Margaret Henderson Floyd Architectural Slide Collection, 1955 -- 1998

Overview

Title: Margaret Henderson Floyd Architectural Slide Collection
Dates: 1955 -- 1998
Creator: Floyd, Margaret H.
Call Number: MS175
Size: 16.0 Cubic Feet, 40 boxes
Language(s): English  
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10427/012428
Location:
    Digital Collections and Archives, Tufts University
    archives@tufts.edu
    http://sites.tufts.edu/dca/

Description

This collection contains correspondence, photographs, postcards, slide inventories, slides, and travel itinerary notes. Materials in this collection are dated from 1955 to 1998. Professor Margaret Henderson Floyd used these slides in classroom instruction and for her research: they depict buildings, rooms, architects, terra cotta items, sculptures, and paintings from the United States, Central America, and Europe (such as England, Germany, and Italy). These slides also depict images from various books.

Arrangement

This collection has one series.

Biography/History

Biographical / Historical

Margaret Henderson Floyd (1932-1997) was a professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Tufts University from 1977 until 1997.

Born in New York City, Floyd graduated from Wellesley College with a BA in Art History in 1953. She went on to receive a master's degree in Art History from the University of New Mexico in 1957, and earned her Ph.D. in American Studies from Boston University in 1974.

At Tufts, Floyd taught courses on architectural history and American art. One of her most popular courses focused on Boston and Cambridge architecture. In 1981, Floyd was appointed to the Campus Planning and Development Committee by Dean Frank Colcord. In 1983, she began work on an architectural inventory of university buildings for the committee. She also served as chair of the Fine Arts Department from 1983 to 1987, when she was involved in establishing Tufts University Art Gallery.

Floyd gave frequent walking tours of Boston, and an annual architectural tour of Newport, R.I. mansions. She was active in local historic preservation projects and involved with the Boston Architectural Center. Her published works include Harvard: An Architectural History (co-authored with Bainbridge Bunting, 1985); Architectural Education and Boston (1989); Architecture after Richardson: Regionalism before Modernism--Longfellow, Alden, and Harlow in Boston and Pittsburgh (1994); and Henry Hobson Richardson: A Genius for Architecture (1997).

Margaret Henderson Floyd died of cancer on October 18, 1997. The Department of Art and Art History established the Margaret Henderson Floyd Memorial Lecture (1999) and the Architectural Studies Prize (2006) in her honor.

Access and Use

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions

Some material in this collection may be protected by copyright and other rights. Please see "Reproductions and Use" on the Digital Collections and Archives website for more information about reproductions and permission to publish. No documentation is available regarding the intellectual property rights in this collection.

Collection History

Processing Notes

For processing notes and instructions (fall 2011), see also paper collection documentation folder.

After the Floyd family transferred the binders to the Art History Department, many slides were removed. They were used for classroom teaching and were subsequently filed in the overall slide collection of the Art History Department where they still remain to this day. That means that many binder slide pockets were empty when binders were transferred to DCA. Because the Art History Department's Access database is not functioning as of January 2011, Floyd slides that were integrated into the department's overall slide collection cannot be identified. DCA was therefore unable to restore the binders' original content. In addition, Floyd's original order and labeling cannot be reconstructed: the numerical order (number 1-40) of the binders and many labels and lists were created after her death.

DCA decided to treat the binders' numerical arrangement as 'original order' created by the Art History Department after DCA had been unable to get information from Floyd family members and previous Art History staff as to the original order of the slides under Prof. Floyd's care. During processing, slides were removed from binders; the slides of a particular binder were stored in an individual box. Slides were transfered from their plastic enclosures to archival preservation slide sheets.

Slides in boxes (i.e. originally binders) numbered 27 through 29 were all coded EG 1, EG2, EG3 (English Geography 1 through 3). Those slides were therefore moved to their appropriate boxes (i.e. English Geography box 1, box 2, or box 3). Index sheets created by the Art History Department after 1997 are therefore no longer accurate (see note below).

We were able to identify the following acronyms that were used on black binder labels or were directly noted on the slides: USGEO (US Geography); AA (American Architecture or Architects); S&B (Sturgis & Brigham); EG (English Geography); EA (English Architects or Architecture); LAH (Longfellow, Alden & Harlow); P + S (painting and sculpture). We were not able to decipher the following acronyms: MBL (e.g. box 14), HHR (box 21), PGH (box 18), DA and SC and Dec (all box 38), DA (box 39), AG (could be AG1 or AG2 or AG, meaning unclear: it could be American Geography. However AG is usually only used in some but not all binders with Massachusetts material).

We currently assume that Floyd organized her slides by these acronyms in order to have slides ready for particular lectures e.g. about American architecture in a particular state or country. Since acronyms were also used on the black binder labels, these labels were preserved during processing. We peeled them off, taped them to a sheet of paper and preserved the sheet in the first folder of each box next to any index sheets that the Art History Department had created after 1997 for many binders; Art History index sheets did not always accurately reflect content of a binder. It is very likely that Floyd had created a card index for her slides and acronyms but the Art History Department has not been able to locate the card catalog. Processing supervised by Susanne Belovari 2010.

This collection is processed.

Custodial History

In the fall of 2010, the Art History Department transferred 40 binders to DCA. These binders contained slides that Margaret Henderson Floyd (1932-1997) had used for teaching (see collection documentation for more information). After her death, Floyd's family transferred the forty binders to the Art History Department at Tufts (transfer date unclear).

Since that time, many slides were removed from the binders for use in classroom teaching and were then filed in the overall slide collection of the Art History Department where they still remain to this day. Therefore, many/most binder slide pockets were empty when transferred to DCA. Because the Art History Department's Access database is not functioning as of January 2011, Floyd slides that were integrated into the department's overall slide collection cannot be identified. DCA was therefore unable to restore the binders' original content. In addition, Floyd's original order and labeling cannot be reconstructed: the numerical order (number 1-40) of the binders and many labels and lists were created after her death.

Subjects and Genre Terms

Series Description

  1. Architectural slides, 1955 -- 1998

    This series contains 40 boxes. Each box contains the slides of one slide binder transferred to DCA in the fall of 2010. Most slides are not dated: the date range is approximate.

    Professor Margaret Henderson Floyd used these slides in the classroom and for her research. They were either bought commercially (usually indicated on the frame) or were taken by Floyd and others. Because the photographers are usually not identified on individual slides, copyright will be a major issue for this collection.

    Slides depict buildings, rooms, and architects but also terra cotta items, sculptures and paintings from the United States, Central America, and Europe as well as reproductions from books such as architectural drawings or portraits (most books are not clearly identified); also included are a few photographs, post cards, some correspondence and travel itinerary notes.

    See processing notes for provenance, original order, and decisions regarding labeling the collection.