The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 2

Allen, Thomas
1828

The Sheriffs' Courts.

The Sheriffs' Courts.

These are courts of record, held in Guildhall, of which the sheriffs being judges, each has his assistant or deputy, who are commonly called judges of these courts, before whom are tried actions of debt, trespass, covenant, &c. To each of these courts belong four attornies, who upon their being admitted by the court of aldermen, have the following oath administered to them:--

The Oath. Ye shall swear, that ye shall well and lawfully do your office of attorney, and well and lawfully examine your clients, and their quarrels, without champarty, and without procuring of any juries, or any inquest embracing. And that ye shall change no quarrel out of his nature, after your understanding. Also ye shall plead, ne ley, nor suffer to be pleaded or leyed by your assent, no foreign release, acquittance, payment, arbitration, plain account, whatsoever it be, to put the court out of his jurisdiction, nor none other matter; but it be such as ye may find rightful and true by the information of your client, whose information and saying upon your oath and conscience ye shall think to be true. And ye shall not inform ne inforce any man to sue falsely against any person by false or forged action. Ready ye shall be at all times to come and attend at the warning of the said maior, and of the sheriffs of the said city, unless ye be letted about the business of this city, or for some other reasonable cause. The franchises, laws, and ordinances of this city, you shall keep, and due to be kept to your power. And that well and lawfully ye shall do all things that to the office of attorney pertaineth to do. As God help you.

To each of these courts likewise belong a secondary, a clerk of the papers, a prothonotary, and four clerks sitters. The secondary's office is to allow and return all writs brought to remove causes out of the said courts; the clerk of the papers files and copies all declarations upon actions: the prothonotary draws and engrosses all declarations; the clerks sitters enter actions and attachments, and take bail and verdicts. To each of the compters or prisons belonging to these courts, appertain sixteen serjeants at mace, with a yeoman to each, besides inferior officers, and the prison keeper.

These are courts of record, held in , of which the sheriffs being judges, each has his assistant or deputy, who are commonly called judges of these courts, before whom are tried actions of debt, trespass, covenant, &c. To each of these courts belong attornies, who upon their being admitted by the court of aldermen, have the following oath administered to them:--

To each of these courts likewise belong a secondary, a clerk of the papers, a prothonotary, and clerks sitters. The secondary's office is to allow and return all writs brought to remove causes out of the said courts; the clerk of the papers files and copies all declarations upon actions: the prothonotary draws and engrosses all declarations; the clerks sitters enter actions and attachments, and take bail and verdicts. To each of the compters or prisons belonging to these courts, appertain serjeants at mace, with a yeoman to each, besides inferior officers, and the prison keeper.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: History of London, from the Accession of William and Mary, to the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER II: History of London during the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER III: History of London from the Accession of George the Third, to the year 1780
 CHAPTER IV: History of London continued to the Union
 CHAPTER V: History of London from the Union to the Jubilee, 1809
 CHAPTER VI: History of London from the Jubilee to the Peace of 1814
 CHAPTER VII: History of London continued to the accession of George the Fourth
 CHAPTER VIII: Account of the Civil Government of the City by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors, with a list of the latter...
 CHAPTER IX: An account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, with a list of the latter
collapseCHAPTER X: Lists and brief Accounts of the various Officers and Courts within the City
collapseCHAPTER XI: Some account of the Ecclesiastical Government of the city of London, with a List and Biographical Notices of the Bishops of the see
collapseCHAPTER XII: Some Account of the Military Government of London, and the Artillery Company
collapseCHAPTER XIII: An Account of the twelve principal Companies of the City of London
collapseCHAPTER XIV: An Account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged
 CHAPTER XV: An Account of the River Thames
collapseCHAPTER XVI: Historical and topographical account of London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Blackfriars Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and the Thames Tunnel
collapseCHAPTER XVII: Topographical and Historical Account of the Tower of London
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44305
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00067
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights