Qualifying papers, 2007 -- 2014

This series is part of Department of Education Records, 1954 -- 2014

Series Overview

Title: Qualifying papers
Dates: 2007 -- 2014
Call Number: UA071.001
Size: 26 Digital Object(s)

Description

This series contains selected papers submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for various degree programs in the Department of Education.

Arrangement

This series is arranged alphabetically by author.

Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open for research.

View Online Materials

Some of the materials from this collection are available online. Not all materials have necessarily been digitized.

Detailed Contents List


  Title Request Materials
 
From Functions as Process to Functions as Object: A Review of Reification and Encapsulation 2007-02-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education. Abstract: This qualifying paper explores the processes of reification (Sfard, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992) and encapsulation (Dubinsky, 1991a, 1991b; Dubinsky & Harel, 1992a), as they apply to the concept of mathematical functions, and attempts to determine how both processes contribute to explaining the formation of the concept of function. The review of empirical studies on students' understanding of functions leads to the conclusion that neither reification nor encapsulation is without flaw; however, they have contributed significantly to partially explaining the formation of the function concept. This implies that more theoretical and empirical work needs to be conducted within this area in order for researchers and educators to have a complete explanation of the formation of the function concept.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00001
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Numerical Notation and the Place-Value Concept in Young Children 2007-02-02

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctoral program in MSTE Education. Abstract: In recent decades, we have come to accept that children's appropriation of written numbers is not automatic or simple. Various studies of children's use of notation point to several different types of notational practice possibly linked to stages in the understanding of place value in base-ten (Alvara001, 2002; Brizuela, 2004; Scheuer et al, 2000; Seron & Fayol, 1994). Scheuer et al (2000) discuss two distinct types of incorrect numerical notation strategies used by children: logogramic and compacted notation. Logogramic notation refers to children who write the entire number literally, such as 100701 for one hundred seventy-one. Compacted notation refers to children who remove some of the zeros from the logogramic coding while still not condensing the number entirely into its conventional form, such as 1071 for one hundred seventy-one. Scheuer speculates that perhaps these two types of notational strategies stem from different conceptual ideas about the numbers themselves, yet the study does not explore these ideas, focusing only on written numbers. The study described in this paper examines Scheuer's arguments by comparing numerical notation strategies with children's performance on a task of decomposing numbers created by valued tokens that will provide insights into the children's ideas.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00002
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Developing Middle School Engineering Teachers: Toward Expertise in Engineering Subject Matter and Pedagogical Content Knowledge 2007-02-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the program in MSTE Education. Abstract: The purpose of this review is to examine various educational constructs and explore links to developing middle school engineering teachers. In our technical society today, learning and teaching engineering is becoming more and more important. National and state standards are beginning to include engineering content standards for K-12 classrooms. If teachers are going to begin teaching engineering they will, undoubtedly, need some preparation before they begin. In this review, I look at subject matter knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expertise and discuss how what has already been done in other fields such as math and science education can be used to inform future development of teaching engineering in the middle school classroom. Conclusions about how subject matter knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge impact teaching and learning along with insights from expertise literature are used to provide guidance for future research and potential professional development implications.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00003
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Research Perspectives on the Teaching and Learning of Algebra 2008-08-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education. Abstract: In this paper I will discuss different approaches to algebra adopted by researchers studying teaching and learning of algebra in the last thirty years (1977-2006). For each study reviewed in this paper, the goals are: to identify the central aspects of algebra (for example, algebra as the study of functions or algebra as the study of equation-solving), the mathematical problems researchers propose to use for teaching algebra and for evaluating learning, the used theoretical concepts, and main findings. In addition, I will provide a brief history of the evolution of the field of research on the teaching and learning of algebra, will discuss notions such as the role of equation solving techniques versus meaning making in the teaching and learning of algebra, the relation between arithmetic and algebra, algebra as a modeling tool, and the relation between algebra and proof.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00004
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Middle-School Teachers' Use and Development of Engineering Subject Matter and Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Pilot Study 2008-04-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in MSTE Education. Abstract: This paper reports on a study of two middle-school math and one middle-school science teacher as they taught an engineering unit. The study investigated the subject matter knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge these teachers used and developed as they taught an engineering unit that used LEGO to teach students the engineering design process through designing and building an assistive device that uses motors, sensors, and is computer controlled. Data collected from teacher interviews and classroom observations revealed the different subject matter and pedagogical content knowledge the teachers used to teach engineering that was new for them. The data revealed how a teacher's knowledge of physics or engineering can impact their teaching. The data also highlighted that the teachers rarely explicitly used their math or science knowledge to make connections to engineering. The study also illustrated examples of engineering pedagogical content knowledge the teachers developed while teaching the engineering unit. One central conclusion drawn from the study is that teachers would benefit from focused opportunities to develop the different specific types of engineering knowledge that they struggle with the most (i.e., physics concepts, mathematics principles, engineering design). The paper includes a literature review that provides a rationale and framework for studying the teaching of middle-school engineering, a description of the methods used, and results and implications of this study.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00005
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The Impact of Engineering Education at the Kindergarten to High School Levels: A Review of Research 2008-07-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Education. Abstract: The aim of this review is to describe a selection of international research efforts in Kindergarten through Grade 12 (K-12) engineering education in order to define an organizing framework for the impact of engineering education on students' development of technological literacy, learning of math and science content, and motivation and understanding of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. A considerable and renewed interest in the field of K-12 engineering education in the United States (US) motivates the need for sharing theoretically grounded research (Benenson, 2001; De Miranda, 2004; Householter, 2000; Norman and Roberts, 2001; Pellegrino, 1999; Zuga, 2000).
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00006
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Integrating Algebra and Proof in High School Students' Work with Algebraic Expressions Involving Variables When Proving 2008-05-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education. Abstract: The overarching research question of the study described in this paper is: what are the consequences of an integrated approach to algebra and proof on students' mathematical knowledge while they work through a didactical sequence (i.e., the "Calendar Sequence")? In particular, the goal of this paper is to report on the challenges that students faced in their work with variables, and equivalent expressions while engaged in producing and proving conjectures, and how these challenges were overcome. Previous studies on algebra and proof (Barallobres, 2004; Bell, 1993) are scant nonetheless promising in regards to students' production of proofs using algebra in an integrated approach. I claim that the results presented in this paper provide promising evidence that an integrated approach towards algebra and proof, such as that implemented in the Calendar Sequence, has a positive impact on students' use of algebra as a tool to prove.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00007
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Challenges and Promising Approaches in the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Physics at the Secondary Level 2008

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education. Abstract: The purpose of this review is to identify the challenges facing secondary teachers of physics, to explore the most common instructional methods currently in use and to propose future research that will lean heavily on the use of peer collaboration to foster strong conceptual change. Through this review, I will argue that: (1) Strong conceptual change or restructuring is needed for high school students to develop as Newtonian thinkers; ( 2) Peer-to-peer verbal interactions may have an important role to play in this process; (3) Combined quantitative and qualitative studies, at the secondary level, are needed to contribute to our understanding of this process for students enrolled in introductory physics courses; and (4) Careful analysis of interaction transcripts will be necessary to inform our understanding of the mechanism involved in conceptual restructuring in this setting.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00008
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The Effect of Structured Peer-to-Peer Interactions on Conceptual Understanding of DC Resistive Circuits in Secondary Physics 2008-06-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education. Abstract: This study examined the prevalence and persistence of some common misconceptions about DC resistive circuits and the role of social interaction in promoting changes in students' views. It explored the types of interactions that were common in student dialogues as they discussed conceptual questions and whether the number of correct responses to these conceptual questions significantly increased as a result of discussions with peers. Analysis of interactions revealed that the most common student statements during the discussion phase could be characterized as either simply stating their answer or as providing the reasoning behind their answer choice.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00009
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The Theoretical and Empirical Basis for Design-Based Science Instruction for Children 2008-03-24

A qualifying paper. Abstract: My primary goal in this paper is to report comprehensively on the current state of design-based science instruction for children. I will review and synthesize theoretical and empirical literature in an attempt to assist educators, researchers, and developers in their efforts to define effective approaches to design-based science instruction for upper elementary students. My focus is on upper elementary-school students (roughly eight- to eleven-year-olds) because due to their young age, these students are most likely to be influenced by novel instructional activities such as design-based science.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00010
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Learning-By-Teaching as a Pedagogical Approach and Its Implications on Engineering Education 2008-07-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: The purpose of the following review is to perform an analysis of what occurs when a student is learning-by-teaching. First, learning-by-teaching will be concretely defined to identify precisely what is meant by the term. Secondly, an analysis of the activities involved in the teaching process will be used to describe why teaching is a beneficial mechanism to elicit learning in the teacher. Theoretical underpinnings associated with such learning approaches will be discussed to construct a framework to support the mechanism. Third, a description of various learning-by-teaching approaches with research support will be shown to describe how learning-by-teaching has been used and what the benefits and drawbacks are to such approaches. Appropriate contexts for use of learning-by-teaching approaches will be included. The concluding discussion will describe the implications that learning-by-teaching can have in engineering education.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00011
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The science of science education (with a focus of the physics of motion): historical, epistemological, and research contributions. A review of and commentary on literature. 2008-11-01

A qualifying paper for the Department of Education. Abstract: In an attempt to better understand the field of science education research, the field is reduced to three major contributing disciplines: the practice of science itself as informed through the history of science, developmental psychology and epistemological considerations, and finally the practice of education. To build an archetypal case, I look exclusively at dynamics, an early pursuit of physics; the lessons could be applied to other branches of science. In looking at scientific content, it is possible to learn more about the nature of scientific knowledge, and the representational tools that scientists use to generate new knowledge. This leads to the realization that science in itself is an epistemological tool and raises questions about human development. In development, we see the processes that individuals employ to gain new knowledge, scientific or otherwise. Development also provides mechanisms for communities to develop and utilize the same representational tools that are so valuable in creating scientific knowledge. Finally, the lessons of development must be translated into learning environments. This typically means classrooms. Here, researchers and educators have had to maintain a precarious balance between theory and practice, yet there have been several successful results suggesting with a clever approach, excellence in science education is an achievable goal.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00012
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Science as Multiple Representations: Integrated perspectives on the role of learning and appropriating representations in constructing science understanding 2008

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education. Abstract: This work explores how students learn and appropriate representations in the development of understanding. It is driven by four central questions that address: (1) the reasons for why representation is central to the development of thought; (2) a definition of representation in a manner such that it becomes a useful construct for studying science learning; (3) the evolution of conventional systems of representation and how these attempts to "put the world on paper" have impacted domains of knowledge; and (4) the literature on representation in science specifically from the standpoint of children spontaneously externalizing knowledge across multiple systems. The integration of theoretical constructs with empirical evidence supports the argument that students must be given opportunities to express themselves in different ways in order to understand science. Researchers must attend to the relationships between specific systems of representation and conceptual aspects when children engage in scientific discovery. Finally, this work calls for future research into how spontaneous and idiosyncratic representations of knowledge help students refine explanations and construct scientific understanding.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00013
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Number Concept: Theoretical and Empirical Views of Number Processing 2008

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education. Abstract: Studies of children's numerical understanding over the last decade suggest that there are identifiable progressions in how children develop number concepts. This paper provides a review of the leading research on number concept and how it relates to the research on external representation of number and number processing models. It is evident from this review that, while there are many hypotheses surrounding the processing, representation, and interpretation of numbers, much still has to be learned about this subject in young children. While there are several theories about how children come to understand the number system using various metaphors such as computer programs that learn through experience, currently, the data on young children has yet to provide any conclusive evidence regarding the early childhood number concept and how it gradually develops. There is a strong need for research in which aspects of the leading number processing theories may apply to children in their acquisition of a full-fledged number concept.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00014
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Exploring First Grade Students' Planning in an Engineering Design Problem and Its Relationships to Artifact Construction and Success: A Pilot Study 2008-12-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore how first grade students plan and solve an engineering design problem. It specifically analyzes children's drawings of their planned solutions to the problem and how the drawings related to the engineering design problem requirements, the construction of the solutions, and the success of their solutions. First grade students participated in individual videotaped interview sessions where they engaged in drawing and constructing a solution to an engineering design problem. The results of this study suggest that planning prior to constructing an artifact is something that many first grade students can do but more research is needed to understand the characteristics and experiences of young students that differentiate their performance in planning and carrying ideas from planning to artifact construction.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00015
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Elementary Students' Enhanced Understanding of Perimeter and Area Measurement in an Engineering Contextual Learning Program 2008-12-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Education. Abstract: The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of an engineering education afterschool learning program upon elementary students' understanding of perimeter and area measurement. The study also investigated what activities children attribute to the work of engineers, how they define technology, and how these ideas change after they go through an engineering education afterschool program. This study, conducted in rural/suburban Massachusetts in 2005, included forty-two elementary students. Students were voluntarily enrolled in the afterschool program and met during the school year, working collaboratively in a series of ten sessions, eight of which were instructional. Each student engineering group completed curriculum activities from selected modules of an established elementary program for engineering education while also receiving mathematics instruction on the measurement of perimeter and area. Student understanding was assessed using a qualitative and quantitative research design.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00016
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Measuring Engineering Design Self-Efficacy 2009-02-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: The purpose of this study is to take an initial step in the measurement of conative measures, by documenting the development and validation of a new instrument to assess engineering design self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is a motivational construct regarding an individuals belief or judgment of their capability to organize and execute courses of action for a given domain-specific task (Bandura, 1986, 1997). Self-efficacy influences behaviors in accordance with perceived abilities for a specific task. The task of interest for this study will be engineering design. Engineering design is the process used to devise a system, component, or process to meet a need. The concept was chosen because of its importance in the field of engineering (Auyang, 2004).
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00017
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The Effect of Two-Dimensional and Stereoscopic Presentation on Middle School Students' Performance of Spatial Cognition Tasks 2009

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree in Mathematics, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: Nineteen middle-school aged students visiting a planetarium were presented with three types of spatial cognition tasks using both two-dimensional (flat) and stereoscopic representations. The students' performance on tasks was evaluated in order to determine the impact of stereoscopic presentation upon accuracy and task completion time. Results show that accuracy did not differ between the two representational types while completion time was greater for the stereoscopic representations. Post task interviews show that students continued to think of the stereoscopic spatial tasks as two-dimensional. Results were analyzed through the lenses of cognitive load and cue theory.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00018
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Toward a More Complete Theory of Design-Based Science Teaching and Learning: Recognizing the Voices of Students of Color 2009

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Education. Abstract: The aim of this review is to explore the question of whose Discursive practices count within primary science education and science education research. To examine this question, this review situates science Discursive practices within the dichotomous relationship of dominant and non-dominant and uses these categories to theorize, examine, and challenge the ways that race and racism implicitly and explicitly impact school views of scientific thinking and knowledge. The goal of this exploration is to advocate for the implementation of alternative methods of study and analysis when investigating the Discursive practices of children from communities of color, particularly within the context of design-based science activities. With the increased recognition of design-based science as a pedagogical approach to teaching science, I contend that the experiences of all children need to be investigated in order to develop a more complete theory of design-based science teaching and learning. Designing explorations into what these children bring to design-based science activities will assist in the process of ensuring academic success for all students.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00019
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Children's Understanding of Area of Rectangular Regions and Volumes of Rectangular Shapes and the Relationship of These Measures to Their Linear Dimensions 2007-04-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: What is needed to strengthen our students' understanding of the attributes of space, to prepare our students for a world that requires increasingly advanced levels of technical sophistications? Again the questions posed are: which concepts should be taught and when should these concepts be introduced? Are there particular sequences or an order in which these concepts should be taught? And what materials and tools should be used in the teaching and learning of geometry? In seeking to answer the above questions, this paper focuses on a narrower band of geometric measurement, aimed at harvesting the findings of the reviewed research and suggesting fruitful possibilities for further study. The main goal is to review the literature on studies that have been conducted specifically in the treatment of area and volume, as well as length, with elementary students.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00020
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Exploratory study of fourth graders concurrently investigating perimeter, area, surface area, and volume in an interactive classroom 2007-07-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: This paper describes an exploratory study of how a fourth grade class investigated the relationships among perimeter, area, surface area, and volume of rectangular shapes. The five-session intervention involved 11 boys and 8 girls in a suburban public school. The students working independently and in partnerships were given particular tools (e.g., measuring strings, grid mats, rectangular prisms, pre-cut rectangular shapes, one-inch plastic tiles, and Klick-like puzzles) to complete measurement tasks. The students demonstrated their understanding of the 2-D and 3-D attributes in pretests and posttests, discussions, reflections, prediction tasks, constructions of 2-D and 3-D rectangular shapes and arrays, and posters. The quantitative results indicate increased student performance and understanding, particularly for area, surface area, volume, and appropriate units of spatial measure. Qualitative findings suggest that the interaction of planned partnerships, the materials students used, and the tasks, activities, and reflections they completed, produced positive results.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00021
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
The relationships between teacher and student understanding: The conceptual field of combinatorics 2009-06-02

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: The purpose of this review is to build a foundation from which to consider the relationships among the professional development activities of middle and secondary school mathematics teachers, the mathematical understanding and pedagogical content knowledge of the teachers, and the mathematical understanding of their students. The goal is to enable investigation of the following questions: What are the relationships among: (i) a teacher's understanding in combinatorics; (ii) the teacher's pedagogical content knowledge in combinatorics; (iii) their students' understanding in combinatorics? Specifically, what is the relationship between the ways in which a teacher is able to solve and explain introductory problems in combinatorics and the ways in which their students respond to similar problems? Are there connections between a teacher's mathematical understanding and their students' mathematical understanding?
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00022
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Students' and teachers' understandings of mathematical functions 2011-02-01

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: The goal of the study presented in this paper is to describe students' and teachers' understandings of: (1) the definition of function and (2) the transformations of functions in different representations. This will be achieved through a case study analysis of two ninth grade students, two twelfth grade students, and two mathematics teachers. The six participants were recruited from the same high school in Boston, Massachusetts, which serves a diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural community. The participants were interviewed individually about questions pertaining to the definition of function and the transformations of functions. Analysis of the results revealed that the ninth grade students have a less sophisticated understanding of the concept of function than do twelfth grade students. It was expected that both teachers would have a similar understanding of functions, but it was found that the twelfth grade teacher had a more theoretical and rigid understanding of the concept of function than did the ninth grade teacher, who had a more practical and flexible understanding of the concept of function. In this case, flexible means translating to other representations of functions and/or using different approaches to functions, while rigid means the opposite.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00023
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Analyzing solution methods for combinatorics problems: differences across problems and across teachers 2010

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: This paper describes a small study in which five teachers were interviewed in order to gain insight into their understanding of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a challenging mathematical area that provides learners with a basis for a great deal of applied mathematics, including statistics. Through interviews with teachers, this study sought to investigate how the teachers solved combinatorics problems, the methods they used, the issues they raised, and the knowledge they displayed.In particular, the analysis presented here addresses three questions:i. how do the methods used when solving combinatorics problems relate to the mathematical attributes of the question;ii. how do the methods used when solving combinatorics problems in an interview differ across teachers;iii. how does a mathematical problem with unexpected difficulties or subtleties illuminate the differences among teachers.In order to address these questions, this paper will first look at the reasons for focusing on this area of mathematics and will define the specific area that I am addressing. Next, we will look at existing work on teaching and learning combinatorics, including considering some common errors and misconceptions.Following this, the methodology for this study will be described. The methodology section will describe the line-by-line analysis of the transcripts of the teacher interviews, during which each participant was asked to solve and discuss a series of combinatorics problems. The results from this analysis regarding the relationships among teachers, methods, and mathematical tasks are outlined in detail.The subsequent discussion provides both a qualitative look at these first two research questions and a foundation and justification for addressing the third research question, (iii) how does a mathematical problem with unexpected difficulties or subtleties illuminate the differences among teachers. The discussion shows that the differences among teachers extend beyond which methods they choose and whether or not the answers to the questions are simply correct or incorrect, but also include subtleties in how they employ the methods and how they view the utility of each one.
Location: DCA Digital Storage
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00024
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
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Children's materials science practices before, during, and after a design-based science learning experience 2009

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Math, Science, Technology, and Engineering Education. Abstract: Materials science, which entails the practices of selecting, testing, and characterizing materials, is an important discipline within the study of matter. This paper examines how third grade students' materials science performance changes over the course of instruction based on an engineering design challenge. I conducted a case study of nine students who participated in engineering design-based science instruction with the goal of constructing a stable, quiet, thermally comfortable model house. The learning outcome of materials science practices was assessed by clinical interviews conducted before and after the instruction, and the learning process was assessed by students' workbooks completed during the instruction. The interviews included two materials selection tasks for designing a sturdy stepstool and an insulated pet habitat. Results indicate that (1) students significantly improved on both materials selection tasks, (2) their gains were significantly positively associated with the degree of completion of their workbooks, and (3) students who were highly engaged with the workbook's reflective record-keeping tasks showed the greatest improvement on the interviews. These findings suggest the important role workbooks can play in facilitating elementary students' learning of science through authentic activity such as engineering design.
Location: DCA Digital Storage
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00025
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
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Item ID: UA071.001.001.00026
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
 
Affect and the scientific pursuit: Learning to feel like a scientist 2013-07-23

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy In Science Education.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00028
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
 
Attending to Affect in Student Inquiry 2014

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education.
Location: DCA Digital Storage
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00029
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
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Attention to Student Framing in Responsive Teaching 2014

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education
Location: DCA Digital Storage
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00030
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.
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High School Students' Understandings and Representations of the Electric Field 2014

A qualifying paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education.
Item ID: UA071.001.001.00031
Type: Item
Access: Open for research.