Jeanne Penvenne Papers, circa 1995 -- 2018

Overview

Title: Jeanne Penvenne Papers
Dates: circa 1995 -- 2018
Creator: Penvenne, Jeanne
Call Number: MS238
Size: 1.6 Cubic Feet
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10427/013759
Location:
    Digital Collections and Archives, Tufts University
    archives@tufts.edu
    http://sites.tufts.edu/dca/

Description

This collection contains material by or about Gerald R. Gill kept by Jeanne Penvenne, his colleague in the History Department, including correspondence, articles and publications, press clippings, photographs, Gill's obituary and various remembrances, and other memorabilia. This collection also contains office files, including correspondence, meeting notes, fliers, and other materials documenting the Black Cultural Studies Seminar, the Africana Film Festival, the Kenya Program, the Africa and the New World Program, the Gill Fellows Program, and the Senior Honors Thesis Exchange; video cassettes of the 2003 World Food Day Conference and the 2004 LUCE Seminar at Tufts; as well as a sample of student work on which Penvenne either served as advisor or reader, including senior theses and Gerald Gill Prize-nominated papers.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged in two series: Jeanne Penvenne Papers on Gerald R. Gill; and 2018 accessions.

Biography/History

Biographical / Historical

Gerald R. Gill (1948-2007) taught American history at Tufts University from 1980-2007. He began as an assistant professor, served as an associate professor beginning in 1987, and became the history department's deputy chair in 1998. He was a leading scholar in the field of African-American history and the history of the civil rights movement. He was also a founding and core member of several interdisciplinary programs at Tufts, including American Studies, Africa in the New World Studies, and Peace and Justice Studies. Gill was born on November 18, 1948 in New Rochelle, New York, to Robert and Etta Gill. He received a bachelor's degree in history in 1970 from Lafayette College, where he was one of the founders of Lafayette's Association of Black Collegians and the Black Cultural Center. He then earned a master's degree in United States history (1974) and a doctorate in history (1985) from Howard University in Washington D.C. A conscientious objector during the Vietnam War, Gill wrote his dissertation on the history of twentieth-century African-American pacifism. Gill taught at Howard University (1975-1978), University of the District of Columbia (1978), Harvard University (1979), and UCLA (1986), in addition to Tufts University (1980-2007). He received a number of teaching awards and honors, including Professor of the Year for Massachusetts (twice, in 1995 and 1999); the Lerman-Neubauer Prize for Outstanding Teaching and Advising (1998); the Tufts Community Union Senate's Professor of the Year Award (1999); and the Lillian and Joseph Leibner Award for Distinguished Teaching and Advising (1993). The Distinguished Service Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Tufts Community, bestowed on Gill in 2000 by the university's Africana Center, was renamed the Gerald R. Gill Distinguished Service Award in his honor the same year. He was also awarded research fellowships at the W.E.B. Dubois Institute at Harvard (1979), the Center for Afro-American Studies at U.C.L.A. (1985), and a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship at the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture (1997). Gill's university service included membership on many committees, particularly those related to undergraduate education and advising. In addition to teaching, mentoring students, and writing, Gill served as a consultant on many public television and documentary projects, including Eyes on the Prize, The American Experience, Africans in America, This Far by Faith, and I'll Make Me a World. He was the author of Meanness Mania: The Changed Mood (1980), co-authored The Case for Affirmative Action for Blacks in Higher Education (1978), edited the Faculty Guide and Student Study Guide for the Eyes on the Prize (1991), and co-edited The Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader (1991). At the time of his death, he was working on two unpublished books: Struggling Yet in Freedom's Birthplace: The Civil Rights Movement in Boston, 1935-1972, a history of Boston race relations; and Dissent, Discontent and Disinterest: Afro-American Opposition to the United States War of the Twentieth Century, an extension of his doctoral dissertation. Gill was divorced with one daughter, Ayanna Gill. He died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on July 26, 2007.

Biographical / Historical

Jeanne Marie Penvenne was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 1947. From 1993 through 2018, she was a professor in the Tufts University Department of History, specializing in the history of labor conditions in Mozambique. She is married to Norman Robert Bennett, and together they have two children and four grandchildren.

Penvenne earned an Associate's Degree from Berkshire Community College in 1967, a B.A. in History and Philosophy from Northeastern University in 1972, and Ph.D. in History from Boston University in 1982. Between her B.A. and Ph.D. degrees, Penvenne joined the Peace Corps and was stationed in Brazil, where she learned Portuguese. With her knowledge of the language, Penvenne focused her dissertation research on the labor history of Mozambique. She has published widely on this topic, including her first book, African Workers and Colonial Racism; Mozambican Strategies for Survival in Lourenço Marques, Mozambique 1877-1962 (1995), as well as Women, Migration and the Cashew Economy of Southern Mozambique, 1945 to 1975 (2015), a study of the cashew women's economic, social, and urban histories.

After teaching at Boston University, Penvenne was appointed Assistant Professor in the Tufts University History Department in 1993, was tenured and promoted to Associate Professor in 1997, and became Full Professor in 2016. Penvenne was also involved in other departments at Tufts, including International Relations and Political Science, in which she served as thesis reader for numerous students and helped establish the Thesis Exchange, a space for thesis writers in various departments to share ideas and problems. Penvenne was recognized for her teaching and service at Tufts with the Lerman Neubauer Prize for Outstanding Teaching and Advising (1999), the Lillian and Joseph Leibner Award for Excellence in Teaching and Advising (2001), and the Seymour Simches Award for Distinguished Teaching and Advising (2018), among others. She has also received awards for her scholarly work from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, and the U.S. Public Affairs Office.

After the unexpected death in 2007 of Gerald Gill, her friend and colleague in the History Department, Penvenne worked closely with the Gill family to bring his papers to the Tufts Digital Collections and Archives. The collection was donated in 2017. In 2018, Penvenne retired and became Professor of History, Emerita.

Access and Use

Access Restrictions

This collection contains some restricted material. Restrictions related to specific material are listed in the detailed contents list. Please contact DCA for further details.

Use Restrictions

Some material in this collection may be protected by copyright and other rights. Please see "Reproduction and Use" on the Digital Collections and Archives website for more information about reproductions and permission to publish. Any intellectual property rights that the donor possesses have been transferred to Tufts University.

Preferred Citation

Jeanne Penvenne Papers, 1995-2018. Tufts University. Digital Collections and Archives. Medford, MA.

Collection History

Processing Notes

Processing completed by Leah Edelman and Scott Hoag in 2017-2018. Materials were placed in archival boxes, and loose materials were placed in folders where needed. Received order was maintained. A folder and box-level inventory and series-level descriptions were created, and the finding aid was also created at the time of processing.  

Acquisition

Gift of Jeanne Penvenne, 2017-2018.

Subjects and Genre Terms
  • Tufts University -- Faculty -- Archives.
  • Faculty papers
  • Tufts University. Department of History.
  • Gill, Gerald R.
Related Material
  • Gerald R. Gill Papers, 1921-2007. Tufts University. Digital Collections and Archives. Medford, MA.

Series Description

  1. Jeanne Penvenne Papers on Gerald R. Gill, circa 1995 -- 2007

    This series contains material by or about Gerald Gill kept by Jeanne Penvenne, his colleague in the History Department, including correspondence, articles and publications, press clippings, photographs, and other memorabilia. This series also includes Gill's obituary and various remembrances.

  2. 2018 accessions, circa 1997 -- 2018

    This series contains office files, including correspondence, meeting notes, fliers, and other materials documenting the Black Cultural Studies Seminar, the Africana Film Festival, the Kenya Program, the Africa and the New World Program, the Gill Fellows Program, and the Senior Honors Thesis Exchange. This series also contains video cassettes of the 2003 World Food Day Conference and the 2004 LUCE Seminar at Tufts, Penvenne's correspondence with Gerald Gill's daughter Ayanna Gill, as well as a sample of student work on which Penvenne either served as advisor or reader, including senior theses and Gerald Gill Prize-nominated papers.