15 0 472 10 
 Total for MasterBrick- layers engaged as Nightmen.......... 19,880 99,400 4 59,520 5s. £ 2,485 0 £ 52,185 0 

461

SUMMARY OF THE ABOVE table.
 MASTER-SWEEPS EMPLOYED AS NIGHTMEN IN Number of Masters employed as Nightmen. Number of Cesspools emptied during the year. Quantity of Night-soil collected annually. Number of working Nightmen employed to each Cesspool. Sum per load paid to each operative Nightman engaged in removing soil from Cesspools. Total Amount paid to Master- Nightmen during the Year for emptying Cesspools. 
       Loads.   Pence. £ s. d. 
 Kensington................ 4 48 240 3 & 4 6 & 7 120 0 0 
 Chelsea .................. 8 140 700 3 & 4 6 & 7 350 0 0 
 Westminster .............. 9 180 900 3 6 450 0 0 
 St. Martin's .............. 4 34 170 3 6 85 0 0 
 Marylebone .............. 9 155 775 3 & 4 6 & 7 387 10 0 
 Paddington ............. 8 107 535 3 6 267 10 0 
 Hampstead................ 2 16 80 3 6 40 0 0 
 Islington.................. 4 82 410 3 6 205 0 0 
 St. Pancras................ 13 226 1,130 3 & 4 6 & 7 565 0 0 
 Hackney.................. 5 89 445 3 & 4 6 & 7 222 10 0 
 St. Giles's and St. George's, Bloomsbury .......... 11 172 860 3 & 4 6 & 7 430 0 0 
 Strand.................... 4 30 150 3 6 75 0 0 
 Holborn .................. 4 74 370 3 & 4 6 & 7 185 0 0 
 Clerkenwell ............ 5 78 390 3 & 4 6 & 7 195 0 0 
 St. Luke's ................ 5 68 340 3 & 4 6 & 7 170 0 0 
 East London .............. 6 92 460 3 & 4 6 & 7 230 0 0 
 West London.............. 4 64 320 3 & 4 6 & 7 160 0 0 
 London, City.............. 5 88 440 3 & 4 6 & 7 220 0 0 
 Shoreditch ................ 7 95 475 3 & 4 6 237 10 0 
 Bethnal-green ............ 5 68 340 3 & 4 6 170 0 0 
 Whitechapel .............. 5 66 330 3 6 165 0 0 
 St. George's-in-the-East .... 8 152 760 3 & 4 6 380 0 0 
 Stepney .................. 6 80 400 3 6 200 0 0 
 Poplar.................... 4 48 240 3 6 120 0 0 
 St. Olave's, St. Saviour's, and St. George's, Southwark .. 16 157 785 3 6 392 10 0 
 Bermondsey .............. 6 60 300 3 6 150 0 0 
 Walworth and Newington .. 8 71 355 3 6 177 10 0 
 Lambeth.................. 10 91 455 3 & 4 6 & 7 227 10 0 
 Christchurch, Lambeth .... 6 58 290 3 6 145 0 0 
 Wandsworth and Battersea.. 5 43 215 3 6 107 10 0 
 Rotherhithe .............. 5 54 270 3 & 4 6 135 0 0 
 Greenwich and Deptford .... 5 94 470 3 & 4 6 & 7 235 0 0 
 Woolwich ................ 6 82 410 3 & 4 6 205 0 0 
 Lewisham ................ 2 30 150 3 & 4 6 75 0 0 
 Total for Sweeps employed as Nightmen .............. 214 2,992 14,960 3 & 4 6 & 7 7,480 0 0 
 Total for Dust and other Contractors employed as Nightmen .................. 188 27,820 139,600 4 8 72,027 0 0 
 Total for Bricklayers employed as Nightmen ............ 119 19,880 99,400 4 5s. a night 52,185 0 0 
 Gross Total ...... 521 50,692 253,960 3 & 4 6d. 7d. & 8d. per 1d. & 5s. per night. 131,692 10 0 

462

A table SHOWING THE QUANTITY OF REFUSE BOUGHT, COLLECTED, OR FOUND, IN THE STREETS OF LONDON.
 Articles bought, collected, or found. Annual gross quantity. Average Number of Buyers, and quantity sold Daily or Weekly. Obtained of the Street Buyers. Price per pound weight, &c. Average Yearly Money Value. Parties to whom sold. 
 REFUSE METAL.                 £ s. d.       
 Copper .................... 291,600 lbs. 200 buyers 1/4 cwt. each weekly ............ 1-500th 6d. per lb. 7,290 0 0 Sold to brass-founders and pewterers. 
 Brass .................... 291,600 " 200 do. 1/4 " do. .................. " 4d. " 4,860 6 8 Do. do.   
 Iron ......................... 2,329,600 " 200 do. 2 " do. .................. 1-200th 1/4d. " 2,426 13 4 Do. to iron-founders and manufacturers, 
 Steel......................... 62,400 " 200 do. 6 lbs. do. .................. none 1d. " 260 0 0 Do. to manufacturers. 
 Lead......................... 1,164,800 " 200 do. 1 cwt. do. .................. 1-500th 1 1/2d. " 7,280 0 0 Do. to brass-founders and pewterers. 
 Pewter......................... 291,600 " 200 do. 1/4 " do. .................. " 5d. " 6,075 13 4 Do. do.   
                   --------------       
                   28,192 13 4       
 HORSE & CARRIAGE FURNITURE.                 --------------       
 Carriages .................... 120 " 4 do. 30 sets yearly ............ none 11l. each 1,320 0 0 Sold to Jew dealers. 
 Wheels (4, from coach-builders) 600 sets 100 do. 8 do. ....................... " 25s. a set 750 0 0 Do. to costers and small tradesmen. 
 Wheels, in pairs for carts & trucks 600 pairs 50 do. 12 pairs yearly .................. " 7s. a pair 210 0 0 Do. do.   
 Springs for trucks and small carts 780 " 5 do. 3 " weekly ............... " 6s. per pair 234 0 0 Do. to costers and others. 
 Lace, from coach-builders..... 1,344 lbs. 12 do. 112 lbs. yearly...................... " 1d. per lb. 5 12 0 Do. to cab-masters and to Jews. 
 Fringe and tassels, from ditto ... 2,688 " 12 do. 224 " do. ...................... " 1/2d. " 5 12 0 Do. to Jews. 
 Coach & carriage linings, singly 156   12 do. 13 yearly ........................ " 25s. each 195 0 0 Do. to cab-masters. 
 Harness (carriage pairs) ..... 60 pairs 10 do. 6 pairs do. ...................... " 3l. per pair 180 0 0 Do. to omnibus proprietors. 
 Ditto (single sets) .......... 144 sets 12 do. 12 sets do. ......................... " 30s. per set 216 0 0 Do, to cab-masters. 
 Ditto (sets of donkey and pony) ... 41,600 " 100 do. 8 sets weekly .................. harness makers 4s. a set 8,320 0 0 Do. to little master harness-makers. 
 Saddles......................... 1,040 " 10 do. 2 " do. ...................... none 4s. " 203 0 0 Do. do.   
 Collars......................... 2,080 " 10 do. 4 " do. ...................... " 9d. " 78 0 0 Do. do. and marine stores. 
 Bridles......................... 4,160 " 10 do. 6 " do. ...................... " 8d. " 138 13 4 Do. do. do. 
 Pads ......................... 2,080 " 10 do. 4 " do. ...................... " 6d. " 52 0 0 Do. do.   
 Bits ......................... 4,160 " 10 do. 3 " do. ...................... " 2d. " 34 13 4 Do. do. do. 
 Leather (new cuttings from coachbuilders) .................... 58,136 lbs. 24 do. 22 cwt. yearly .................. " 4d. " 985 12 0 Do. to Jews and also to gunsmiths. 
 Ditto (morocco cuttings from do.) 960 " 20 do. 48 " do. ......................... " 1s. 6d. " 72 0 0 Do. to tailors' trimming-sellers. 
 Old leather (waste from ditto) ... 53,760 " 12 do. 20 " do. ......................... " 2 1/2d. " 560 0 0 Do. to Jews. 
                   --------------       
                   13,560 2 8       
 REFUSE LINEN, COTTON, &c.                 --------------       
 Rags (woollen, consisting of tailors' shreds, old flannel drugget, carpet, and moreen) .... 4,659,200 lbs. 200 do. 4 " weekly .................. 1-1000th 1/2d. per lb. 9,706 13 4 Sold for manure and to nail up fruit-trees. 
 Ditto (coloured cotton) ...... 2,912,000 " 200 do. 2 1/2 " do. ...................... 1-500th 1/2d. " 6,066 13 4 Do. to paper-makers and for quilts. 
 Ditto (white) .................... 1,164.800 " 200 do. 1 " do. ...................... 1-1000th 2d. " 9,706 13 4 Do. to paper-makers. 
 Canvas......................... 44,800 " 200 do. 2 " yearly .................. none 1d. " 186 13 4 Do. to chance customers. 
 Rope and sacking .................. 291,200 " 200 do. 1/4 " weekly .................. 1-500th 1/2d. " 606 13 4 Do. for oakum and sacking to mend old sacks. 
                   --------------       
                   36,898 13 4       
 PAPER.                 --------------       
 Waste paper .................... 1,397,760 " 60 colls. each disposing of 4 cwt. weekly all 18s. per cwt. 11,232 0 0 Do. to shopkeepers. 
 GLASS AND CROCKERYWARE.                             
 Bottles (common and doctors') ... 62,400 doz. 200 buyers, 24 weekly ......................... 1-100th 2d. per doz. 520 0 0 Do. to doctors and chemists. 
 Ditto (wine) .................... 31,200 " 200 do. 12 do. ........................ 1-200th 6d. " 780 0 0 Do. to Brit. wine merchants & ale stores. 
 Ditto (porter and stout) ........ 4,800 " 200 do. 24 dozen yearly.................. none 6d. " 120 0 0 Do. to ale and porter stores. 
 Flint glass .................... 15,600 lbs. 200 do. 1 1/2 lbs. weekly.................. 1-1000th 1/4d. per lb. 16 5 0 Do. to glass manufacturers. 
 Pickling jars .................... 7,200 " 200 do. 36 yearly......................... none 3/4d. each 22 10 0 Do. to Italian warehouses, &c. 
 Gallipots ......................... 20,800 doz. 200 do. 24 weekly ...................... " 2d. per doz. 173 6 8 Do. do.   
                   --------------       
                   1,632 1 8       
                   --------------       
 REFUSE APPAREL.                             
 Coats ......................... 624,000   300 colls each. purchasing 8 coats daily bt. of old clo'men 6s. each 187,200 0 0 Sold to old clo'men and wholesale dealers. 
 Trousers......................... 312,000 pairs 300 do. do. 4 pr. trousers do. " 3s. 3d. per pr. 50,700 0 0 Do. do.   
 Waistcoats ...................... 312,000   300 do. do. 3 waistcoats do. " 7d. each 9,100 0 0 Do. do.   
 Under-waistcoats .................. 46,800   300 do. do. 3 weekly............ " 2d. " 390 0 0 Do. to wholesale and wardrobe dealers. 
 Breeches and gaiters .......... 15,600 pairs 300 do. do. 1 pair weekly ...... " 2s. per pair 1,560 0 0 Do. to old clo'men and wholesale dealers. 
 Dressing-gowns.................. 3,000   100 do. do. 30 yearly ............ " 4s. 2d. each 625 0 0 Do. to wholesale and wardrobe dealers. 
 Cloaks (men's) ................. 1,000   100 do. do. 10 cloaks yearly ...... " 10s. " 500 0 0 Do. to wholesale dealers. 
 Boots and shoes.................. 1,560,000 pairs 100 do. do. 60 pairs daily .......... " 7d. per pair 45,500 0 0 Do. to wardrobe dealers and secondhand boot and shoe makers. 
 Boot and shoe soles ............ 648,000 dz. pr 100 do. each collecting 30 dz. pr. daily none 1s. per dz. pr. 32,400 0 0 Do. to Jews and gunsmiths to temper gun-barrels. 
 Boot legs...................... 520,000 " " 200 do. do. 50 " weekly " 5s. " 130,000 0 0 Do. to translators. 
 Hats ......................... 1,879,000   300 colls. each purchasing 24 hats daily bt. of old clo'men 4d. each 31,200 0 0 Do. to dealers and master hatters. 
 Boys' suits .................. 3,600   300 do. do. 12 suits yearly.......... " 3s. a suit 540 0 0 Do. Jew dealers. 
 Shirts and chemises............ 626,400   300 do. do. 8 daily .................. " 4d. each 10,400 0 0 Do. to old clo'men and wholesale dealers. 
 Stockings of all kinds .......... 783,000 pairs 100 do. do. 30 pair daily ......... " 1d. per pair 3,272 10 0 Do. to wholesale and wardrobe dealers. 
 Drawers (men's and women's) ... 93,600 " 300 do. do. 6 " weekly ...... " 3d. " 1,170 0 0 Do. do.   
 Women's dresses of all kinds..... 496,800   300 do. do. 6 dresses daily ...... " 1s. 9d. each 41,107 10 0 Do. do.   
 Petticoats .................. 939,600   300 do. do. 12 daily................. " 7d. " 27,405 0 0 Do. do.   
 Women's stays ............ 261,000 pairs 100 do. do. 10 pair do. ............ " 5d. per pair 5,437 10 0 Do. do.   
 Children's shirts ............ 187,920   60 do. do. 12 daily.................. " 3d. a doz. 195 15 0 Do. do.   
 Ditto petticoats .............. 261,000   200 do. do. 5 do. .................. " 1 1/2d. each 1,639 11 8 Do. do.   
 Ditto frocks .................. 522,000   200 do. do. 10 do. .................. " 4d. " 8,700 0 0 Do. do.   
 Cloaks (women's), capes, visites, &c 5,200   20 do. do. 5 cloaks weekly ... " 4s. " 1,040 0 0 Do. to wholesale dealers. 
 Bonnets ......................... 1,409,400   150 do. do. 3 doz. daily ......... " 6d. " 35,235 0 0 Do. do.   
 Shawls of all kinds ............ 469,800   300 do. do. 6 daily................ " 1s. 2d. " 27,405 0 0 Do. to wholesale and wardrobe dealers. 
 Fur boas and victorines .......... 261,000   100 do. do. 10 do. .................. " 1s. 2d. " 15,220 0 0 Do. do.   
 Fur tippets and muffs ............ 130,500   100 do. do. 5 do. .................. " 1s. 2d. " 7,612 10 0 Do. do.   
 Umbrella and parasol frames...... 518,400   200 do., each collecting 12 daily ......... all 5d. " 10,300 0 0 Do. to Jews and old umbrella menders. 
                   --------------       
                   675,555 6 8       
 HOUSEHOLD REFUSE.                 --------------       
 Tea-leaves .................. 78,000 lbs.   ... ... ... ... " 2 1/2d. per lb. 812 10 0 Do. to merchants to re-make into tea. 
 Fish-skins .................. 3,900 " 25 do. do. 2 lbs. weekly for costers and 1d. "       Do. to brewers to fine their ale. 
         6 months. fishmongers   16 5 0       
 Hare-skins .................. 80,000   50 do. do. 50 weekly............... all 1s. a doz. 333 6 8 Do. to Jews, hatters, and furriers. 
 Kitchen-stuff ............... 62,400 lbs. 200 do. do. 6 lbs. weekly ......... none 1 1/2d. per lb. 390 0 0 Do at marine stores. 
 Dripping ...................... 52,000 " 200 do. do. 5 " do. ......... " 3d. " 650 0 0 Do. do.   
 Bones ......................... 3,494,400 " 200 buyers 3 cwt. weekly .................. 1-1000th 1/4d. " 105,625 0 0 Do. for manure, knife-handles, &c. 
 Hogwash...................... 2,504,000 gals. 200 do., each purchasing 40 gal. daily ... all 1d. per gallon 10,433 6 8 Do. to pig-dealers. 
 Dust (from houses) ............ 900,000 loads   ... ... ... ... none 2s. 6d. per 1d. 112,500 0 0 Do. for manure and to brickmakers. 
 Soot ......................... 800,000 bush. 800 colls. each collectg. 19 bush. weekly " 5d. per bushel 16,666 13 4 Do. to farmers, graziers, and gardeners. 
 Soil (from cesspools) .......... 750,000 loads   ... ... ... ... " 10s. per load 375,000 0 0 Do. for manure. 
                   --------------       
                   622,427 1 8       
 STREET REFUSE.                 --------------       
 Street sweepings (scavengers') ... 140,983 " 444 do. the whole " 452 lds. daily ...... " 3s. " 21,147 9 0 Do. do.   
 Ditto (street orderlies') .......... 2,817 " 546 do. do. " 9 " do. ...... " 2s. 6d. " 2,352 2 6 Do. do.   
 Coal and coke (mudlarks') ...... 64,656 cwt. 550 do., each collecting 42 lbs. do. ...... " 8d. per cwt. 2,151 17 4 Do. to the poor. 
 "Pure" ...................... 52,000 pails 200 do. do. 5 pails weekly " 1s. per pail 2,600 0 0 Do. to tanners and leather-dressers. 
 Cigar ends .................. 2,240 lbs. 50 do. do. 8 1/2 lbs. do. ... street-finders 8d. per lb. 74 13 4 Do. to Jews in Rosemary-lane. 
                   --------------       
                   28,326 2 2       
                   --------------       
                 Gross Total ... 1,406,592 1 6       

464

 

Curious and ample as this Table of Refuse is —, moreover, perfectly original—it is not sufficient, by the mere range of figures, to convey to the mind of the reader a full comprehension of the ramified vastness of the -Hand trade of the metropolis. Indeed tables are for reference more than for the current information to be yielded by a history or a narrative.

I will, therefore, offer a few explanations in elucidation, as it were, of the tabular return.

I must, as indeed I have done in the accompanying remarks, depart from the order of the details of the table to point out, in the instance, the particulars of the greatest of the -Hand trades—that in Clothing. In this table the reader will find included every indispensable article of man's, woman's, and child's apparel, as well as those articles which add to the ornament or comfort of the person of the wearer; such as boas and victorines for the use of sex, and dressing-gowns for the use of the other. The articles used to protect us from the rain, or the too-powerful rays of the sun, are also included—umbrellas and parasols. The whole of these articles exceed, when taken in round numbers, millions and a quarter, and that reckoning the "pairs," as in boots and shoes, &c., as but article. This, still pursuing the round-number system. would supply nearly articles of refuse apparel to every man, woman, and child in this, the greatest metropolis of the world.

I will put this matter in another light. There are about Jews in England, nearly half of whom reside in the metropolis. , it is further stated on good authority, reside within the City of London. Now at time the trade in old clothes was almost entirely in the hands of the City Jews, the others prosecuting the same calling in different parts of London having been "Wardrobe Dealers," chiefly women, (who had not unfrequently been the servants of the aristocracy); and even these wardrobe dealers sold much that was worn, and (as old clothes-dealer told me) much that was "not, for their fine customers, because the fashion had gone by," to the "Old Clo" Jews, or to those to whom the streetbuyers carried their stock, and who were able to purchase on a larger scale than the general itinerants. Now, supposing that even of these Israelites were engaged in the old-clothes trade (which is far beyond the mark), each man would have articles to dispose of yearly, all -hand!

Perhaps the most curious trade is that in waste paper, or as it is called by the street collectors, in "waste," comprising every kind of used or useless periodical, and books in all tongues. I may call the attention of my readers, by way of illustrating the extent of this business in what is proverbially refuse "waste paper," to their experience of the penny postage. or sheets of note paper, according to the stouter or thinner texture, and an envelope with a seal or a glutinous and stamped fastening, will not exceed half-an-ounce, and is conveyed to the Orkneys and the further isles of Shetland, the Hebrides, the Scilly and Channel Islands, the isles of Achill and Cape Clear, off the western and southern coasts of Ireland, or indeed to and from the most extreme points of the United Kingdom, and no matter what distance, provided the letter be posted within the United Kingdom, for a penny. The weight of waste or refuse paper annually disposed of to the street collectors, or rather buyers, is lbs. Were this tonnage, as I may call it, for it comprises tons yearly, to be distributed in half-ounce letters, it would supply material, as respects weight, for letters on business, love, or friendship.

I will next direct attention to what may be, by perhaps not over-straining a figure of speech, called "the crumbs which fall from the rich man's table;" or, according to the quality of the commodity of refuse, of the tables of the rich, and that down to a low degree of the scale. These are not, however, unappropriated crumbs, to be swept away uncared for; but are objects of keen traffic and bargains between the possessors or their servants and the indefatigable street-folk. Among them are such things as champagne and other wine bottles, porter and ale bottles, and, including the establishments of all the rich and the comparative rich, kitchen-stuff, dripping, hog-wash, hare-skins, and tea-leaves. Lastly come the very lowest grades of the street-folk—the men who will quarrel, and have been seen to quarrel, with a hungry cur for a street-found bone; not to pick or gnaw, although Eugène Sue has seen that done in Paris; and I once, very early on a summer's morning, saw some apparently houseless Irish children contend with a dog and with each other for bones thrown out of a house in , City—as if after a very late supper—not to pick or gnaw, I was saying, but to for manure. Some of these finders have "seen better days;" others, in intellect, are little elevated above the animals whose bones they gather, or whose ordure ("pure"), they scrape into their baskets.

I do not know that the other articles in the arrangement of the table of street refuse, &c., require any further comment. Broken metal, &c., can only be disposed of according to its quality or weight, and I have lately shown the extent of the trade in such refuse as streetsweepings, soot, and night-soil.

The gross total, or average yearly money value, is for the -hand commodities I have described in the foregoing pages; or as something like a minimum is given, both as to the number of the goods and the price, we may fairly put this total at a million and a half of pounds sterling!

 
This object is in collection Temporal Permanent URL
ID:
rv043431c
Component ID:
tufts:UA069.005.DO.00078
To Cite:
DCA Citation Guide    EndNote
Usage:
Detailed Rights
View all images in this book
 Title Page
 INTRODUCTION
Of the Street-Sellers of Second-Hand Articles
Of the Street-Sellers of Live Animals
Of the Street-Sellers of Mineral Productions and Natural Curiosities
Of the Street-Buyers
Of the Street-Jews
Of the Street-Finders or Collectors
Of the Streets of London
Of the London Chimney-Sweepers
Of the London Chimney-Sweepers
Of the Sweepers of Old, and the Climbing Boys
Of the Chimney-Sweepers of the Present Day
Of the General Characteristics of the Working Chimney-Sweepers
Sweeping of the Chimneys of Steam-Vessels
Of the 'Ramoneur' Company
Of the Brisk and Slack Seasons, and the Casual Trade among the Chimney- Sweepers
Of the 'Leeks' Among the Chimney-Sweepers
Of the Inferior Chimney-Sweepers -- the 'Knullers' and 'Queriers'
Of the Fires of London
Of the Sewermen and Nightmen of London
Of the Wet House-Refuse of London
Of the Means of Removing the Wet House-Refuse
Of the Quantity of Metropolitan Sewage
Of Ancient Sewers
Of the Kinds and Characteristics of Sewers
Of the Subterranean Character of the Sewers
Of the House-Drainage of the Metropolis as Connected With the Sewers
Of the London Street-Drains
Of the Length of the London Sewers and Drains
Of the Cost of Constructing the Sewers and Drains of the Metropolis
Of the Uses of Sewers as a Means of Subsoil Drainage
Of the City Sewerage
Of the Outlets, Ramifications, Etc., of the Sewers
Of the Qualities, Etc., of the Sewage
Of the New Plan of Sewerage
Of the Management of the Sewers and the Late Commissions
Of the Powers and Authority of the Present Commissions of Sewers
Of the Sewers Rate
Of the Cleansing of the Sewers -- Ventilation
Of 'Flushing' and 'Plonging,' and Other Modes of Washing the Sewers
Of the Working Flushermen
Of the Rats in the Sewers
Of the Cesspoolage and Nightmen of the Metropolis
Of the Cesspool System of London
Of the Cesspool and Sewer System of Paris
Of the Emptying of the London Cesspools by Pump and Hose
Statement of a Cesspool-Sewerman
Of the Present Disposal of the Night-Soil
Of the Working Nightmen and the Mode of Work
Crossing-Sweepers