The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 2

Allen, Thomas
1828

Waxchandlers. 20.

Waxchandlers. 20.

Arms. Az. on a chevron ar. between three mortcours (i. e. lamps) or, as many roses gu. seeded of the third, barbed vert. Crest. A maiden proper, kneeling among various flowers of the last, vested or, turned up ermine; in her hand a chaplet, or garland of flowers, of the first. Supporters. Two unicorns gu. guttee d'eau; armed crined, and unguled, or; gorged with a chaplet of roses gu. leaved vert, these to a flat chain or, at the end of the chain three rings of the last. Motto. Truth is the light.

This company is of ancient foundation, and was incorporated by letters patent of king Richard III. in the year 1483, by the name and style of The master, wardens, and commonalty, of the art or mystery of waxchandlers of London. It is a livery company, and the twentieth on the city list.

They are governed by a master, wardens, and court of assistants.

The hall of this company, which is a modern building of brick, is situated in Maiden-lane, Wood-street.

The Names of the Company of Wexechandelers, from the Record in the Chapter-House. Thomas LaneJohn Kechyn Edward BillyngRichard Cocks John ScampionWillm. Scampion Willm. HullWillm. Wakeffeld John ShepardSymond Burton John DevellThomas Jakett Willm. RussellEdmond Scampion Willm. HarmondAllane Creswell Willm. BaynardJohn Swetyng Willm. PeerisWillm. Sowthwell Thomas CresseyRobt. Marsy Thomas LawlesRobert Gray Thomas GrenellRobt. Nashe Walter SawlkinEdward Lowman Agnes Sawlkin wedoweEdward Gyllam Richard FfordJohn Robards Willm. KendellHenry Blowar Robert BowlmerWillm. Pesgood John ErleThomas Vaux George BlaychardRobert Throwar Willm. HilyardJohn Vausse John LyndRichard Hastyngs

. on a chevron between mortcours (i. e. lamps) , as many roses seeded of the , barbed . A maiden , kneeling among various flowers of the last, vested , turned up ermine; in her hand a chaplet, or garland of flowers, of the . . unicorns gu. guttee d'eau; armed crined, and unguled, ; gorged with a chaplet of roses gu. leaved vert, these to a flat chain or, at the end of the chain rings of the last. .

Truth is the light.

This company is of ancient foundation, and was incorporated by letters patent of king Richard III. in the year , by the name and style of

The master, wardens, and commonalty, of the art or mystery of waxchandlers of London.

It is a livery company, and the on the city list.

They are governed by a master, wardens, and court of assistants.

The hall of this company, which is a modern building of brick, is situated in , .

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: History of London, from the Accession of William and Mary, to the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER II: History of London during the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER III: History of London from the Accession of George the Third, to the year 1780
 CHAPTER IV: History of London continued to the Union
 CHAPTER V: History of London from the Union to the Jubilee, 1809
 CHAPTER VI: History of London from the Jubilee to the Peace of 1814
 CHAPTER VII: History of London continued to the accession of George the Fourth
 CHAPTER VIII: Account of the Civil Government of the City by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors, with a list of the latter...
 CHAPTER IX: An account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, with a list of the latter
collapseCHAPTER X: Lists and brief Accounts of the various Officers and Courts within the City
collapseCHAPTER XI: Some account of the Ecclesiastical Government of the city of London, with a List and Biographical Notices of the Bishops of the see
collapseCHAPTER XII: Some Account of the Military Government of London, and the Artillery Company
collapseCHAPTER XIII: An Account of the twelve principal Companies of the City of London
collapseCHAPTER XIV: An Account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged
 CHAPTER XV: An Account of the River Thames
collapseCHAPTER XVI: Historical and topographical account of London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Blackfriars Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and the Thames Tunnel
collapseCHAPTER XVII: Topographical and Historical Account of the Tower of London
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44305
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00067
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights