Wild European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) Adjust to Captivity with Sustained Sympathetic Nervous System Drive and a Reduced Fight-or-Flight Response.

Romero, L. Michael.
Dickens, Molly J.
2009

Although research on wild species typically involves capture, handling, and some degree of captivity, few studies examine how these actions affect and/or alter the animal's underlying stress physiology. Furthermore, we poorly understand the immediate changes that occur as wild animals adjust to captive conditions. Most studies to date have investigated relatively long-term changes in the glucocort... read more

Subjects
Stress (Physiology)
Sturnus vulgaris.
Animal behavior.
Heart beat.
Tufts University. Department of Biology.
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/009681
Original publication
Molly J. Dickens and L. Michael Romero, "Wild European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) Adjust to Captivity with Sustained Sympathetic Nervous System Drive and a Reduced Fight‐or‐Flight Response," Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 82, no. 5 (September/October 2009):-. DOI: 10.1086/603633.
ID: tufts:17151
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