The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 2

Allen, Thomas
1828

The city of London, like many other corporate towns at the present day, had originally but one collective trading company or fraternity, called the guilda mercatoria; but when the population increased, and trades became more numerous, the citizens began to associate in distinct companies, according to their respective occupations, and to seek charters of incorporation and protection for the purpose of excluding non-freemen from exercising the same trade within the precincts of the city.

Merchant guilds do not appear to have been known to the Anglo Saxons, nor does it appear very certain that they were introduced into this country on the arrival of the Normans, although it is extremely probable that this was the case. The first mention we find of a guild or fraternity of tradesmen occurs in a record in the Exchequer, during the reign of Henry I. in which a sum of sixteen pounds is entered as having been paid by Robert the son of Leuestan, as the rent or ferme for the guild of weavers of London.Madox. Fir Bur. p. 191. It is probable that the various fraternities were now rapidly augmenting by royal privilege. The oldest patents or charters of incorporation, however, that have been preserved, are those of the skinners and goldsmiths, which were granted by Edward III. in the year 1327. Several fictitious or self-constituted guilds had, however, been set up a century and a half before this time, but being without the royal licence they were fined. Indeed, so early as the year 1180, we find sixteen of these adulterine guilds as they were called, fined by Henry II. in various sums of from one mark to forty-five marks each.See vol. i. p. 61. The city companies, though branches of the general corporation, have each a distinct government and peculiar liberties and immunities granted to them by their respective charters. Most of the companies have separate halls for their place of meeting, either to transact business or for their banquets. Each company has a master, or prime warden, wardens, assistants, clerks, and other subordinate officers, for the general management and government of its affairs. The following are the names of all the companies arranged in their order of precedency. 1MERCERS.47Stationers. 2GROCERS.48Embroiderers. 3DRAPERS.49Upholders. 4FISHMONGERS.50Musicians. 5GOLDSMITHS.51Turners. 6SKINNERS.52Basket-makers. 7MERCHANT TAYLORS.53Glaziers. 8HABERDASHERS.54Horners. 9SALTERS.55Farriers. 10IRONMONGERS.56Paviors. 11VINTNERS.57Loriners. 12CLOTH-WORKERS.58Apothecaries. 13Dyers.59Shipwrights. 14Brewers.60Spectacle-makers. 15Leather-sellers.61Clock-makers. 16Pewterers.62Glovers. 17Barbers.63Comb-makers. 18Cutlers.64Felt-makers. 19Bakers.65Framework-knitters. 20Wax-chandlers.66Silk-throwsters. 21Tallow-chandlers.67Silk-men. 22Armourers and braziers.68Pin-makers. 23Girdlers.69Needle-makers. 24Butchers.70Gardeners. drawers. 25Sadlers.71Soap-makers. 26Carpenters.72Tin-plate-workers. 27Cordwainers.73Wheel-wrights. 28Painter-stainers.74Distillers. 29Curriers.75Hatband-makers. 30Masons.76Patten-makers. 31Plumbers.77Glass-sellers. 32Innholders.78Tobacco-pipe makers. 33Founders.79Coach, and Coach-harnessmakers. 34Poulterers.80Gun-makers. 35Cooks.81Gold and Silver Wire- 36Coopers.82Long bow-string makers. 37Tylers and Bricklayers.83Card-makers. 38Bowyers.84Fan-makers. 39Fletchers.85Wood-mongers. 40Blacksmiths.86Starch-makers. 41Joiners.87Fishermen. 42Weavers.88Parish-clerks. 43Woolmen.89Carmen. 44Scriveners.90Porters. 45Fruiterers.91Watermen. 46Plasterers.

The city of London, like many other corporate towns at the present day, had originally but collective trading company or fraternity, called the ; but when the population increased, and trades became more numerous, the citizens began to associate in distinct companies, according to their respective occupations, and to seek charters of incorporation and protection for the purpose of excluding non-freemen from exercising the same trade within the precincts of the city.

Merchant guilds do not appear to have been known to the Anglo Saxons, nor does it appear very certain that they were introduced into this country on the arrival of the Normans, although it is extremely probable that this was the case. The mention we find of a guild or fraternity of tradesmen occurs in a record in , during the reign of Henry I. in which a sum of is entered as having been paid by Robert the son of Leuestan, as the rent or ferme for the guild of weavers of London. It is probable that the various fraternities were now rapidly augmenting by royal privilege. The oldest patents or charters of incorporation, however, that have been preserved, are those of the skinners and goldsmiths, which were granted by Edward III. in the year . Several fictitious or self-constituted guilds had, however, been set up a century and a half before this time, but being without the royal licence they were fined. Indeed, so early

338

as the year , we find of these guilds as they were called, fined by Henry II. in various sums of from to each. The city companies, though branches of the general corporation, have each a distinct government and peculiar liberties and immunities granted to them by their respective charters. Most of the companies have separate halls for their place of meeting, either to transact business or for their banquets. Each company has a master, or prime warden, wardens, assistants, clerks, and other subordinate officers, for the general management and government of its affairs. The following are the names of all the companies arranged in their order of precedency.
1MERCERS.47Stationers.
2GROCERS.48Embroiderers.
3DRAPERS.49Upholders.
4FISHMONGERS.50Musicians.
5GOLDSMITHS.51Turners.
6SKINNERS.52Basket-makers.
7MERCHANT TAYLORS.53Glaziers.
8HABERDASHERS.54Horners.
9SALTERS.55Farriers.
10IRONMONGERS.56Paviors.
11VINTNERS.57Loriners.
12CLOTH-WORKERS.58Apothecaries.
13Dyers.59Shipwrights.
14Brewers.60Spectacle-makers.
15Leather-sellers.61Clock-makers.
16Pewterers.62Glovers.
17Barbers.63Comb-makers.
18Cutlers.64Felt-makers.
19Bakers.65Framework-knitters.
20Wax-chandlers.66Silk-throwsters.
21Tallow-chandlers.67Silk-men.
22Armourers and braziers.68Pin-makers.
23Girdlers.69Needle-makers.
24Butchers.70Gardeners. drawers.
25Sadlers.71Soap-makers.
26Carpenters.72Tin-plate-workers.
27Cordwainers.73Wheel-wrights.
28Painter-stainers.74Distillers.
29Curriers.75Hatband-makers.
30Masons.76Patten-makers.
31Plumbers.77Glass-sellers.
32Innholders.78Tobacco-pipe makers.
33Founders.79Coach, and Coach-harnessmakers.
34Poulterers.80Gun-makers.
35Cooks.81Gold and Silver Wire-
36Coopers.82Long bow-string makers.
37Tylers and Bricklayers.83Card-makers.
38Bowyers.84Fan-makers.
39Fletchers.85Wood-mongers.
40Blacksmiths.86Starch-makers.
41Joiners.87Fishermen.
42Weavers.88Parish-clerks.
43Woolmen.89Carmen.
44Scriveners.90Porters.
45Fruiterers.91Watermen.
46Plasterers.

339

 
 
 
Footnotes:

[] Madox. Fir Bur. p. 191.

[] See vol. i. p. 61.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: History of London, from the Accession of William and Mary, to the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER II: History of London during the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER III: History of London from the Accession of George the Third, to the year 1780
 CHAPTER IV: History of London continued to the Union
 CHAPTER V: History of London from the Union to the Jubilee, 1809
 CHAPTER VI: History of London from the Jubilee to the Peace of 1814
 CHAPTER VII: History of London continued to the accession of George the Fourth
 CHAPTER VIII: Account of the Civil Government of the City by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors, with a list of the latter...
 CHAPTER IX: An account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, with a list of the latter
collapseCHAPTER X: Lists and brief Accounts of the various Officers and Courts within the City
collapseCHAPTER XI: Some account of the Ecclesiastical Government of the city of London, with a List and Biographical Notices of the Bishops of the see
collapseCHAPTER XII: Some Account of the Military Government of London, and the Artillery Company
collapseCHAPTER XIII: An Account of the twelve principal Companies of the City of London
collapseCHAPTER XIV: An Account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged
 CHAPTER XV: An Account of the River Thames
collapseCHAPTER XVI: Historical and topographical account of London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Blackfriars Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and the Thames Tunnel
collapseCHAPTER XVII: Topographical and Historical Account of the Tower of London
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44305
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00067
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights