The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 2

Allen, Thomas
1828

The Court of Common Council.

The Court of Common Council.

This court, as already observed, consists of the lord mayor, aldermen, and representatives of the several wards; and being the city legislature, make bye-laws for the good government thereof; they assemble in Guildhall, as often as the lord mayor by his summons thinks proper to convene them; they annually select from among themselves a committee of twelve aldermen and thirty commoners, for letting the city lands. They likewise appoint the following committees, viz. ten aldermen and thirty commoners, for letting the bridge-house estates; four aldermen and eight commoners, for transacting the affairs belonging to the benefactions of sir Thomas Gresham, the lord mayor being always one of the number; sixteen aldermen and thirty commoners for improving the navigation of the river Thames; sixteen aldermen and thirty commoners as a committee of control over the coal and corn meters; sixteen aldermen and thirty commoners as a committee for general purposes; the lord mayor and certain of the aldermen, together with thirty commoners, as a committee for improvements within the city, and the same for improving the port of London. They also, by virtue of a royal grant, yearly appoint a governor, deputy, and assistants, for managing the city lands in Ireland. They have also a right of disposing of the offices of town-clerk, common-serjeant, judges of the sheriffs' court, common pleader, common crier, coroner, bailiff of the borough of Southwark, comptroller, remembrancer, solicitor, clerk of the peace, registrar of the mayor's court, clerks of the court of requests, comptroller of the bridge-house, water-bailiff, clerk of the works, coal meters, keeper of Guildhall and assistants, clerk at the bridge-house, collector of the city dues, three clerks of the coal market, and keeper of the Green-yard.

This court, as already observed, consists of the lord mayor, aldermen, and representatives of the several wards; and being the city legislature, make bye-laws for the good government thereof; they assemble in , as often as the lord mayor by his summons thinks proper to convene them; they annually select from among themselves a committee of aldermen and commoners, for letting the city lands. They likewise appoint the following committees, viz. aldermen and commoners, for letting the bridge-house estates; aldermen and commoners, for transacting the affairs belonging to the benefactions of sir Thomas Gresham, the lord mayor being always of the number; aldermen and commoners for improving the navigation of the river Thames; aldermen and commoners as a committee of control over the coal and corn meters; aldermen and commoners as a committee for general purposes; the lord mayor and certain of the aldermen, together with commoners, as a committee for improvements within the city, and the same for improving the port of London. They also, by virtue of a royal grant, yearly appoint a governor, deputy, and assistants, for managing the city lands in Ireland. They have also a right of disposing of the offices of town-clerk, common-serjeant, judges of the sheriffs' court, common pleader, common crier, coroner, bailiff of the borough of , comptroller, remembrancer, solicitor, clerk of the peace, registrar of the mayor's court, clerks of the court of requests, comptroller of the bridge-house, water-bailiff, clerk of the works, coal meters, keeper of and assistants, clerk at the bridge-house, collector of the city dues, clerks of the coal market, and keeper of the Green-yard.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: History of London, from the Accession of William and Mary, to the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER II: History of London during the reign of George the Second
 CHAPTER III: History of London from the Accession of George the Third, to the year 1780
 CHAPTER IV: History of London continued to the Union
 CHAPTER V: History of London from the Union to the Jubilee, 1809
 CHAPTER VI: History of London from the Jubilee to the Peace of 1814
 CHAPTER VII: History of London continued to the accession of George the Fourth
 CHAPTER VIII: Account of the Civil Government of the City by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors, with a list of the latter...
 CHAPTER IX: An account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, with a list of the latter
collapseCHAPTER X: Lists and brief Accounts of the various Officers and Courts within the City
collapseCHAPTER XI: Some account of the Ecclesiastical Government of the city of London, with a List and Biographical Notices of the Bishops of the see
collapseCHAPTER XII: Some Account of the Military Government of London, and the Artillery Company
collapseCHAPTER XIII: An Account of the twelve principal Companies of the City of London
collapseCHAPTER XIV: An Account of the Companies of the City of London, alphabetically arranged
 CHAPTER XV: An Account of the River Thames
collapseCHAPTER XVI: Historical and topographical account of London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Blackfriars Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, Southwark Bridge, and the Thames Tunnel
collapseCHAPTER XVII: Topographical and Historical Account of the Tower of London
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44305
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00067
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights