The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 2

Allen, Thomas
1828

An account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged.

An account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged.

Apothecaries. 58.

ArmsConfirmed 1617. az. Apollo with his head radiant, holding in his left hand a bow, in his right an arrow, all or; supplanting a serpent ar. Crest. A rhinoceros statantproper. Supporters. Two unicorns or, armed, crined, and hoofed ar. Motto. Opiferque per orbem dicor. This company was incorporated at first with the grocers in the year 1606; but such a connection not answering the purposes of their incorporation, they were separated by another charter granted by king James I. in the year 1617, and incorporated by the name of the master, wardens, and society of the art and mystery of apothecaries of the city of London: at which time there were no more than one hundred and four apothecaries' shops within the city and suburbs of London.

Their hall is in Water-lane, Blackfriars. The freehold of a physic garden at Chelsea was given to the apothecaries by sir Hans Sloane, upon condition that they should present annually to the royal society, fifty new plants, till the number should amount to 2000. This condition was punctually fulfilled, and the specimens are yet preserved in the society's collection.

The members of this company, who by divers acts of parliament are exempt from ward and parish offices, are governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants. It is a livery company.

Armourers and Braziers, 22.

Arms. Ar. on a chevron sa. a gauntlet of the first, between two pair of swords in saltier of the last, hilts and pomels or; on a chief of the second, an oval shield of the field, charged with a cross gu. encircled with a carved shield of the third, between two peers' helmets proper, garnished or. impaling az. on a chevron or, between two ewers (i. e. beakers) in chief, and a three legged pot with two handles, in base, of the second, three roses gu. seeded or, barbed vert. Crest. A demi-man in armour, couped at the middle of the thighs, all proper, garnished or; the beaver up; on his head, a plume of three feathers, two ar. and one gu. round his waist, a sash of the last, fringed of the second; holding in his dexter hand a sword erect of the first, hilt and pomel or. Supporters. Two men proper, in complete armour; the dexter of the first, garnished or; the sinister, all of the last; on their heads, plumes of feathers; round their waists, a sash, and each holding in his exterior hand a sword, as in the Crest. Motto. We are one. The company of armourers was an ancient brotherhood previous to being incorporated by king Henry VI. which was about the year 1423, by the title of The master and wardens, brothers, and sisters of the fraternity or guild of St. George, of the men of the mysteries of the armourers of the city of London. The same prince also honoured the company by becoming one of their members.

The armourers were formerly employed in making coats of mail, helmets, and the rest of the defensive furniture of ancient warfare; but, after the use of fire-arms became generally prevalent, their business fell into complete disuse. So little, indeed, is the manufacture of plate armour now understood, that the making of two suits, the one of brass, the other of steel, for a place of public amusement, was regarded as a matter of much interest and ability. In the reign of Henry VIII. the armourers of London derived so much useful instruction from some German artificers, who had been sent to England at the request of the king himself, that they soon undersold the foreigners. In queen Elizabeth's time, there were thirty-five armourers resident in the metropolis, who kept servants and shops; yet so rapidly did their trade decay, that in the reign of James I. that number was reduced to five only, with one servant each. The company is now chiefly composed of braziers, founders, and coppersmiths.

The hall of this company is a plain brick edifice, standing at the north end of Coleman-street.

To this company is united that of the braziers, who are jointly governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants. It is a livery company.

The Names of the Company of Armorers from the Record in the Chapter House. Will. ChamberThomas Mylner Thomas WellerWillm. Parr John LymseyJames Jenyng John RichemondWillm. Barker John AleynThomas Ffen John DownyngRichard Laycrofte Willm. CookeThomas Goun Nicholas BarkerHugh Saunder Symond CowperJohn Wolf Willm. NewmanJohn Edwyn Richard HountWillm. Kyngston John HiltonThomas Baker Willm. SmytheMiles Jerham George BrodsWillm. Brown Robtt. StanfeldJohn Porter Willm. LucreantRobert Inner Robert BuckerdAlex. Maperley John FrowlopeRogier Tyndall Edmond JerhamRichard Cocke Robert SlayterRichard Ward Robert PaycockRobert James Willm. GounRichard Empson Edmond PkynsPeter Crowche Edward SissonWillm. Horsnayle

Bakers. 19.

Arms. Gu, a balance between three garbs or, on a chief barry wavy of four ar. and az. an arm embowed proper, vested gu, cuffed or, issuing from clouds affixed to the upper part of the centre of the chief, of the fifth, radiated of the last, between two anchors of the second, the hand supporting the balance. Crest. On a wreath two arms embowed-proper, issuing out of clouds of the last vested gu, cuffed or, holding in their hands a chaplet of wheat of the last. Supporters, two stags proper, attired or, each gorged with a chaplet of wheat of the last. Motto. Praise God for all. The company of bakers appears to be of great antiquity; for in the year 1155, it was charged in the great roll of the exchequer with a debt of one mark of gold for their guild; by which it seems as if the ancient guilds had held their privileges in fee-farm of the crown. The bakers were, originally, distinguished into two classes, viz., the white bakers and the brown bakers, the first were incorporated by Edward II., about 1307, the brown bakers by James I., 1621. The charter granted to the former was renewed by Henry VII., and confirmed by Henry VIII., Edw. VI., Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth, and James I. It is incorporated by the name of The master and wardens of the mystery, or art of bakers of the city of London. Their hallis in Harplane.

The Names of the Company of Bakers, from the Record in the Chapter-house. John ColynsJohn Holbeck John RobynsonWillm. Alleyn Richard StaggThomas Lewys Richard MorecockLewis Davy David JohnesMatheiwe Water Thomas CleytonThomas Killingworth William SquyrteMorrys ap David John MorysJohn Brasier Clement TowneJohn Challenger Robert MyrehamJohn Marten Richard BrownThomas Jacson, Jun. John OttringhamJohn Bykerton Maurice DanyddRichard Morys Robert ClerkeWillm. Benett John TaylerCristofer Rayncock John JacksonRichard Silvester Richard BarleyJohn Lounnesdale Owen WilliamsAndrew Scartoke Agnes Best, widoweJohn Jonson William IngramRichard Grey John BewykeJohn Berness Sampson CleytonRichard Parow Robert FfytcheJohn Richards Richard GreyRichard Burneham Thomas SpencerJames Blakwell Lewis HeyfordeGiles Gose Willm. TaylorRichard Hodge Richard HartGriffith Johns John HetheRogier Hale Willm. BrayfeldJohn Rondell John LloydThomas Walker Reynold JohnsonDavid Vaughan Thomas Jacson, Sen.

Barbers. 17

Arms. Quarterly first and fourth, sa, a chevron between three fleams ar, second and third, per pale ar, and vert, a spatula in pale ar, surmounted of a rose gu, charged with another of the first; the first rose regally crowned proper. Between the four quarters a cross of St. George gu, charged with a lion passant guardant or. Crest. An opinicus, with wings indorsed, or. Supporters two lynxes proper, spotted of various colours, both ducally collared and chained, or. Motto. De prescientia Dei.

The art of surgery was anciently practised in this city only by the barbers, who were incorporated by letters patent, granted by King Edward IV. in the year 1461; and, in 1512, an act was passed to prevent any persons besides the barbers from practising surgery within the city of London, and seven miles round, except such as were duly examined and admitted by the bishop of London, or the dean of St. Paul's, and such persons expert in surgery, as they shall think proper to call to their assistance. At length several persons, who were not barbers, being examined and admitted as practitioners in the art of surgery, the parliament united them in the thirty-second year of the reign of king Henry VIII. by the appellation of The master or governors of the mystery or commonalty of barbers and surgeons of the city of London; and by this act, all persons practising the art of shaving, were strictly enjoined not to intermeddle with that of surgery, except what belonged to drawing of teeth. Thus this company obtained the name of barber-surgeons, which they continued to enjoy till the eighteenth year of the reign of George the Second, when the surgeons applying to parliament to have this union dissolved, were formed into a separate company; though the barbers were left in possession of the hall and theatre, and were constituted a body politic, under the name of The master, governors, and commonalty of the mystery of barbers of London. Barbers hall is situated in Monkwell-street, Cripplegate.

This is a livery company, under the government of a master, three wardens, and twenty-six assistants.

The Names of the Company of Barber Surgeons, from the Record in the Chapter-house. Nicholas SymsonHarry Carrier Willm. KirckbyRauf Garland Thomas VycarsJohn Enderbye John BanksPeter Devismand John PotterRobert Postell Thomas TwynJohn Bird John JohnsonJames Tomson John HollandWillm. Kydd Willm. ReweJohn Yong John AylyffThomas Sutton Edmond HarmanCharles Wight John PenJohn Newman Richard TaylerThomas Grome Willm. HiggsHugh Dier John DeneEdward Ffreeman Thomas SurbuttThomas Mone Willm. BillingWillm. Yenson Willm. LyghthedJohn Banester John RavenWillm. Trewise Robert HuttonChristofer Hungate Henry PembertonJohn Hutton Willm. ShirborneJohn Browne George GenneJohn Grene Thomas JohnsonJohn Tymber Robert SpegnallJohn Shrene Richard BollThomas Staynton Nacholas AlcockeThomas Pays Wilton TylleyThomas Mede John NorthcoteJohn Anger Willm. WetyngtonThomas Worstley Henry YongJohn Gilberd Cristofer SamondCristofer Haynes Robert WaterfordWillm. Smythe Henry AtkynJohn Mosseley Christofer BollingWillm. Hill Robert StordaleGeorge Wenyard Mathiewe JohnsonJohn Barker Davy SambrokeWillm Barker John AtkynsonJames Wod Thomas WarynJohn Stere Robert GroveWillm. Hetherley Robert BrownhillOlyver Wilson Willm. SpencerWillm. Grene Thomas ButfilaneHenry Rawshold Robert FforsterBartilmewe Dobynson Edmond TyrellHenry Patterson John PhillpottPhilip Pegott John ThoalmodRobert Downys Edward IngalbyAntony Barowes Richard ElyottJames Hogeson Thomas WilsonRobert Wever John SmytheJohn Surbut Willm. HillerWillm. Sewell Richard TholmodJohn Denys John AwcetterJohn Page Richard SermondRobert Dodwell Hugh LyncockeJohn Cutbert John BordmanJohn Gray Rauf StekWillm. Dauntese Henry HogekynsonThomas Appilton John TomsonJohn Cragell Thomas ArundellWillm. Welfed Willm. JohnsonJon. Smerthwarte Henr. AdamJohn Smerthwarte Willm. DownhamJohn Lybbe Rogier SkynnerGeorge More John GerardThomas Burnett Richard RogiersJohn Hanlyn Thomas DicsonRichard Child Thomas GilmanThomas Baily Thomas DeftonGeorge Vaughan Edward HewettThomas Wetynghm John DormotJohn Bonair George BatmanRichard Cokerel Thomas VivianWillm. Walton George BrightweltonGeferey Ffranceis John WarenThomas Ffayles John GrenwayJohn Edlyn John BellJohn Samond Daurence MollynersHenry Bodeley John GodboldThomas Stanbrige Willm. DraperWillm. Borrel Richard SmytheRichard Nicols Robert LodoEdward Hughbank John GambynJohn Charterane Thomas CutbertHenry Wotton Robert ChamberRobert Hastyngs Lewis BromefeldAlex. Mason Richard WorseleyThomas Darker John OskynThomas Ffyshe John RobynsonEdward Rollesley Richard ColeyJohn Brasswell John WestWillm. Symsyn

Basket-Makers. 52.

Arms. Az. Three cross baskets in pale, ar, between a prime and an iron on the dexter, and a cutting knife and an outsticker on the sinister, of the second. Crest a cradle, therein a child, rocked at the head by a girl, and at the feet by a boy, both vested, all proper. Motto. Let us love one another. The basket-makers are a fraternity by prescription, and not by charter; but when, or by whom erected into a fellowship, is unknown. They are, however, included in the list of the city companies, by the title of, The wardens, assistants, and freemen of the company of basket-makers of the city of London. It is a livery company, and is governed by two wardens and forty-eight assistants.

Blacksmiths. 40.

Arms.Confirmed June 24, 1610. Sa. a chevron or, between three hammers ar, handled of the second, ducally crowned of the last. Crest. A mount vert, thereon a phoenix with wings indorsed proper, firing herself with the sun-beams of the last. Motto. By hammer and hand all arts do stand. The company of blacksmiths was anciently a guild, or fraternity, by prescription, in which state it continued till the reign of queen Elizabeth, in the year 1571, when they obtained a charter of incorporation, by the name of The keepers or wardens and society of the art and mystery de les blacksmiths, of London; which was confirmed by king James I., in the second year of his reign.

This company has a livery, and is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-one assistants. Since the company has abandoned the hall on Lambeth-hill, the business of it is transacted at Cutler's-hall.

The Names of the Company of Blacke Smythes from the Record in the Chapter House. Henry RomynsMorys Casyn Richard BordesRichard Proffall Thomas WeymanJames Sandell Rogier HeycokesWillm. Rogiers Symond GoldsmytheHenry Legate John A. MantonCuthbert Store John BrownWillm. Gaulford Willm. SmytheJohn Dawe John SmytheJohn Aleyn Oswald DokwrayWillm. Hampton Edward PrestonWillm. Hart Thomas ButtlerRobert Baker Willm. Ward

Bowyers. 38.

Arms. Sa. on a chevron between three floats or, as many mullets of the first. Crest. Three long-bows interlaced, one erect, and two in saltier gu. The bowyers were a fraternity by prescription, till the twentyfirst of James I., when they were incorporated by the name of The master, wardens, and society of the mystery of bowyers of the city of London.

It is somewhat singular, that this company should not have been incorporated until the above period; and that it should have been incorporated then, when the use of the bowl as a military engine, was superseded by the introduction of fire-arms.

This is a livery company, and is under the government of a master, two wardens, and twelve assistants.

Brewers. 14.

Arms. Gu. on a chevron ar. between three pair of barley garbs in saltier or, three tuns sa. hooped of the third. Crest. A demi-moorish woman, couped at the knees, proper; her hair dishevelled or, habited sa. frettee ar. her arms extended, holding in each hand three ears of barley of the second. Motto. In God is all our trust.

The brewers' company, which is the fourteenth among the city companies, was incorporated by king Henry VI., in the year 1438, by the name of The master, and keepers or wardens, and commonalty of the mystery or art of brewers of the city of London. This charter was re-confirmed by queen Elizabeth, July 13, second year of her reign.

This corporation anciently bore the arms of St. Thomas Becket, impaled with their own; but that saint's bones being taken up and burnt, and unsainted, by the powers in being, Clarencieux, king at arms, in the year 1544, separated them, and gave the brewers a crest in lieu thereof. Mr. Brayley says, It seems probable, from various circumstances, that the use of beer was not generally introduced till about the reign of Henry VII., in whose time the breweries, which then stood on the banks of the Thames, at St. Catherine's (Wapping), and are distinguished by the name Bere-house, in the map given in the Civitates Orbis, were twice spoiled by the king's officers, either for sending too much abroad unlicensed, or for brewing it too weak for home consumption. In Rymer's Foedera, under the date 1492, is a license granted to John le Merchant a Fleming, to export fifty tuns, or butts of beer, (quinquaginta dolia servitae vocatae Bere) and we find that one of the king's attendants into France, in the same year, was Petrus Vanek, a beer-brewer, of Greenwich, in Kent. Rym. Foed. vol. xii. p. 471, and 485. In 1504, the ale of London was sold at 11. 10s. per dolium, and the beer, per dolium, at 11. 3s. 4d. Dolium, says Fleetwood, (Chron. Pres.) "does here, I believe, signifie a pipe, or butt, which contains 126 gallons; so that the ale comes to near 3d. the gallon;--and the beer to rather more than 2 1/4d. for the same quantity. In the work generally called Arnold's Chronicle, printed by Pynson, about 1521, is the following Receipt for making beer, x quarters malte, ii quarters wheete, ii quarters ootes, x pound weight of hoppys, to make xi barrels of sengyll beer. Twelve years afterwards the price of ale had advanced to about three-pence the gallon, and that of beer was about one half-penny cheaper.Brayley's Hist. of Lond. ii. p. 40l.

In the 23rd year of Henry VIII. the brewers were restrained by a statute from making any more sorts, or kinds of beer, than two, the strong and the double, and it was ordered that the same should be sold after the rate and price of 6s. 8d. the barrel, of the best, and 3s. 4d. the barrel of double beer, and ale, or not above. Notwithstanding this, the prices of both liquors were gradually and considerably increased, till at length, in 1590, the lord mayor, sir John Allot, issued a proclamation requiring the brewers to return to the rates prescribed by the statutes.

There was an estimate made about this time as to what quantity of beer was exported yearly to the Low Countries and other places; from which it appeared that there were twenty great brewhouses, or more, situated on the Thames side, from Milford stairs to below St. Katherines, which brewed yearly the quantity of seven or eight brewings of sweet beer or strong beer, that passed to Embden, the Low Countries, Calais, Dieppe, and thereabouts. And account but 600 brewings at 44 barrels the brewing, it makes 26,400 barrels, which at 7 to a tun, makes 3,771 tuns.Strype's Stow, ii. p. 204.

The demand for beer from foreign countries increased greatly during the whole of the reign of Elizabeth, and the liberty of exporting it was only checked, by proclamation, during the occasional occurrence of dearth and scarcity. One record states, that 500 tuns were exported at once for the queen's use; or, as it has been explained, for the service of her army in the Low Countries; considerable quantities, also, were sent to Embden and Amsterdam.

During the succeeding reigns, to the present time, the prices of ale and beer have been highly augmented through the operation of the successive imposts that have been laid on malt and hops, the duties on which now form an important branch of the public revenue. So great, indeed, has the consumption become, that in the year ending on January 5th, 1812, the duties on malt alone, produced the vast sum of 3,315,389l. The most rapid increase in price took place in the course of the last reign, at the commencement of which, in 1760, ale was sold at 5d. the quart, and strong beer, or porter (which had first come into general use in the time of George I.) at 3d. the quart. Since then the prices have been progressively advanced, and ale is now retailed at eightpence the quart; and porter at five pence the quart; the former price at a first view appears to be equal to the sum for which eight gallons of ale could have been obtained in the reign of Henry III. yet, when the increase in the value of money is properly estimated, it will be found that the augmentation has not been greater than in the proportion of one and a half to one.The quantity of porter brewed in London, by the ten principal houses from the 5th of July 1826, to the 5th of July 1827, was as follows: Barrels. Barclay, Perkins. and Co.341,330 Truman, Hanbury, and Co.203,532 Whitbread, and Co.191,328 Reid, and Co.174,476 Combe, Delfield, and Co.125.534 Calvert, Felix, and Co.100,339 Meux Henry, and Co.95,159 Taylor and Co.64,688 Hoare and Co.64,003 Elliott and Co.52,204 Total1,412,603

The hall of this company, which is a neat edifice of brick and stone, stands on the north side of Addle-street.

The Names of the Company of Bruers from the Record in the Chapter-house. John BrycksaaJohn Kennyhm James WylkinsonJohn Nevill Water BarleyWillm. Shawe George FfothergillJohn Awthorne John RanwikeThomas Stafford Willm. PirryRobert Langley Edward ClerkWillm. Chard Robert BilbyNicholas Shepard Christofer PayneNicholas Custard John MargetsonRobert Wodde Thomas PerryvallMyghell Quadles Thomas TyrryJohn Bawden Alan FfynleysonJohn Medrynghm Robert NycollesGeorge Slayter John BowghmWillm. Hynderwill Robert NycolsonHenry Roberts Christofer WhitelockeJohn Ellys John MoolAlexander Hudson Henry PottThomas Stepheson Willm. JenynsRobert Long Robert MolsonJohn Ferrar James HarwardJohn Mylner Rowland AtkynsonChristofer Ward Willm. HollandWillm. Moryce Thomas HogesonRogier Betts Richard PykeryngJames Baycon Cristofer RobynsonAdam Ranwyke John SeefowleJohn Bell Hugh EfoxJohn Vnderhill John DaldronJames Paynter John RowslyeRosier Turner Antony AntonyJohn Robynson Nicholas BrierleyThomas Rodes Richard PelterThomas Coke Thomas ButtRichard Adams John CocksWillm. Fforster Rogier ThaycherWillm. Thomas Willm. ArcherWillm. Comaunder John AleynWillm. Brough John ElcockHugh Mynors John BargaineEvan Lloyd Willm. KelseyWillm. Mody John BartonLaurence Brunt Stephen CockRobert Moldyng Rowland Shakelady It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-eight assistants.

Butchers. 24.

Arms. Az. two slaughter axes indorsed in saltier or. handled or, between three bulls heads, couped of the second, armed of the third, viz. two in fesse, and one in base; on a chief ar. a boar's head couped gu. between two block-brushes (i. e. bunches of knee holly) vert. Crest. A flying bull ar. wings indorsed or, armed and hoofed of the last; over the head a small circle of glory-proper. Supporters. Two flying bulls ar. winged, armed, and hoofed, or; over each head a small circle of glory proper. Motto, Omnia subjecisti sub pedibus, ores et boves, The company of butchers appears to be of great antiquity; for in the 26th of Henry II. it was fined for setting up a guild without the king's licence. Its present charter was not granted till the 3rd of James I. who, on the 16th of September, 1605, did, by letters patent, incorporate them by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty, of the art or mystery of butchers of the city of London. The hall of this company is situated in Pudding-lane. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, five wardens, and twenty-one assistants.

Card-Makers. 83.

Arms. Gu. on a cross ar. between the four ace cards proper (viz. the ace of hearts and diamonds in chief, the ace of clubs and spades in base), a lion passant guardant of the first. Crest. An armed arm erect, holding in the hand an ace of hearts, all proper. Supporters. Two men in armour complete, proper, garnished or; on each a sash gu. The card-makers' company was incorporated by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1629, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty, of the mystery of the makers of playing-cards of the city of London. It is governed by a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants; but has neither livery nor hall.

Carmen. 89.

By an act of common council, passed in the reign of Henry VIII. the carmen were constituted a fellowship of the city of London; and, in 1606, they were incorporated with the fraternity of fuellers, under the denomination of woodmongers, with whom they continued till the year 1668, when the latter having been convicted by the parliament of enormous frauds in the sale of coals, and being apprehensive of the consequences, threw up their charter: on which the carmen were re-appointed a fellowship, by an act of common-council, under the title of The free carmen of the city of London.

The regulation of the carmen is vested in the city magistracy under an act of parliament made in the thirteenth year of George II. and the prices which the carmen are allowed to charge are determined by the same authority. The right of licensing carts for hire within the city, has been given by an act of common council to Christ's Hospital; the licenses confer the exclusive privileges of doing all cart work for hire within the city and its liberties.

They are governed by a master, two wardens, and forty-one assistants, under the direction of the court of lord mayor and aldermen, but have neither arms, hall nor livery.

Carpenters. 26.

Arms. Ar. a chevron ingrailed between three pair of compasses, expanded at the points sa.

This ancient fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of Edward IV. bearing date the 7th of July, 1344, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty, of the mystery of freemen of the carpenters of the city of London; with a power to make bye-laws for their better regulation.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, wardens, and court of assistants.

Carpenters'-hall is situated on the south side of London-wall.

R. Wyatt, esq. thrice master of this company, in 1604, 1605, and 1616, founded an alms-house at Godalming in Surrey, for 10 poor men.

Clock-Makers. 61.

Arms.Granted Jan. 13, 1671. Sa. a clock, each of the four corner pillars of the case erected on a lion couchant, and on each capital a mound, thereon a cross pattee, and on the dome of the case an imperial crown, supported by circular arches, springing from the pillars, under which arches the bell appears, and on the centre of the dial plate, a double rose, all or. Crest. A sphere or. Supporters. The dexter, an emblematical figure, representing Time; the sinister, the portrait of an emperor in his robes, on his head an imperial crown, and in his sinister hand a sceptre, surmounted of a dove, all proper. Motto. Tempus rerum imperator. This fraternity was incorporated by Charles I. in the year 1632, by the name of The master, wardens, and society of the art of clock-makers of the city of London. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, wardens, and twenty-eight assistants.

Coach and Coach Harness Makers. 79.

Arms. Az. a chevron between three coaches or. Crest. Clouds proper, thereon Phoebus driving the chariot of the sun or, drawn by four horses ar, harnessed, reined, and bridled, of the second. Supporters. Two horses or. harnessed and bridled, 8a. studded or, garnished gu. housings az. fringed and pur fled of the third; each horse adorned on the head with a plume of four feathers, of the following colours, viz. or, ar. az. and gu. Motto. Surgit nubila Phoebus. The company of coachmakers was incorporated in 1671, by letters patent of Charles II. by the name and style of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty, of the company of coach and coach-harness-makers of London. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-three assistants.

Comb-Makers. 63.

Arms. Az. a lion passant guardant between three combs, or. Crest. A mount, thereon an elephant, standing against a tree, all proper.

The comb-makers' company was incorporated by king Charles I. in the year 1636, by the name of The master, wardens, and fellowship, of the comb-makers of London. This is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and thirteen assistants.

Cooks. 35.

Arms. AZ. a chevron ingrailed gu. between three columbines proper, stalked and leaved vert. Crest. Amount vert, thereon a cock pheasant-proper. Supporters The dexter a buck proper, attired or; the sinister a hind proper, each pierced in the shoulder with an arrow or. Motto. Vulnerati non victu.

This society was incorporated by letters patent of King Edward IV. in the year 1480, by the name of The masters, and governors, and commonalty, of the mystery of cooks, in London. This was subsequently re-confirmed by queen Elizabeth, and afterwards by king James, in the 13th of his reign.

Every person who is desirous of becoming a member of this company must be presented to the lord mayor, before he can be admitted to the freedom.A cook was in former times set upon the pillory because he sold picam olentum, i. e. a stinking pike. Strype's Stow, vol. ii. p. 207.

This is a livery company, and governed by a master, four wardens, and twenty-five assistants. They had formerly a convenient hall in Aldersgate-street, which was destroyed by fire in 1771, and not being rebuilt, the business of the company is transacted at Guildhall.

Coopers. 36.

Arms. Gyronny of eight gu. and sa. on a chevron between three annulets or, a grose between two adzes az. on a chief vert, three lilies slipped, stalked, and leaved or. Crest. A demi heath-cock, with wings expanded, az. powdered with annulets or; in the beak a lily ar. Supporters. Two camels gu. bridled or, powdered with annulets of the last. Motto. Love as brethren.

The coopers' company was incorporated in 1501, by letters patent of king Henry VII. under the title of The master, wardens, keepers, and commonalty of the freemen of the mystery of coopers in London, and the suburbs of the same city, and, in the succeeding reign, was empowered, by an act of parliament, to search and gauge all beer, ale, and soap vessels, within the city of London, and two miles round its suburbs, for which they were allowed a farthing for each cask. They are governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty assistants, and their livery are very numerous.

The hall of this company is situated on the east side of Basinghall-street.

The Names of the Company of Coupers from the Record in the Chapter-house. John CherleyWillm. Hichwiche Hervey MaxfeldThomas Franke John ClerkeStephn Gybson Rogier TyrysRoland Kendall John Cloker the elderRoland Hunter Willm. MyntonWillm. Chapman Thomas AwoodeRobert Belhowse John WillysMartyn Burwell Robert HassyllReynold Abardisley John BasleyThomas Grygson Olyner WhithedeThomas Monday John Cloker the yongerHumfrey Marshall Richard ByrdHenry Lawrence John NokesThomas Buttler Robert BethycotesThomas Tanstall John BattThomas Steyllorage Thomas WillmsonThomas Fforster John WhithedeRobert Bell Richard TryggSaunder Edwards John JohnsonJohn Hasyll Thomas HowseThomas Ffurnes Willm. WhiteJohn Edmonds John GriffynJohn Billisborowe Water GervisThomas Gentilman Edmond ColynsRobert Hall Thomas JohnsonCristofer Thorneton Richard ThornetonThomas Turner Robert SwaneJohn Thressher Willm. AndrewesJohn Hethe Hugh PurkePatrike Gage Peter CurreJohn Brasier John Amyas

Cordwainers. 27.

Arms. Az. a chevron or between three goats, erased ar. attired of the second. Crest. A goat's head erased ar attired or.

The company of cordwainers, or shoemakers, was at first incorporated by king Henry VI. in the 17th year of his reign, by the name of cordwainers and coblers; the latter of which names was at that time far from being contemptible, as it signified not only a shoemaker, but a dealer in shoes; nor does it appear that the word shoemaker was then in use.

The cordwainers had a privilege, or at least a custom, beyond other tradesmen, to sit and sell their shoes on Sundays.

Since the original incorporation, the company have obtained a fresh charter, by which they are now called, The master, wardens, and commonalty of the mystery of cordwainers of the city of London. It is a livery company. They have a handsome hall in Distaff-lane.

The Names of the Company of Cordwayners from the Record in the Chapter-house. Thomas NycolsonHenry Edwards Peter PetersonEdmond Spencer Robert RabonHarry Ball Thomas ArcherMathiew Gibson Willm. GybsonHewe Welshe Thomas ThrederRobert Willis Willm. DenysHenry Roese Thomas RayntonWillm. Robyns Robert OwtredJohn Waren Edmond MedeThomas Clare Edward PechyJohn Andrewes Edmond BakerRichard Andrewes James BanesterRichard Sparowe Richard MeygerRobert Pyman John DeyJohn Bacon Rowland DentRogier Anderson Richard BedallWillm. Russell John DyrykeRichard Empson Raffe DyerJohn Lawson Barnard KyngstonMathiew Melton Thomas PacyGeorge Cocks Richard PetersonRichard Banester Robert HorseyRobert Waldon Rice DavieRichard Norry John HillesNicholas Sylkby Richard RaseJohn Parrott Thomas PollJohn Taylor. John MoreThomas More

Curriers. 29.

Arms. Az. a cross ingrailed or, between four pair of curriers' shaves in saltier ar. handled of the second. Crest. Two arms embowed proper, vested to the elbow ar. issuing from clouds of the first, holding in their hands a shave, as in the arms. Supporters. The dexter a buck proper, attired and hoofed or., the sinister a goat ar. armed and hoofed or. Motto. Spes nostra Deus.

The curriers are a company of considerable antiquity, and founded a guild or brotherhood in the conventual church of Whitefriars, in Fleet-street, in the year 1367. King James I. incorporated them on the 30th of April, 1605, by the style of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or mystery of the curriers of the city of London.

It is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and a court of assistants.

Curriers' hall is situated on the south side of London wall.

The Names of the Company of Curryars from the Record in the Chapter-house. Olyver AbbotHugh Davy Nicholas BromefeldPhilip Kover Edmond HurlokeThomas Bromefeld George FfoysterJohn Alcoke Willm. StokesGermane Howman John RawePeter Smythe John FforestRichard Lyon John AlysanderThomas Alyson John BlaklockThomas Barnes John EdwardsWillm. Ffisher John GodfreyThomas Berdswrothe John AndersbyHenry Haryson Robert EderygeAlane Bygmore John BurnamJohn Baynam Thomas LargeRobert Mason Christofer WashfordRichard Logston Robert JohnsonHugh Davy Willm. ShiptonJohn Staly Willm HeywardThomas Wilkynson

Cutlers. 18.

Arms.Arms granted 16 Edw, iv, 1476, Gu. three pair of swords in saltier ar. hilts and pomels or, viz. two pair in chief, and one in base. Crest. An elephant ar. armed or; on his back a castle of the last, the trappings, girts, &c. of the second; in the top of the tower two pennons inclining to the dexter and sinister, gu. Supporters. Two elephants, ar. Motto. Pour parvenir a bonnefoi.

The cutlers' company was incorporated by king Henry V. in the year 1417, by the style of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the mystery of cutlers of London. The cutlers formerly were three companies, viz. bladers,Smiths that forged blades. haftmakers,Makers of the hafts of blades. and sheathmakers.Makers of sheaths for swords; daggers, knives, &c.

It is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants.

The hall of this company is situated in Cloak-lane; it is a small brick building.

The Names of the Company of Cutlers, from the Records in the Chapter-house. Hugh HolmesJohn Sterop Thomas AtkynsonRobert Bell John GilesRobert Haryson John WilfordMiles a Northe John HarrisonAntony Messyngere John HaylandWillm. Aleyn Marion GarrettJohn Key Willm. SyrmondsonAntony Togyll Willm. MarlerThomas Jacson John HawkynsWillm. Chatborne, Richard CarterJohn Fforster Thomas ClyffArche Wykham John SmytheJohn Symondson Cristofer A LeeNicholas Humfrey John BartonRobert Eltham Thomas WormeChad Scott John ButtWillm. Thorpp Henr. HeymondRaufe Bryce John PorterJohn Myghell Willm. PageThomas Ffyreby Rogier GrisswellWillm. Smythe John Leycestr.Thomas Owen Thomas HumfreyRichard Ffanser John CrathorneThomas Colynson John ThornetonMighell Baker Richard RomeHenry Johnson Rogier CurwynRichard Barrett John JeromRichard Colynson Willm. HarysonThomas Malynger Robert LashfordGeorge Bowre Hugh BoswellThomas Thorpp John YewardSymond Bowmer Willm. Symondson

Distillers. 74.

Arms. Az. a fesse wavy ar. in chief the sun in splendour, encircled with a cloud distilling drops of rain, all proper; in base a distillatory double armed or on a fire proper, with two worms and bolt receivers of the second. Crest, A garb of barley, environed with a vine fructed, both proper, Supporters. The dexter, the figure of a man representing a Russian, habited in the dress of the country, all proper; the sinister, an Indian, vested round the waist with feathers of various colours, wreathed about the temples with feathers as the last; in his hand a bow, at his back a quiver of arrows, all proper. Motto. Drop as rain, distill as dew.

The distillers were incorporated by king Charles I. in the year 1638, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the trade, art, or mystery of distillers of London.

This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, three wardens, and nineteen assistants: but having no hall belonging to it, the meetings of the company are held at Drapers'-hall.

Dyers. 13.

Arms. Sa. a chevron ingrailed ar. between three bags of madder of the last, corded or. Crest. Three sprigs of the grain tree, erect vert, fructed gu. Supporters. Two leopards rampant guardant ar. spotted with various colours, fire issuing from their ears and mouth proper, both ducally crowned, or. Motto. Da gloriam Deo.

This company was made a brotherhood by Henry VI. in the year 1472, by the name of The wardens and commonalty of the mystery of the dyers of London. Among other privileges granted to this company by their charter, is that of keeping swans on the river Thames. This was originally one of the twelve principal companies, but is now numbered as the thirteenth. It is a livery company, governed by two wardens, and thirty assistants.

Embroiderers. 48.

Arms. Paly of six ar. and az. on a fesse gu. between three lions passant guardant or, two broaches in saltier, between two trundles (i. e. quills of gold thread) or. Crest. A dove displayed ar, encircled with glory proper. Supporters. Two lions or, guttee de sang. Motto. Omnia desuper.

The embroiderers were incorporated in 1561, by letters patent of queen Elizabeth, by the name of The keepers, or wardens and company of the art and mystery of broderers of the city of London. They are a livery company, governed by two keepers or wardens and forty assistants.

The hall of this company is on the north side of Gutter-lane.

The Names of the Company of Browderers, from the Records in the Chapter-house. Thomas PackardRobt. Totty Thomas TipladyWillm. Mersse Willm. EdgraveRichard Hymnam Thomas YongDenys Kyshole Richard MaisterAndrewe Halbot Robert EdgraveWillm. Rose Thomas BradeleyRobert Borre John MediltonWillm. Chese John HarrisonEdmond Thodson Willm. AnsleyWillm. Johnson John Low theWillm. Smythe Richard CorbetRogier Bansted John BrownHarry Summ Robert WardJohn Evorsby Richard PeresonWillm. Smythe John NevillBartholome Bryckilwoth John Redyng

Fan Makers. 84.

Arms. Or, a fan displayed, with a mount of various devices and colours, the sticks gu. on a chief, per pale gu. and az. on the dexter side, a shaving iron over a bundle of fan-sticks tied together, or; on the sinister side, a framed saw, in pale, of the last. Crest. a hand couped-proper, holding a fan displayed or. Motto. Arts and trades united.

This company was incorporated by queen Anne in the year 1709, by the appellation of The master, wardens, assistants, and society of the art or mystery of fan-makers of the cities of London and Westminster, and twenty miles round the same. This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty assistants.

Farriers. 55.

Arms. Ar. three horse-shoes sa. pierced of the field. Crest. An arm embowed, issuing from clouds on the sinister side, all proper, holding in the hand a hammer az. handled, and ducally crowned or. Supporters. Two horses ar, Motto. Vi et virtute.

This fraternity was incorporated by king Charles II. in the year 1673, by the style of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the company of farriers, London.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-four assistants. Having no hall, they meet at the George and Vulture, Cornhill.

Felt Makers. 64.

Arms. Ar. a dexter hand couped at the wrist gu. between two hat-bands nowed az. in chief, a hat sa. banded of the third. Crest. A naked arm embowed proper, holding in the hand a hat sa. banded az.

The felt or hat-makers were anciently united with the haberdashers; but a separation being obtained by the former, they were by letters patent of James I. in the year 1604, incorporated by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or mystery of felt-makers of London.

This is a livery company, governed by a master, four wardens, and twenty-five assistants. They hold their meetings at Pewterers' hall.

Fishermen. 87.

The company of fishermen was incorporated by letters patent of James II. in the year 1687, by the name of The free fishermen of London. But they have neither livery, hall, nor arms.

Fletchers. 39.

Arms.Granted 2 Hen. vii, 1487. Az. a chevron between three arrows or, headed and feathered ar. Crest. A demi-angel proper, with wings indorsed or, vested of the last, holding a bundle of arrows or.

Though this is only a company by prescription, it has nevertheless obtained a coat of arms and a livery; and appears to be in all respects as firmly established as those incorporated by letters patent. It is governed by two wardens, and ten assistants. They had formerly a convenient hall in St. Mary Axe; but it having for some years past, been used as a warehouse for goods, they now meet at the George and Vulture in Cornhill.

The Names of the Company of Ffletchers from the Record in the Chapter-house. Willm. ShermanThomas Sherman Richard HughsonJohn Stodard Willm. TempleHugh Jonson John WylshireRobert Griffyn Willm. SmytheJohn Tomlynson Thomas HygsonThomas Jakett Lewes OwenRichard Gryffyn Thomas NeleJohn Cartwright John FfremyngerRichard Blacher Robert MichellRichard Salford Thomas SmytheRichard Clerke Nycholas BageleyThomas Hasylwall John RomynRichard Pkynson John HeronRichard Hertwell Willm. NortheFfraunces Richardson Robert BraseWillm. Birde Robert MalynneAntony Tomson, the elder John StarkyAntony Tomson, the younger Nicholas StoneOwen Beddowe John GreneWillm. Lyndesey John PhilippsMaurice Wykes John FflodeLeonarde Chambre

Founders. 33.

Arms.Granted October 13, 1590. Az. a laver-pot (i. e. vase) between two taper candlesticks or. Crest. A fiery furnace proper; two arms, of the last, issuing from clouds, on the sinister side of the first, vested ar. holding in both hands a pair of closing-tongs sa. taking hold of the melting pot in the furnace proper. Motto. God the only founder.

The fraternity of founders was incorporated by letters patent of the twelfth of James I. in the year 1614, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the mystery of founders of the city of London; and they have power to search all brass weights, and brass and copper wares, within the city of London, and three miles thereof. And all makers of brass weights within that circuit are obliged to have their several weights sized by the company's standard, and marked with their common mark: and such of these weights as are of avoirdupois weight, to be sealed at the Guildhall of this city, and those of troy-weight at Goldsmiths'-hall.

It is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants. The hall of this company is in Lothbury.

The Names of the Company of Ffounders from the Record in the Chapter-house. Thomas RayltonHenry Whight Edward ColyngwoodThomas Bromeshawke Rogier TailorThomas Hawes ----WysseThomas Preston Thomas PaxtonJohn Gykes John JutterPeter Spencer Willm. FfordeJohn Sewen Thomas LawrenceRobert Mapilbeeke John BereJohn Brewer John SewynWillm. Baker Humfrey WightGeorge Edway Willm. AbbottWill. Shortred John ChamberRobert Ffawconer Willm. AdamesJohn Ray ton John DandesonThomas Tanner Robert HenstokeThomas Palmer David SothemThomas Thaxted Christofer StuksThomas Goodhand Thomas StacyHenry Monke John SkyeRichard Richardson Robert LawenRoger Bere Willm. SewenGeorge Shutton John WilkinsonThomas Spencer Richard CliffordThomas Hartred John FfremanRichard Jackson Thomas GrigbyRichard Leeds Robert FforsteJames Sede Riogier MasonWillm. Hawes Thomas FfoxRichard Poumfrete John StephnsonThomas Perte John GreneWillm. Rawlyns Henry AleynThomas Barley John Hunt

Framework-Knitters. 65.

Arms. Ar. a knitting-frame sa. garnished or, with work pendant in base gu. Supporters. The dexter, a student of the university of Oxford, vested proper, the sinister, a woman proper, vested az. handkerchief, apron, and cuffs to the gown ar. in her dexter hand a knitting-needle, and in her sinister a piece of worsted knit, gu. Motto. Speed, strength, and truth, united.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of Charles II. in the year 1663, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and society of the art and mystery of framework-knitters in the cities of London and Westminster, the kingdom of England, and dominion of Wales. It is a livery company, and is under the direction of a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants.

Fruiterers. 45.

Arms. Az. on a mount inbase vert, the tree of Paradise, environed with the serpent between Adam and Eve, all proper. Motto. Arbor vitae Christus; fructus per fidem gustamus.

This company was incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1605, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the mystery of fruiterers of London.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and thirty assistants.

The Names of the Company of Ffruterers, from the Record in the Chapter-house. David GarrattMarks Lacke Thomas HorreThomas Karne Patrike CornysheJohn Hetyll Willm. CantwellRobert Tewte Nicholas HarrysJohn Ireland Patrike GallymoreStephen Austyn John BryanSwalyg Staule Richard GrenwayNicholas Bordyn Derbe RyanWillm. Gilsnan Richard HerrysCharles Moreton Thomas GoodheweJohn Garve Willm. DalamereThomas Hedyn Willm. BryneJohn Hewett Nicholas GarveJohn Ryon Robt. SheeRobert Porsell Philipp HarollWater Garrett Willm. PronRichard Grenway Willm. RocheDavid Comyn Thomas JohnsonThomas Bolton John Garrett

Gardeners. 70.

Arms. The field, a landscape, the base variegated with flowers; a man proper, vested round the loins with linen ar. digging with a spade, all of the first. Crest. A basket of fruit, all proper. Supporters. Two emblematical female figures, with cornucopiae representing Plenty. Motto. In the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat thy bread.

The gardeners were incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1616, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the company of gardeners of London. Though this company is incorporated by charter, yet it has neither hal or livery. It is governed by a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants; and its meetings are held at Guildhall.

Girdlers. 23.

Arms.Granted 32 Hen. vi. 1354. Per fesse az. and or, a pale counterchanged; three gridirons of the last, the handles in chief. Crest. A demi-man proper, representing St. Lawrence, with glory round his head or, issuing out of clouds of the first, vested az. girt round the body with a girdle of the second, holding in his dexter hand a gridiron of the last, and in the sinister a book ar. Motto. Give thanks to God.

This company was incorporated in the twenty-seventh of Henry VI. on the 6th of August, 1449; and re-incorporated with the pinners and wire-drawers by queen Elizabeth on the 12th of October, 1568, by the name of The master and wardens or keepers of the art or mystery of the girdlers of London.

It is a livery company, governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-four assistants. The hall of this company is situated in Basinghall-street.

Glaziers. 53.

Arms. Ar. two grozing irons in saltier sa. between four closing nails of the last; on a chief gu. a lion passant guardant or. Crest. A lion's head couped or, between two wings expanded ar. Supporters. TWO naked boys proper, each holding a long torch inflamed of the last. Motto. Da nobis lucena, Domine.

This company was incorporated with that of the glass-painters by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1337, by the appellation of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or mystery of glaziers and painters of glass of the city of London. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants; but their hall having been destroyed by the fire in 1666, was not rebuilt. Their meetings are held at present at the New London Tavern.

Glass-Sellers. 77.

The glass-sellers and looking-glass-makers were incorporated by king Charles II. in the year 1664, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of glass-sellers of the city of London. It is a livery company, under the direction of a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants. They meet at the Antwerp tavern.

Glovers. 62.

Arms.Granted Oct. 20. 1464. Per fesse sa. and ar. a pale counter-changed; three rams salient of the second, two and one, armed and unguled or. Crest. A ram's head ar. issuing from a basket of the last, between two wings expanded gu.

The company of glovers was not incorporated till the fourteenth of Charles I. who, on the 5th of September, in the year 1638, granted them a charter by the name and style of The master, wardens, and fellowship of the company of glovers of the city of London. It is a livery company, governed by a master, four wardens, and thirty assistants. Their hall in Beech-lane having gone to decay, they meet at the George and Vulture, Cornhill.

Gold and Silver Wire-Drawers. 81.

Arms. Az. on a chevron or, between two coppers in chief of the second, in base, two points in saltier ar. a drawing iron between two rings (i. e. tools used by wire-drawers) sa. Crest. Two arms embowed, vested gu. cuffed ar. holding between their hands proper, an engrossing block or. Supporters. The dexter an Indian proper, crowned with an eastern crown or, vested round the middle with feathers pendant alternately ar. and gu. holding over his shoulder a bar of silver: the sinister, a man vested proper, (called in the grant a silk throwster) in his sinister hand a hank of silk ar. Motto. Amicitiam trahit amor.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1623, by the name of The governor, assistants, and commonalty, &c. but being re-incorporated by king William and queen Mary, in the year 1693, the title was changed to that of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the art and mystery of drawing and flatting of gold and silver wire, and making and spinning of gold and silver thread and stuffs, in our city of London.

This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants.

Gun-Makers. 80.

Arms. Ar. two guns in saltier proper, in chief, the letter G. in base, the letter v, sa. each crowned with a regal crown; on the dexter side in fesse a barrel, and on the sinister three balls, all of the second.

This society was incorporated by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1638, by the name of The master, wardens, and society of gun-makers of the city of London.

It is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants. They hold their meetings at Guildhall.

Hat-Band Makers. 75.

Arms. Az. on a chevron between three hat-bands, or, as many merillions sa.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles I. in the year 1638, by the appellation of The master, wardens, assistants, and fellowship of the mystery of hatband-makers of the city of London. It is governed by a master, two wardens, and twelve assistants, but has not any livery or hall.

When rich hat-bands were much worn, this company was in a very flourishing condition; but that fashion having been many years laid aside, the business is now so reduced, that there are very few of the profession, who meet at present in Cutlers'-hall.

Horners. 54.

Arms. Ar. on a chevron between three leather bottles sa., as many bugle horns stringed of the first.

This company is of great antiquity, and was incorporated by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1638, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants and commonalty of the art and mystery of horners of the city of London.

Considerable quantities of horns were formerly exported by this company. In the year 1576, were shipped 140,000 horns, valued at 210l.

It consists of a master, two wardens, and nine assistants, but has no livery or hall,

Innholders. 32.

Arms. Az. a chevron per pale and per chevron gu. and ar. counter-changed between three garbs or, on a chief ar. two batons crossed at each end sa. in Saltier, the dexter surmounted by the sinister, commonly called St. Julian's cross. Crest. An etoile of sixteen points or, issuing from clouds in base proper. Supporters. Two horses regardant ar. Motto Hinc spes affulget. PATRON. St. Julian.

This company was incorporated by king Henry VIII. on the 21st of December, 1515, by the name of The master, wardens, and company of the art or mystery of innholders of the city of London. It is a livery company, governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty assistants The hall of this company is a small edifice in Little Elbow-lane.

The Names of the Company of Inholders, from the Record in the Chapter-house. Mr. CroftonJohn Nevill John SmaleJohn Yerwood John SmytheRogier Andrewes John GermondRichard Hodges Mr. BarkerRobert Grubbe Mr. ChurcheRobert Hilton Mr. JohnesJohn Hyde Thomas WoodWillm, Isott Richard HoweNicholas Coke Richard GeffordEustace Kytley Willm. DaviesJohane Cornncle John CoopeJohn Shepard Henry SaunderBede Edgrave Henry WardeWillm. Saunder John WatsonRobert Godby John BullokeThomas Ranenyng Thomas HawesNicholas Grocer Richard HudsonJohn Braken Thomas LorymerJohn Walles John HarrysHenry Bayte John EdlynWillm. Ffrenche Thomas Bacle

Joiners. 41.

Arms. Gu. a chevron ar. between two pair of compasses in chief, extended at the points, and a sphere in base or; on a chief of the last a pale az between two roses gu. seeded of the third, barbed vert; on the pale an escollop shell of the second. Crest. A demi-savage proper, wreathed about the head and waist with leaves vert, holding in his dexter hand, over his shoulder, a tilting spear or, headed ar. Supporters. Two naked boys proper; the dexter holding in his hand an emblematical female figure, crowned with a mural coronet sa. The sinister holding in his hand a square. Motto. Join truth with trust.

This company existed in the time of Henry VII. but was not incorporated till the year 1569, when queen Elizabeth granted them her letters patent, by the name of The master, and wardens, and commonalty of the faculty of the joiners and ceilers of London. It is a livery company, governed by a master, wardens, and twenty-four assistants.

The Names of the Company of Joyners, from the Record in the Chapter-house. Thomas ChapmanPeter Hadwike Thomas SpencerThomas Hadwike John ManggamJohn Clerk Willm. LawesWillm. Mamount Thomas PeterboroweAdam Hubbart John KipleyThomas Sandy John PoleThomas Lowe Willm. PeeleThomas Mannyng Edmond WyttonThomas Edyngrave Robert DayJohn Steboll Thomas BonevauntJohn Rippingale Willm. BakerWillm. Wymbyll John CampionWillm. Morys Thomas StoweThomas Squyer Stephn SampsonRichard Evill Henr. SaveacreRichard Pye John GosseHenry Jonson Thomas JohnsonThomas Dyryman Richard RyggsJohn Ffowche Richard RogiersWillm. Raynham Richard MathiewJohn Shirborne Symon BenefildRichard Carre James MyllerJohn Dykson John HawesJohn Ludeby John ComeynJohn Johnson Edward SquyerNicholas Webster

Leathersellers. 15.

Arms. Ar. three bucks trippant regardant gu. attired and unguled sa. Crest. A demi-buck gu. attired and unguled sa. Supporters. The dexter, a buck or, attired sa., the sinister a ram ar. attired or. Motto. Deo honor et gloria.

The company of leathersellers was a brotherhood of ancient standing, having been incorporated in the 6th year of Richard II. They were subsequently re-incorporated by a charter from king Henry VI. in 1442, by the style of The wardens and society of the mystery or art of leathersellers of the city of London. And, by a grant from king Henry VII. the wardens of this company were empowered to inspect sheep, lamb, and calf leather, throughout the kingdom, in order to prevent frauds in those commodities. It is a livery company. The corporation is governed by a prime and three wardens, and twenty-six assistants. Since their hall has been pulled down, this company meets in a house in Little St. Helen's, belonging to themselves, but at present let on lease.

The Names of the Company of Lether Sellers, from the Record in the Chapter House. John HodsallThomas Starkey Henry GoodyereWillm. Witham Humfrey LucyJohn Maxwell Water ThomasThomas Thomson Thomas AbrahamRichard Newton Robert BisshoppJohn Care John CurticeJohn Armesby Willm. WymanRichard Hardy Willm. VeerAleyne Tackill Willm. SilverEdward Tamffeld Otes WhittalsJohn Harrys Edward SaundersRichard Monmouthe Thomas KendallThomas Kirkeby Nichus BaytonJohn Lyke John ElyoteJohn Langwithe John WebbeRichard Symson Willm. RogiersonJohn Wade John CirrokeWillm. Cowike Robert FfermarSymon Waeerffall Hugh EglyffeldJohn Johnson Nicholas GravenJohn Newton John PechereRobert Lieche Willm. GreneNicholas Browne Anthony SylverJohn Sowche Thomas BromefeldJames Johnson John MayneThomas Styvynson Edmond SmytheRobert Comen John ButlerJohn Pope Richard RandThomas Sewester Robert ReysonJohn Valiant Edmond WhiteHerry Symons Thomas EdwardsThomas Bordis John BarnardHerry White John DeneWillm. Gootes John GreneWillm. Pecok George FfrytheRoger Barnard Richard PhilippsThomas Rancok Robert LucieJohn Phillip Thomas SwetonWillm. Edward Thomas ElyattGeorge Bridges Willm. CurleweThomas Smythe Robert JnettRichard Busshe Laurence Cornewe, SergeantRobert Esyngton Hugh WatheEdmond Lister Thomas WhitbrokeWillm. Crofton Willm. HullmWillm. Aleyn George MeelemanThomas Adnell Willm. SuttonJohn Whittall ThomasJohn Ffisher Edward FflaggeHenry Hill Nicholas DomyThomas Johnson John RedeJohn Cockys Thomas FfillipRobert Coke John MaryThomas Chamber Thomas VnstedeJohn Hasselwode Willm. NewmanRobert Wode Thomas Kendall

Long Bow String-Makers. 82.

Arms. Az. a hank or knot of bowstring in pale or; on a chief ar. three bows. Crest. A man, vested proper, shooting with a bow and arrow of the last. Motto. Nec habeo, nec careo, nec curo.

This is not a company by charter, but only by prescription; and may therefore be considered as an adulterine guild. However, it has obtained a coat of arms, and in point of precedence is numbered the eighty-second on the city list. It consists only of two wardens, and a small number of assistants; but has not any livery or hall.

Loriners. 57.

Arms. Az. on a chevron ar, between three manage-bits or, as many bosses sa.

Though the company of Loriners (that is, makers of spurs, bridlebits, and other articles of iron for harness is very ancient, they were only incorporated by letters patent of queen Anne, in the year 1712, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of loriners of London.

This is a livery company, under the government of a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants. Not having had a hail for some years, the affairs of this company are transacted at the Nag's-head in Leadenhall-street.

Masons. 30.

Arms. Sa. on achevron, between three towers ar. a pair of compasses of the first. Crest. A tower as in the arms. Motto. In the Lord is all our Trust.

The company of masons was originally incorporated 2 Hen. II. 1411, by the name and style of The free masons. In 1474, William Hanckstow, Clarencieux king at arms, granted them the arms of their society, as borne at this time; but the present company act under the re-incorporation granted by letters patent of the 12th of Charles II. on the 17th September, 1677, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty, of the company of masons of the city of London. It is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-two assistants.

The marblers,They appear to have been sculptors, and were much distinguished for their skill in carving figures on monuments and grave stones. an ancient fellowship, but not legally incorporated, was united to this community. Mason's-hall is situated in Mason's alley, Basinghall-street; it is now rented by a carpet manufacturer.

The Names of the Company of Ffreemasones, from the Record in the Chapter House. Robert LynkeJohn Paskyn George SymsonJohn Heward Mr. ElmerWillm. Rigeway Thomas NewellJohn Richardson John OrgerJohn Sorbett Thomas WestThomas Wilde Willm. PrybellFfraunces Boone Gabriell CaldhamWillm. Holmes Henry PestemedeThomas Blomefeld Willm. JonsonRobert Hawte Willm. AshtonEdmond Raud John HumfreyThomas Hawys Willm. ChamberlainSymond Kyngffeld Robert SleefordJohn Charter Richard MydiltonRichard Wolsham Thomas BarkerThomas Watson Henry MercerLewys Tucker Robt. SmytheRobert Prybell Gilbert Borffam

Musicians. 50.

Arms.Granted 1604. Az. a swan, with wings expanded ar. within a double tressure flory counter flory or; on a chief gu. a pale, between two lions passant guardant or; thereon a rose of the fourth, seeded of the third, barbed vert. Crest. A lyre. or.

This society was incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1604, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or science of the musicians of London. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty assistants.

Needle-Makers. 69.

Arms. Vert, three needles in fesse ar. each ducally crowned or. Crest. A Moor's head, couped at the shoulders, in profile, proper, wreathed about the temples ar. and gu. vested round the shoulder ar. in his ear a pearl. Supporters. A man on the dexter side, a woman on the sinister, both proper, each wreathed round the waist with leaves of the last; in the woman's dexter hand, a needle ar.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of Oliver Cromwell, 10th November, 1656, by the name of The master, wardens, and society of the art and mystery of needle-makers of the city of London.

This is a livery company, under the government of a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants. Having no hall, this company meet at that belonging to the cutlers.

Painter-Stainers. 28.

Arms.Arms granted, 1486-confirmed, 1531. Quarterly, first and fourth, az. three escutcheons ar. two and one; second and third ar. A chevron, between three phoenix heads, erased or. Crest. A phoenix close or. in flames proper. Supporters. Two leopards ar. Spotted with various colours, ducally crowned, collared and chained, or. Motto. Amor et obedientia.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of queen Elizabeth, in the year 1580, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the freedom of the art and mystery of painting called painter-stainers, within the city of London. Of this company was Sampson Camden, the father of the learned William Camden Clarencieux, king at arms, who in memory thereof gave them a gilt bowl of the value of 16l. thus inscribed, Guil. Camdenus clarencieux, filius Sampsonis pictoris Londinensis dono dedit.

It is a livery company, and governed by a master, two wardens, and nineteen assistants.

The hall of this company is a small brick edifice standing on the west side of Little Trinity-lane.

The Names of the Company of Paynter Stayners , from the Record in the Chapter House. Thomas AlysaunderJohn Asplyn Richard CallardGeffrey Brown John SmythRichard Welshe John HetheWillm. Camden Richard RippingaleJohn Grenwood Thomas PriorWillm. Chessherd Andrewe WrightJohn Leed Richard GatesThomas Spencer Richard LameWater Grome Humfrey HarecourteThomas Cobbe Robt. WrythokeThomas Bulloke Davy MartynGuy Cobage Willm. LucasHenry Lord Thomas ChristyneThomas Vncle Richard HeleGeorge Dauntry Willm. CaltonGeorge Byrrell John WysedomJohn Ffeltis Thomas HiltonThomas Clerke Guy BenetNicholas Rogerson John ParysJohn Pegrym John ChildJohn Wolmote Willm. BlakmoreNichus Wolmote Robt. RowseJames Trevison Ffowke AconweyThomas Gybson Hugh GwynThomas Overed Davy PlanePeter Marten Laurence Underwood

Parish Clerks. 88.

Arms.Granted 1582-confirmed 1634. Az. A fleur de lis or; on a chief gu. a leopard's head between two song books (shut) of the second, stringed vert. Crest. A cubit arm erect, vested az. cuffed ermine, holding in the hand proper, a music book (open) of the last, garnished or, striped vert. Motto. Unitas societatis stabilitas.

This company was incorporated by letters patent of Henry III. in the year 1233, by the name of The fraternity of St. Nicholas; by which they were known till re-incorporated by James I. in the year 1611.

These grants were afterwards confirmed by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1636, who incorporated them by the name of The master, wardens, and fellowship of parish clerks of the cities of London, Westminster, borough of Southwark, and fifteen out parishes.

Formerly, this society used to attend funerals of eminent persons, going before the hearse and singing, with their surplices hanging on their arms, till they came to the church.

Some certain days in the year they had their public feasts, which they celebrated with singing and music; and then received into their society such persons as delighted in singing.

This company consists not only of a master, two wardens, and nineteen assistants, but also the whole body of parish clerks within the bills of mortality.

The hall of this company is in Wood-street.

Patten-Makers. 76.

Arms. Gu. on a chevron or. between three pattens ar, tied of the second, the ties lined az. two cutting knives conjoined sa. Crest. A patten as in the arms. Motto. Recipiunt foeminae sustentacula nobis.

The company of patten-makers was incorporated by letters patent of the 22nd Charles II. 2nd August, 1670, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and fellowship of the company of patten-makers of the city of London.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants, and the meetings of the company are held at Guildhall.

Paviours. 56.

Arms. Ar. a chevron between three flag stones, sa. Crest. An arm embowed, vested az. cuffed ar. holding in his hand proper, a pick axe, of the last. Motto. God can raise Abraham children of stones.

This is a company only by prescription, and may therefore be esteemed an adulterine guild. However it has obtained a coat of arms, and in point of precedence among the city companies, is numbered as above. It is governed by a master, three wardens, and twenty-five assistants, but has neither hall nor livery.

Pewterers. 16.

Arms.Granted 1479. Az. on a chevron or, between three antique limbecks ar. as many roses gu, seeded of the second barbed vert. Crest. A mount vert. thereon two arms embowed proper, vested ar. cuffed gu. holding in both hands erect a dish of the third. Supporters. Two sea-horses or, their tails proper. Motto. In God is all my trust.

The fraternity of pewterers was incorporated by letters patent of the thirteenth of Edward IV. in the year 1474, by the title of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art and mystery of pewterers of the city of London. This company used to cast into bars such tin as was intended for exportation. And in the year 1534, the wardens of this company, or their deputies, were empowered by act of parliament to have the inspection of pewter in all parts of the kingdom, in order to prevent the sale of base pewter, and the importation of pewter vessels from abroad. And as a farther encouragement to this company, all Englishmen are by the said act strictly enjoined not to repair to any foreign country to teach the art or mystery of pewterers, on pain of disfranchisement. And for the more effectually preventing the art from being carried abroad, no pewterer shall take as an apprentice the son of an alien.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-eight assistants.

The hall of this company is a brick edifice in Lime-street.

Pin-Makers. 68.

Arms. Vert a demi-virgin, couped at the waist, proper, mantled gu. turned down ermine; her hair dishevelled; on her head an eastern crown or.

This company was incorporated by king Charles I. in the year 1636, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the art or mystery of pin-makers of the city of London. It is governed by a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants; but has no livery.

This company have a hall in Pinner's-hall-court, Old Broadstreet.

Plaisterers. 46.

Arms. Az. a chevron ingrailed or, between two plaisterer's hammers and a trowel ar. in chief, hammers handled of the second, and a treble flat brush in base of the third, handled of the fourth, a rose gu. seeded or, barbed vert, between two fleurs de lis of the first. Crest. A dexter arm embowed, habited or, charged with a bend gu. cuffed of the last, holding in the hand proper, a hammer, as in the arms, ar. handled or. Supporters. Two opinaci vert, purled or, beaked sa. wings gu. Motto. Factum est.

This company was incorporated by king Henry VII. in the year 1501, by the name of The master and wardens of the guild or fraternity of the blessed Mary, of plaisterers, London. And this charter was confirmed by king Charles II. in the year 1667. It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and thirty-two assistants.

The hall of this company is in Addle-street.

Plumbers. 31.

Arms. Or, on a chevron sa. between a cross staff fessewise of the last, inclosed by two plummets az. all in chief, and a level reversed in base of the second, two soldering irons in saltier, between a cutting knife on the dexter, and a shave hook on the sinister, ar. Crest. A triple fountain or, issuing water proper; on the top an angel of the last, vested ar. ducally crowned and winged of the first, holding in the dexter hand a sword, and in the sinister a pair of scales, both or. Over the crest a motto, viz. Justitia et Pax. Motto. In God is all our hope.

This company is of considerable antiquity, and was incorporated by king James I. on the 12th of April 1611, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the mystery of plumbers of the city of London. It is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants.

The hall of this company is in Great Bush-lane, Cannon-street.

The Names of the Company of Plumers, from the Record in the Chapter-house. Cristofer DrayMrs. Waterson John NecsonMrs. Bynes Thomas AcconNicholas Wodcock Willm. RogiersReynald Danyell Richard FfilpottJohn Ffroston Hugh RedeAlene Goldston Willm. WilsonJohn Ramsey Richard RobertsThomas Accliff George HyndeWater Laste Nicholas MelloweCristofer Bellomy Robert WallerWillm. Argentyne Robert HussherGeorge Richard George Grundy

Porters. 90.

This fraternity, which consists of tackle and ticket porters, was constituted by act of common council in the year 1646, with a power of annually choosing from among themselves twelve rulers, viz. six of each denomination, for their good government, and for hearing and determining all differences that might arise between the members of the united body.

The tackle porters are appointed by the twelve principal city companies, and must all be freemen; they are entitled to the work or labour of unshipping, landing, carrying, and housing of all goods imported by, and belonging, to the South Sea Company, and the East India company, and of all other goods and merchandizes coming from any other ports and places, and imported into the port of London; excepting from the east country, and of goods, the growth, product, or manufacture of Ireland, and the British plantations, and goods coming coastwise. Report on the trade and shipping of the port of London, made to the House of Commons, 1796. App. F. f. Before any person can become a tackle porter he must give bond with four sufficient house-keepers as sureties, for 500l. to make restitution for any loss or damage that may be sustained through his neglect or connivance.

The ticket porters are appointed by the corporation, and are exclusively entitled to the work or labour of unshipping, landing, carrying, and housing of pitch, tar, soap, ashes, clapboards, wainscot, fir-poles, masts, deals, oars, chests, tables, flax, and hemp, brought from Dantzic, or any other part or place of the east countries; as also of all iron, ropes, cables, and all other kind of cordage, and of all wood, commonly called green wood; and also of all manner of goods, of the growth, produce, and manufacture of Ireland, and the British plantations; and of all manner of coast goods, except lead; and generally to work under the tackle porters. Report on the trade, App. G. g. Every ticket-porter must be a freeman, and enter into a bond with two sureties for 100l. He must also wear a metal badge, or ticket, when at labour, inscribed with his name and number as registered. The number of ticket porters is upwards of 1500. The necessary rates for all kinds of porterage are determined either by the lord mayor and aldermen, or by act of common council; and the tables are set up for public information at Guildhall. The governor of this fellowship is always an alderman (whose appointment is vested in the court of aldermen), and his decision is final in respect to all differences and controversies that may arise among the members. The hall of this company is a small building on St. Mary's-hill, near Billingsgate.

Poulterers. 34.

Arms. Ar. on a chevron between three storks az. as many swans proper. Crest. On a mural coronet sa. a stork with wings expanded gu. Supporters, Two pelicans or, with wings indorsed, vulning their breasts proper.

The company was incorporated by letters patent of Henry VII. 23rd Jan. 1504, by the name of The master, wardens, and assistants of poulterers, London.

This is a livery company, governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-three assistants.

Sadlers. 25.

Arms. Az. a chevron between three manage saddles complete or. Crest. A horse passant ar. crined, bridled, saddled, and trappings or; on his head a plume of three feathers ar. Supporters. Two horses ar, maned, hoofed, and bridled or, on each head a plume of three feathers, ar. Motto. My trust is in God.

The fraternity of sadlers appears to be of great antiquity, by a convention between them and the dean and chapter of St. Martin's-le-Grand, about the reign of Richard I. But it does not appear that they were legally incorporated till Edward I. granted them a charter by the style of The wardens or keepers, and commonalty of the mystery or art of sadlers of London.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a prime, three other wardens, and a court of assistants.

The hall of this company is situated in Cheapside.

The Names of the Company of Sadlers, from the Record in the Chapter-house. John MayreJohn Hall Willm. StodardJohn Gyll Richard BrownJohn Alestry Michaell BriseworthMathiew Anderson Thomas AunsellYvory Wrastlyn John WardRafe Barker Willm StorrJohn Webbe Robert WaterJohn Mylles Willm. BaynbruggJohn Gardener Edward StewardWillm. Churchman Robt. AydilsayOlyuer Querne Robt. KechynJohn Pease John FfysherWillm. Welles Robert StuardRichard Bradbury Thomas PrattWillm. Barton Hugh jversBartholome Whityng Willm. GurnardJohn Rose Christofer SmytheWillm. Storer Thomas LecheRichard Benard Robert RedeRichard Belet Willm. RedeRobt. Glene John BondeThomas Ffoster Deynis WilsonJohn Selebrand Willm. WittWillm. Crowd Willm. YansonRichard Wilson Nicholas ParottWillm. Curtes Water SpynkeMrs. Danby Robert SmaleThe good wife Pounde Cristofer RobsonThe good wif Coupir Willm. HobsonThe good wif Yong

Scriveners. 44.

ArmsCrest and supporters granted 1634. Az. an eagle with wings expanded or, standing on a book in base, lying fessewise gu. close clasped and garnished of the second, holding in his mouth a penner and inkhorn sa, stringed gu. Crest. A dexter arm issuing from the clouds proper, vested or, cuffed ar. in the hand a pen, as if writing on the wreath. Over the crest a motto, Scribere scientis. Supporters. Two councillors, habited in their gowns and caps as worn in the reign of queen Elizabeth; each holding in his hand a parchment roll proper.

This company, which was originally denominated The writers of the court letters of the city of London, was incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1616, by the name of The master, wardens, and assistants of the society of writers of the city of London.

This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants. They had formerly a hall in Noble-street ; but being reduced to low circumstances, they sold it to the company of coach-makers, in whose possession it still remains.

Shipwrights. 59.

Arms. Az. an antique hulk, the stern terminating with the head of a dragon; in the hulk the ark with three doors in the side, a step-ladder, all or, on a chief ar. the cross of St. George gu, charged on the centre with a lion passant guardant of the second. Crest. An ark or, on ground vert; on the top of the ark a dove ar. holding in the beak an olive branch vert.

This was a society by prescription for a great number of years, but was at length incorporated by king James I. in the year 1605, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or mystery of shipwrights, London.

It is governed by a master, two wardens, and sixteen assistants; and was admitted to have a livery in the year 1782. Their hall, which stood at Ratcliffe Cross, being pulled down, they now meet in the Irish chamber, at Guildhall.

Silkmen. 67.

Arms.Granted 1631, Ar. a ship of three masts in full sail on the sea, in base all proper, on a chief or, a bale of silk, corded proper, between two bundles of silk pendant of the last. Crest. A Janissary guard habited all proper, holding in his dexter hand a battle axe erect, and over his said arm a hank of silk; his sinister hand supporting a shield charged with a sun, all of the last. Supporters. Two camels, each bridled, and loaded with two bales of silk, all proper.

This fraternity was incorporated, by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1631, by the name of The governor, commonalty, and assistants of the art or mystery of silkmen of the city of London. It is under the direction of a governor, and twenty assistants; but has not any livery or hall.

Silk-Throwers. 66.

Arms.Granted 1454. Ar. three bundles or banks of silk in fesse sa, on a chief az. a silk-throwster's mill or. Crest. A mount vert, thereon a mulberry tree, with silkworms variously dispersed, all proper. Supporters. Two Janissary guards proper, habited in the dress of the country, each having a hank of silk hanging over his exterior arm; the dexter holding a battle axe erect, the sinister, a scimetar, the point downwards, of the last. Motto. God in his least creatures.

This art was first practised in London in the reign of queen Elizabeth, by foreigners; whose descendants, and others, in the year 1562, were constituted a fellowship of this city; and by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1630, were incorporated by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the trade, art, or mystery of silk-throwers of the city of London.

This is a livery company governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty assistants.

Soap-Makers. 71.

Arms. Az. a dolphin naiant, between three eel-spears or. Crest. A mount vert; thereon a tree proper, enfiled with a ducal coronet or.

The fraternity of soap-makers was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles I. in the year 1638, by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of soap-makers, London. They consist of a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants; but have no livery or hall.

Spectacle-Makers. 60.

Arms. Ar. three pair of spectacles vert, garnished or, two and one.

This society was incorporated by letters patent of Charles I. in the year 1630, by the name of The master, wardens, and fellowship of spectacle-makers of London.

It is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and fifteen assistants.

Starch-Makers. 86.

Arms. Az. two garbs in saltiers or; on a chief gu. a lion passant guardant or. Crest. A woman's head and breast proper, vested. . . her hair dishevelled, all within a chaplet of wheat, proper. Supporters. The dexter a labouring man, on his head a cap, habited in a short jacket and breeches, stockings and shoes, all proper ; in his dexter hand a hammer erect of the last. The sinister a female figure, representing plenty, in her sinister hand a cornucopiae and round her temples ears of wheat proper.

This company was incorporated by letters patent of James I. in the year 1662, by the appellation of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the art or mystery of starch-makers, London.

They are governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants; but have no livery, or hall.

Stationers. 47.

Arms. Az. on a chevron or, between three bibles laying fessewise gu. garnished, leaved, and clasped of the second (i. e. clasps downwards) an eagle rising proper, inclosed by two roses gu. seeded or, barbed vert; from the top of the chief a demi-circle of glory, edged with clouds proper; therein a dove displayed ar. over the head a circle of the last. Crest. A bible open proper, clasped and garnished or. Motto. Verbum domine manet in aeternum.

This company had existed as a fraternity long previous to the invention of printing, but were not regularly incorporated till the reign of Philip and Mary, when, on the 4th of May, 1556, a charter was granted to the members, for the purpose, as it would seem by the preamble, of making them the court tools in fettering the liberty of the press, and preventing the circulation of all writings that exposed the errors of the Romish church. Know ye, says this curious instrument, that we, considering and manifestly perceiving that several seditious and heretical books, both in verse and prose, are daily published, stamped, and printed, by divers scandalous, schismatical, and heretical persons, not only exciting our subjects and liege-men to sedition and disobedience against us, our crown, and dignity, but also to the renewal and propagating very great and detestable heresies against the faith and sound Catholic doctrine of our Holy Mother, the church, and being willing to provide a proper remedy in this case, we, of our own special favour, certain knowledge, and mere motion, do will, give, and grant, to our beloved and faithful liegemen, &c. freemen of the mystery or art of a stationer of our city of London, and the suburbs thereof, that from henceforth they may be in deed, fact, and name, one body of itself, for ever, and one society corporate for ever, with one master, and two keepers or wardens-and that they may enjoy a perpetual succession. Among the subsequent enactments in this charter which was confirmed by queen Elizabeth, and afterwards by act of parliament in the reign of William and Mary,Mal. Lond. Red. vol. iv. 383. are the following:

That no person within the kingdom of England, or dominions thereof, either by himself, or by his journeymen, servants, or by any other person, shall practise or exercise the art or mystery of printing, or stamping any book, or any thing to be sold, or bargained for, within this our kingdom of England, or the dominions thereof, unless the same person is or shall be one of the society of the aforesaid mystery or art of a stationer of the city aforesaid, at the time of his aforesaid printing or stamping; or has for that purpose obtained our license, or the license of the heirs and successors of our aforesaid queen. That the aforesaid master and keepers or wardens, and their successors for the time being, shall very lawfully as well search, as often as they please, any place, shop, house, chamber, or building, of any stamper, printer, binder, or seller, of any manner of books within our kingdom of England, and dominions thereof, concerning or for any books or things printed, or stamped, or to be printed or stamped, as seize, take away, have, burn, or convert to the proper use of the said society, all and singular those books and those things, which are or shall be printed or stamped contrary to the form of any statute, act, or proclamation, made, or to be made. The expenses attending the obtaining of this charter, are thus particularized in the books of the company: The chargis layde oute for oure Corporation. Fyrste, for two tymes wrytinge of our boke before yt was sygned be the kinge and the quene's majestie's highnes0180 Item, for the syngned and the prevy seale668 Item, for the great seale890 Item, for the wrytinge and inrolynge300 Item, for wax, lace, and examinacion034 Item, to the clerkes for expedycion0100 Item, for lymnynge and for the skin100

In the second year of Elizabeth, the stationers had the grant of a livery, and were directed to prepare and make ready the same liverys with speed, so that they may from henceforth attend and wait upon the lord mayor of this city at all common shews, &c. Thirty years afterwards, namely, in January, 1588-9, a precept was sent by the lord mayor, requiring the master and wardens, and six of the comeliest personages of the company, to attend him at the Park corner, above St. James's, on horseback, in velvet coats, chains of gold, and with staff torches, to wait on the queen for the recreating of her majesty in her progress from Chelsea to Whitehall.See the Precept at large in queen Elizabeth's Progresses, vol. iii. p. xv. Similar precepts for the attendance of the most graceful men of the company have also since been directed to the masters and wardens in different reigns.

James the First, by his letters patent, dated at Harfield, October the 29th, 1603, granted to the stationers' company the privilege of the sole printing of all manner of bookes and bookes of Prymers, Psalters, and Psalms, in meter, or prose, with musycall notes or without notes, both in great volumes and in small, in the English tonge, as well as all manner of almanackes and prognostycacions whatsoever in the English tonge, and all manner of bookes and pamphletts tendynge to the same purpose. By another charter dated at Westminster, March the 8th, 1615, the same monarch confirmed his former grant to the stationers, and established them in the sole right of printing the Psalms of David in English meetre, and notes to singe them; the A, B, C, with the little catechisme, and the catechisme in English and Latine, by Alexander Nowell, all which had been already transferred to the company under a grant made by queen Elizabeth: he also gave them liberty to make the necessary laws and ordinances for the due maintenance of their privileges.

The sole right of printing almanacks was long maintained by this company; but in the early part of the last reign, after a strenuously-contested litigation in the courts of law, a Mr. Thomas Carnan, bookseller, in St Paul's church-yard, obtained a legal decision against the exclusive privilege of the stationers; and the printing of almanacks was in consequence left open to the public at large. The prior possession of the trade, however, the holding of all the popular copyrights, and the low rates at which their almanacks are retailed, have contributed to secure to the company almost as general a sale as if their previous monopoly had been established; and the publication of these annual calendars forms a very productive branch of the revenue.

The entry of printed books on the registers of the stationers' company, which is attended by the payment of a small sum, and the deposit of nine copies of the work entered, secures protection from piracy, under pain of certain specific penalties.Brayley's Hist. of London ii. p. 433.

It is a livery company governed by a master, two wardens, and twenty-one assistants.

The hall of this company is a handsome edifice, situated on the west side of Stationers'-hall-court, Ludgate-hill.

Tallow Chandlers. 21.

Arms. Per fesse az, and ar., a pale counterchanged, three doves of the last, each holding in the beak an olive branch or. CRESTS. First, a demi-angel issuing from clouds proper, vested az. wings, expanded or, crined of the last; on his head a cap; thereon a cross pattee of the third, holding a dish ar, glorified or, therein the head of St. John Baptist proper. Second, a dish ar, glorified or, therein the head of St. John Baptist proper. Supporters. Two angels proper, vested gold colour, crined and ducally crowned or; the coronet surmounted with an etoile of the last, each standing on a mount vert. Motto. Ecce agnus Dei, qui tollit peccata mundi.

This society was incorporated by king Edward IV. in the year 1463, by the name of The master and keepers of the art and mystery of tallow-chandlers of the city of London.

This company in former times dealt not only in candles, but in oil, vinegar, butter, hops, soap, &c. They were, in the 3rd of Henry VIII. authorised to search for and destroy all corrupt oil.

In the reign of Edward VI. anno 1551, the tallow chandlers of London, upon some disgust (perhaps upon the city's setting too low a price on their commodities) refused to sell any, by an universal consent. Orders upon this were taken by the king and council, commanding them to sell their candles, and some of them were sent to prison.

It is a livery company, and is governed by a master, four wardens and court of assistants. The hall of this company is in Dowgate hill.

The Names of the Company of Talowe Chaundelers, from the Record in the Chapter House. John HamptonWillm. Fford Herry NorterycheJohn Hale Richard BlakeGilbert Lawson John BurnettJohn Awsten Willm. LamyntRobert Ffen Edmond GoodwynWillm. Curtes Raffe ColynRichard Hutton Robert HeronJohn Cocks Thomas BellRichard Letgolde Thomas CuttellGeorge Davers Thomas BarberRichard King Robert HuntGeorge Craggs Robert JonsonJohn Odam Stephn AstellThomas Joys Humfrey NalsonEdmond Vngles Thomas PerynJohn Elyott John HarysonJohn Parker Henry NormanHenry Kychell James QuykeJohn Gyff Edward GregoryJohn Walter Adam HarrysGerard Johnson Willm. StephensJohn Rufford Willm. JohnesThomas Cocks Willm. DancasterJohn Albright Richard MedleyJohn Blithe Willm. KnyghtWillm. Sydenham Thomas StoweyJohn Waterhouse Willm. ProwtyngJohn Jee Thomas EveJohn Waram Alex. BrownWillm. Dobson Willm. BradfoteThomas Saunders Willm. IveWillm. Trowlopp John KingThomas Haswell Walter CarterJohn Haynes Richard DowrettRaufe Walker Richard EveJohn Kydder John GoodladWillm. Piper Raffe MarshallJohn Gyatt Richard LevishamPeter Byrall Richard AtkinsonJohn Tyell Robert AwoodeWater Grene Thomas JenettsWillm. Godiscoke Robert GrenefeldWater Westmland Willm. CroksWater Billing Henry SymsonJohn Norteryche John ChapmanJohn Turgeoft Edmond PrymroseThomas Ffeld John AmbroseJohn Leving Willm. WolmoreHumfrey Ganey Thomas Reymond

Tylers and Bricklayers. 37.

Arms. Az. a chevron or, in chief a fleur-de-lis ar, between two brick axes, palewise of the second; in base a bundle of laths of the last. Crest. A dexter arm embowed, vested per pale or and az, cuffed ar, holding in the hand proper a brick-axe or. Motto. In God is all our trust.

Though this fraternity appears to be very ancient, yet they were not incorporated till the tenth year of the reign of queen Elizabeth, who, by her letters patent, dated the 3rd of August, 1508, incorporated them by the name of The master, and keepers, or wardens of the society of freemen of the mystery or art of tilers and bricklayers of London ; which was afterwards confirmed by James II. in the 2nd year of his reign.

This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, two wardens, and thirty-eight assistants.

They had formerly a convenient hall in a court on the south side of Leadenhall-street, but it has been long deserted by the company, and is now used as a jews' synagogue. The business of the company is transacted at the New London tavern.

The Names of the Company of Tylers from the Record in the Chapter-house. Water CowperSymond Nele Elys DiallJohn Davye John CouperJohn Wakelyn Richard PoulettRogier Kyrfote John StareEdward Aspyn John EstaweRobert Rikford Jeferey TullRobert Mayo Laurence MaxwellJohn Dytton John RandallWillm. a Dene Richard ClementStephn Bransgrave Willm. NortheRobert Wright Richard CaltonLawrence Adams John DollyngRichard Townshend Alex. NevisonAntony Huntley Edmond WydderThomas Slatter Jefery JonsonRobert Talworth Henry MalaryJohn Malyn Willm. SwaynsonCristofer Castor John PirryJohn Huntley Stephn JohnsonJohn Pyper Willm. GoteRobert Burton Thomas HudsonWillm. Myles John MylleJames Carter Richard FlauneverRafe Burbage Robert AlthroppJohn Benett Robert IveJohn Kervill Thomas MeriellRogier Barnes Thomas BurbageEdmond Dawson Richard MychellHenry Spenser Willm. PorterRichard Myles Robert ToyeRichard Shepard John StephnsonRobert Olyuer Robert JaksonThomas Priest Edward GaythorneJohn Elys John RychemountPhillip Morecrofte Thomas SmytheRichard Dynes Thomas ThorneRogier Gaythorne John ColmanJohn Pyforne Nicholas SymsonJohn Campione Willm. HarrysonNicholas Hill Griffith AppowellJames Lewsby Thomas ElysRobert Thornefeld John AwoodSymond Credence Richard KingThomas Eddes Willm. Stryngfellowe

Tin-Plate Workers. 72.

Arms. Sa. a chevron or, between three lamps (the two in chief, one light each, facing each other; the lamp in base, two lights,) ar, garnished or, illuminated proper. Crest. A globular ship lanthorn, or lamp, ensigned with a regal crown, all proper. Supporters. Two working tin-men, proper, (vested in blue coats with red cuffs, lined with fur, blue breeches, red waistcoat, white stockings, black shoes, and silver buckles; and on the head a fur cap.) Motto. Amore sitis uniti.

This fraternity was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles II. in the year 1670, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty of the art and mystery of tin-plate workers, alias wire-workers, of the city of London.

This is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and twenty assistants: their meetings are held at Guildhall.

Tobacco-Pipe-Makers. 78.

Arms. Ar. on a mount in base vert, three plants of tobacco, growing and flowering, all proper. Crest. A demi-moor, in his dexter hand a tobacco pipe, in the sinister a roll of tobacco, all proper. Supporters. Two young Moors, proper, wreathed about the loins with tobacco leaves vert, Motto. Let brotherly love continue.

This company was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles II. in the year 1663, by the style and title of The master, wardens, assistants and fellowship of the company of pipe-makers of the cities of London and Westminster.

They are governed by a master, two wardens, and eighteen assistants; but have no livery, or hall, holding their meeting sat Currier's-hall.

Turners. 51.

Arms.Granted 17th Dec. 1634. Az. a catherine wheel between two columns or; in chief a regal crown proper; in base an axe ar. handled of the second, lying fessewise, the blade downward. Crest. A female figure proper, representing St. Catherine; her hair dishevelled, her head within a circle of glory of the first, and ducally crowned or; vested az. lined with ermine; supporting with her dexter hand a catherine wheel of the second; in her sinister hand a sword, the point resting on the wreath ar. Motto. By faith I obtain.

The fraternity of turners is of ancient foundation, it was incorporated by letters patent of king James I. by the name of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the art or mystery de lez turners of London.

The turners anciently were measure makers, as appears from a record in the chamber of London.

This is a livery company, under the government of a master, two wardens, and twenty-four assistants.

Their hall is a small edifice on College-hill.

Upholders. 49.

Arms.Granted, 1465, approved and confirmed, 1134. Sa. three pavilions ermine, lined az. garnished or, two and one; within the pavilion, in base, a lamb couchant ar. on a cushion or, tasselled of the last; over the head a cross pattée fitchee gu.

This company was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles I. in the year 1627, by the name of The wardens, and commonalty of the mystery or art of the upholders of the city of London.

This is a livery company, and is governed by a master, wardens, and court of assistants.

Watermen. 91.

Arms. Barry wavy of six ar. and az. on the middle bar a boat or; on a chief of the second, two oars in saltier of the third, between two cushions of the first tasselled or. Crest. A dexter arm embowed proper, vested ar. holding in the hand an oar erect or; over the crest this Motto. By command of our superiors. Supporters. Two dolphins az. finned or.

The watermen do not appear to have had any charter of incorporation before the reign of Philip and Mary, when they were established by parliament, 1556, and it was enacted in the 2nd and 3rd of that reign, cap. 16, that, out of the watermen between Gravesend and Windsor, eight overseers shall be chosen by the court of aldermen of the city of London, to keep order over the whole body. Besides it is ordained, that their wherries are to be twelve feet and a half long, and four feet and a half broad in the midship, or be liable to forfeiture; watermen's names were to be registered by the overseers, and their fares appointed by the court of aldermen, &c. and the lord mayor and aldermen of London, and the justices of the peace of the counties adjoining to the Thames, have power to determine offences.

By an act passed in the second year of the reign of king George II. no waterman on the Thames shall take any apprentice or servant, unless he registers the place of his known habitation with the clerk of the company, on pain of ten pounds, and if any person, not having served seven years to a waterman, shall row any boat for hire, he incurs the like penalty; but gardeners' boats, dungboats, lighters, &c. are excepted.

By an act passed in the 7th and 8th Geo. IV. c. 75, this company was re-incorporated by the name> of The master, wardens, and commonalty of the watermen and lightermen of the river Thames; they are authorized to purchase land of the yearly value of 1,000l.

The common concerns of this company are regulated by a general court, consisting of a master, four wardens, and twenty-one assistants. All the boats belonging to this fraternity must be numbered and registered, and any exaction or extortion beyond the proper rates fixed by the lord mayor and court of aldermen (a list of which rates or fares is always hung up in the passage to the court rooms at Guildhall,) or any abuse or misbehaviour, subjects the offender to a fine or imprisonment for a stated time. The application for redress should be made generally to the clerk of the watermens'-hall, and the number of the boat given; the offender is then summoned to answer the complaint, and the cause is heard, and summarily decided. Among the offences punishable by fine, are immodest and lewd expressions, if uttered while rowing on the river, or at any of the plying places between Gravesend and Windsor. No waterman's apprentice is suffered to have the sole care of a boat, unless he shall have worked and rowed upon the river Thames, as an apprentice for two years, under a penalty of five pound on the master.

The number of watermen belonging to the company is upwards of 12,000, of whom about 8,000 are freemen of the city; 2,000 non-freemen, and 2,000 apprentices. About 4,000 of this body were, in the year 1796, supposed to be serving in the royal navy; the lords of the Admiralty having power to apply to the company, under an act made in the time of William and Mary, for a certain number of watermen whenever there should be occasion for their services. Waterman's-hall is a small but neat building, situated on St. Mary's-hill.

Waxchandlers. 20.

Arms. Az. on a chevron ar. between three mortcours (i. e. lamps) or, as many roses gu. seeded of the third, barbed vert. Crest. A maiden proper, kneeling among various flowers of the last, vested or, turned up ermine; in her hand a chaplet, or garland of flowers, of the first. Supporters. Two unicorns gu. guttee d'eau; armed crined, and unguled, or; gorged with a chaplet of roses gu. leaved vert, these to a flat chain or, at the end of the chain three rings of the last. Motto. Truth is the light.

This company is of ancient foundation, and was incorporated by letters patent of king Richard III. in the year 1483, by the name and style of The master, wardens, and commonalty, of the art or mystery of waxchandlers of London. It is a livery company, and the twentieth on the city list.

They are governed by a master, wardens, and court of assistants.

The hall of this company, which is a modern building of brick, is situated in Maiden-lane, Wood-street.

The Names of the Company of Wexechandelers, from the Record in the Chapter-House. Thomas LaneJohn Kechyn Edward BillyngRichard Cocks John ScampionWillm. Scampion Willm. HullWillm. Wakeffeld John ShepardSymond Burton John DevellThomas Jakett Willm. RussellEdmond Scampion Willm. HarmondAllane Creswell Willm. BaynardJohn Swetyng Willm. PeerisWillm. Sowthwell Thomas CresseyRobt. Marsy Thomas LawlesRobert Gray Thomas GrenellRobt. Nashe Walter SawlkinEdward Lowman Agnes Sawlkin wedoweEdward Gyllam Richard FfordJohn Robards Willm. KendellHenry Blowar Robert BowlmerWillm. Pesgood John ErleThomas Vaux George BlaychardRobert Throwar Willm. HilyardJohn Vausse John LyndRichard Hastyngs

Weavers. 42.

Arms.Arms and crest granted 1487; supporters granted and the whole confirmed 1616. Az. on a chevron ar. between three leopard's heads or, each having in the mouth a shuttle of the last, as many roses gu. seeded of the third, barbed vert. Crest. A leopard's head or, ducally crowned gu. in his mouth a shuttle of the first. Supporters. Two wyverns with wings, indorsed ermine, purfled or, on each wing a rose gu. seeded or, barbed vert. Motto. Weave truth with trust.

This fraternity is very ancient, and were originally called Thellarii; and, in the reign of king Henry I. they paid sixteen pounds annually to the crown, for their immunities. It is supposed they were the first incorporated of all the city companies; and this conjecture is corroborated by a passage in Cotton's Records of Parliament, which states, that in the eighth of Henry the Fourth, the weavers of London prayed the king that their charter granted by Henry, son of Maud the empress, for twenty marks two shillings of fee farm, may be confirmed, so as the weavers, strangers, may be under their governance. In the charter referred to, which has been given in English by Stow,Survey of London, p. 266. ed. 1598. it was ordained, that no person either in the city, or in Southwark, or any other place appertaining to London, should exercise the weavers' craft, unless he belonged to their guild; and that no man should injure them under a penalty of 10l.: by the same instrument the weavers were ordered to pay to the king two marks of gold, annually, at Michaelmas. Henry the Second again confirmed the franchises of the company in his thirty-first year, but decreed also, that if any man made cloth of Spanish wool, mixed with English wool, the port-grave ought to burn it. Ibid.

The tenacity with which the weavers maintained their chartered rights gave such offence, and occasioned so much contention, that, about the year 1200, the city offered king John a gratuity of 60 marks to dissolve the company. The result is differently stated: but the probability is, that the weavers were only at that time subjected to an increase of rent; but by an act of parliament passed in the reign of king Henry IV. they were put under the management and authority of the lord mayor and aldermen of the city. This company originally consisted of tapestry and cloth weavers; at present, however, it chiefly consists of worsted, cotton, and silk-weavers. It is a livery company, governed by two bailiffs, two wardens, and sixteen assistants. Their hall is on the east side of Basinghall street.

The Names of the Company of Wevers from the Record in the Chapter-house. Thomas MorantRogier Martyndall John StrakerJohn Wotton John TrymeWillm. Alderson Robert CowteJohn Robynson John ChamblayneWillm. Thorneton Elys LytheJohn Martyn Hugh GermondWillm. Wallys Thomas NelsonJohn Thowes John PeyleRychard Lame John Chamberlain, the yongerThomas Aunsell Willm. HuntJohn White Gryffyn MathiewArnold Polles Richard WilsonWillm. Marley Richard HygonsThomas Ellys Gervase SauageJohn Dalyson

Wheelwrights. 73.

Arms. Gu. a chevron between three wheels or, on a chief ar. an axe lying fessewise proper. Crest. A dexter arm embowed vested gu. cuffed ar. holding in the hand proper, a mallet or. Supporters. Two horses ar. Motto. God grant unity.

The company of wheelwrights was incorporated by letters patent of king Charles II. in the year 1670, by the name of The master, wardens, assistants, and commonalty, of the art and mystery of wheeelwrights of the city of London.

It is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and twenty-two assistants.

Woodmongers. 85.

Arms. Gu. a sword erect ar. hilt and pomel or, enfiled with a ducal coronet of the last, between two flanches of the second, each charged with a faggot proper. Crest. A mount vert, thereon a grove of trees, all proper; a lion issuing from the grove or. Supporters. Two human figures; the dexter representing St. John the Baptist proper, vested with a short coat of camel's hair, belted round the waist; holding in his dexter hand a book open, on which are the following words: The axe is laid to the root of the tree; all proper, his arms and legs naked, round his head a circle of glory: the sinister a female figure representing St. Catherine, vested and habited, all proper, on her head an eastern crown or, resting her sinister hand on a wheel of her martyrdom, of the last. Motto. Unita fortior.

This is an ancient fraternity, and was incorporated with that of the carmen, by letters patent of James I. in the year 1605, with whom they continued till the year 1688, when being found guilty of mal-practices, they threw up their charter to avoid a more severe punishment. However, by an act of common council passed in the year 1694, they obtained the privilege of keeping one hundred and twenty carts (exclusive of those kept by carmen) for the more effectually executing their business.

This company had the management of the public carts committed to them for some time; but by reason of their bad conduct, the privilege was taken from them, and the charge of inspection restored to Christ's hospital.

Woolmen. 43.

Arms. Gu. a wool-pack ar.

Though the antiquity of this society may reasonably be supposed to be equal to that of the wool-trade in this kingdom, yet it is only a fraternity by prescription. However, it is one of the city companies, and is distinguished by the name of The master, wardens, and assistants of the fraternity or company of woolmen of the city of London.

It is a livery company, and consists of a master, two wardens, and a number of assistants.

The two following lists conclude the curious record of the names of the members of various trading companies in 1537; the whole has been printed verbatim from the manuscript, and forms an interesting view of the number and professions of the inhabitants of London during the reign of Henry the Eighth. The purpose for which it was taken is not known, probably to assess the richest members for aids to the crown, as figures are placed opposite several member's names; especially those of the affluent company of merchant taylors.

The Names of the Company of Pastelers from the Record in the Chapter-house.

John StephnsonThomas Samond John FfluddCristofer Smythe Rogier PlayfoteJohn Chamberlayn Richard NycsonJohn Wilcocks John LaurenceBarnard Garrat Richard ParkerRichard Jemson Willm. SpinkeJohn Aleyn Richard TowneshendGeorge Briges Thomas NasheJohn Poope Robert BrydeRobert Cotyngham Raffe IswellJohn Grove Richard WilkinsonRichard Monke Rogier BettsRichard Fflynthurste Willm. AndersonWillm. Harward John MirfynThomas Lorkyn Rogier BrusheAndrewe Rive John CookeWillm. Palmer John ArmestrongJohn Mynstrelsey Thomas BaytmanWillm. Robynson John MatheweJohn Hodges Mathiew WhiteWillm Pogehorne Stephn GodJohn Holte Richard HusbandJohn Creswell Ariane Hanbushe

The Names of the Company of Sporyars from the Record in the Chapter House.

Thomas PiersJames aNappe Willm. MyllesDenys Ballye Thomas RobertRichard Ffaburen Water ChilderhouseHenry Preston Thomas ReysonPatrike Lorkyn Willm. RobertsChristofer Cokar Thomas WoodwardThomas Boston Robert GrenwayThomas Palmer Richard TylhamThomas Bordwell Willm. SharpThomas Wyeld

 
 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: History of London, from the Accession of William and Mary, to the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER II: History of London during the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER III: History of London from the Accession of George the Third, to the year 1780
 CHAPTER IV: History of London continued to the Union
 CHAPTER V: History of London from the Union to the Jubilee, 1809
 CHAPTER VI: History of London from the Jubilee to the Peace of 1814
 CHAPTER VII: History of London continued to the accession of George the Fourth
 CHAPTER VIII: Account of the Civil Government of the City by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors, with a list of the latter...
 CHAPTER IX: An account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, with a list of the latter
collapseCHAPTER X: Lists and brief Accounts of the various Officers and Courts within the City
collapseCHAPTER XI: Some account of the Ecclesiastical Government of the city of London, with a List and Biographical Notices of the Bishops of the see
collapseCHAPTER XII: Some Account of the Military Government of London, and the Artillery Company
collapseCHAPTER XIII: An Account of the twelve principal Companies of the City of London
collapseCHAPTER XIV: An Account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged
 CHAPTER XV: An Account of the River Thames
collapseCHAPTER XVI: Historical and topographical account of London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Blackfriars Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and the Thames Tunnel
collapseCHAPTER XVII: Topographical and Historical Account of the Tower of London
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44305
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00067
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights